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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 184 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 165 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 149 1 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 94 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 88 2 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 78 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 77 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 69 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 69 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 65 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for R. E. Rodes or search for R. E. Rodes in all documents.

Your search returned 29 results in 7 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Work of the Ordnance Bureau of the war Department of the Confederate States, 1861-5. (search)
try weapons alone. Much the same state of things existed as to artillery, both seacoast and field guns. As an illustration I may mention that when I joined Genl. R. E. Rodes' brigade for field service, the battery of Capt. (afterwards Col.) Thos. H. Carter, which was attached to the brigade, had a scratch lot of guns consisting o This fact primarily led to my becoming connected with the ordnance corps. I was in the summer of 1862 serving most pleasantly as aide-de-camp on the staff of General Rodes, whom I had known well before the war. Another friend of his was Colonel Briscoe Baldwin, chief ordnance officer on the staff of General Lee, and who had been in front of Petersburg in July, 1864, after the memorable campaign of the wilderness, when I saw for the last time my well and affectionately remembered chief, General Rodes, killed in the following September at Winchester. During the Civil War of 1861, the armament and warlike munitions of the world were very different from and m
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Review of the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
on the 27th, with two divisions, Johnson's and Rodes', while Early was deflected to the east, and df the 1st that he was advancing on Gettysburg, Rodes' division, moving in the direction of Cashtownter 2 o'clock when the bright steel barrels of Rodes' men were seen glistening in the sun as his brhour of relief. The three leading brigades of Rodes' moved across the slope in splendid style, witerson's and O'Neil's brigades, sent forward by Rodes, missed their direction, and became involved its heighth, Early with his division came up on Rodes' left. Gordon's brigade made an impetuous chare co-operation,—that he rode to find Ewell or Rodes or Hill for the purpose of urging an immediaten of the battlefield, including Oak Hill where Rodes' brigades deployed in line. It also gave mef artillery and a number of prisoners. Before Rodes had completed his arrangements, Early had withment as useless, the assault having failed. Rodes to the north of the town, says his troops were[4 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General J. E. B. Stuart in the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
roves? (I was a staff officer in Johnson's division and kept a careful diary of the campaign). But, if it was written on the 28th, dispatched at midnight, and received by Ewell by 6 or 7 A. M., of the 29th, orders to Gen. Edward Johnson and to Gen. Rodes might well have been issued as early as 9 A. M. Again, if Ewell received the order on the morning of the 29th, it exactly harmonizes with his statement in his report that he was starting on the 29th for Harrisburg when ordered by the Generalon on General Ewell's right, that officer was just leaving Hagerstown. In his report (Rebellion Records, Vol. XXVII, part 2, p. 443,) he says that on June 22nd, he received orders from the Commanding General to take Harrisburg, and next morning Rodes and Johnson commenced their march into Pennsylvania.] This order was repeated in a letter to General Stuart dated June 23, a part of which I ,will quote: headquarters, army of Northern Virginia, June 23, 1863, 3:30 P. M. Major-General J. E.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), An incident of the battle of Winchester, or Opequon. (search)
alor has no superior in the whole war. Ramseur, on our right, held his own against Sheridan's assault most gallantly. Rodes came in and drove the enemy's front, a splendid achievement. The battle trembled in the balance, as Colonel Thomas H. Cage a mile in distance and seeming to cover the whole face of the earth with their massive numbers. Just at that juncture Rodes fell, while directing his division with great skill and energy, and but for this deplorable misfortune it is far from cert the Confederates would not have prevailed. But the two things came at once, the enemy's reinforcements and the fall of Rodes. I never saw such a sight in my life as that of the tremendous force, the flying banners, sparkling bayonets and flash tremendous force, which over numbered Early fully four to one, and notwithstanding the fall of the gallant and efficient Rodes, Early extricated his army, and the battle closed, with the losses of Early (plus the loss in his cavalry, which for all
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Affidavit of Supervisors of Co. C, 149th regiment. Pa. Vols. (search)
time not only its numerical loss but its percentage of killed and wounded was greater than that which Pickett's troops had to submit to two days later, and that it was then waiting to be relieved. Early in the afternoon of this day my division (Rodes') arrived upon the field by the Carlisle road and at once went into action. My brigade (Daniel's) was on the right, and after doing some sharp fighting we came in sight of Heth's line, which was at right angles to ours as we approached. The dir, 1906. Dear Captain Bassler: Thanks for your pamphlet on the First Day's Fight, which I read (for the second time), with interest. It was always in my mind that our three regiments being hidden from observation by Hill's men, but in sight of Rodes' men, the two regimental colors were placed to draw the fire of Carter's batteries, on Oak Hill. For this purpose the flag of the 500th was planted near the stone quarry and that of the 149th not far from where the Reynolds monument is, with the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.34 (search)
Heckman's battery and to repulse the troops of General Custar, who were very troublesome at that juncture. The gallant Louisianians and North Carolinians did capture the guns and hurled back Custar's troops, but are not given even a scant reference by General Gordon in his book, although they were the adjacent troops of the division to which he belonged; nor does he give his division commanded any credit for the rapid and vigorous movement by which he accomplished this result. While Major-General Rodes, his comrade on many fields, and Brigadier-General Hayes, of Louisiana, likewise his comrade on many fields, fought gallantly and effectively on that day, the one to the right and the one to the left of him, so far as General Gordon's book is concerned, one would not know that these men ever existed. General Gordon had at that time, according to his report, which is in the war records, only about 800 men present with him on the field after his charge was over. Yet he speaks of my co
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Heth intended to cover his error. (search)
f the corps, whose report says that he put Pender's division in to support Heth's that was in distress, and that about 2:30 in the afternoon, Ewell with Early and Rodes' divisions came in and formed a right angle to his line and the field was won. Just as true an account of the battle as Heth's letter can be found in the Pickwick Papers. Rodes' report shows that Heth's story is a fable. The truth is that when Heth, early in the morning went into action, General Lee was ten miles away west of the mountain, Heth tries to make it appear that Lee was on the field. Other reports on the movement. Pendleton's report says they heard the firing when they were on the western slope of the mountain and that General Lee did not understand it. When Rodes arived on the field Heth's division was in fragments. Heth says he stumbled into the fight; he ought to have said he blundered into it. He says that had the cavalry been in position, General Lee would have known of Reynold's approach