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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., In command in Missouri. (search)
. Work on these gun-boats was driven forward night and day. As in the case of the fortifications, the work was carried on by torchlight. August 25th an expedition was ordered under Colonel G. Waagner with one regiment, accompanied by Commander John Rodgers with Brigadier-General Nathaniel Lyon. From a photograph. two gun-boats, to destroy the enemy's fortifications that were being constructed at Belmont. [See map, page 263.] August 28th I assigned Brigadier-General U. S. Grant to the co the Mississippi and the more immediate movements upon the Kentucky shore, together with the intention to hold the mouths of the Tennessee and Cumberland rivers. In his written instructions General Grant was directed to act in concert with Commander Rodgers and Colonel Waagner, and to take possession of points threatened by the Confederates on the Missouri and Kentucky shores. August 31st Captain Neustadter was ordered to Cairo to select a site opposite Paducah for a battery to command the
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The gun-boats at Belmont and Fort Henry. (search)
its share of men-o‘--war's men, Lieutenant-Commander Leonard Paulding having had the first choice of a full crew, and having secured all the frigate Sabine's reinlisted men who had been sent West. During the spring and summer of 1861, Commander John Rodgers purchased, and Wharf-boat at Cairo. From a war-time photograph. he, with Commander Roger N. Stembel, Lieutenant S. L. Phelps, and Mr. Eads, altered, equipped, and manned, for immediate service on the Ohio and Mississippi rivers, 3 woodus of doing good. He was not a man of striking personal appearance, but there was a sailor-like heartiness and frankness about him that made his company very desirable. Flag-Officer Foote arrived at Cairo September 12th, and relieved Commander John Rodgers of the command of the station. The first operations of the Western flotilla consisted chiefly of reconnoissances on the Mississippi, Ohio, Cumberland, and Tennessee rivers. At this time it was under the control of the War Department, an
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Union and Confederate navies. (search)
early organization was directed by the War Department, although a naval officer was placed in command. The complications resulting from this arrangement, under which, as Foote said, every brigadier could interfere with him, were obviated, October 1st, 1862, by the transfer of the force to the Navy Department. Launch of the Dictator from the Delamater iron works, New York, December 27, 1863. The first step in the creation of the Mississippi flotilla was taken in May, 1861, by Commander John Rodgers, who, acting under the authority of the War Department, purchased at Cincinnati three river-steamboats, the Conestoga, Lexington, and Tyler, and altered them into gun-boats by strengthening their frames, lowering their machinery, and protecting their decks by heavy bulwarks. In August, the War Department made a contract with James B. Eads [see page 338], the famous engineer of the Mississippi jetties, to build in two months seven gun-boats, propelled by a central paddle-wheel, and c
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 14.55 (search)
tly, passed between the headlands, and disappeared in the distance. Soon after sunrise the next day, three steamers commanded by Tattnall made their appearance in like manner. It so happened that General H. G. Wright, of the army, and Captain John Rodgers, of the navy, had gone on board of the Ottawa, under the instructions of their commanding officers, to make a reconnoissance of the forts, and had brought within supporting distance the Pawnee, carrying a heavy battery, and the Isaac Smitht this time the flag-ship and her followers had returned from their tour, and were again ready to swoop down and deliver other broadsides. Two pivot guns fired from the flag-ship received no response, and signal was made to cease firing. Captain John Rodgers, who was serving as aide to the flag-officer, was sent on shore with a flag of truce. On landing he found no garrison, and at 2:20 P. M. hoisted the Union flag over the fort. When that honored emblem appeared, the rigging was manned in a
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The first fight of iron-clads. (search)
reshet, the obstructions were only partial. We had only succeeded in getting into position three thirty-twos and two sixty-fours (shell guns) and were without sufficient supply of ammunition, when on the 15th of May the iron-clad Galena, Commander John Rodgers, followed by the Monitor and three others, hove in sight. We opened fire as soon as they came within range, directing most of it on the Galena. This vessel was handled very skillfully. Coming up within six hundred yards of the battery,ded; on the Port Royal, 1 wounded, and on the Naugatuck, 2 wounded. Total, 13 killed and 14 wounded.-editors. This was one of the boldest and best-conducted operations of the war, and one of which very little notice has been taken. Had Commander Rodgers been supported by a few brigades, landed at City Point or above on the south side, Richmond would have been evacuated. The Virginia's crew alone barred his way to Richmond; otherwise the obstructions would not have prevented his steaming u
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 15.58 (search)
finish the destruction of the scuttled ships, to burn and otherwise destroy, as far as practicable, the property in the yard, and withdraw with the frigate Cumberland, in tow of the Pawnee and a steam-tug which was lying at the yard. To Commander John Rodgers, of the navy, and myself was assigned the duty of blowing up the dry-dock, assisted by forty men of the volunteers and a few men from the crew of the Pawnee. Captain Wright and Commander Rodgers lighted the matches, but the mine, as was Commander Rodgers lighted the matches, but the mine, as was afterward learned, did not explode. The heat from the burning buildings drove the men in the boats from the landing, and the two officers, alone and hemmed in, had to give themselves up to the commander of the Virginia forces. They were taken to Richmond, and released on April 24th. In his Recollections, Captain W. H. Parker, C. S. N., says: The evacuation of Norfolk by the Federals was a most fortunate thing for the Confederates. Why the Federal authorities did this was always beyond my
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., In the monitor turret. (search)
to attack in the comparatively shoal waters above Hampton Roads, where the Union fleet could not maneuver. The Merrimac protected the James River, and the Monitor protected the Chesapeake. Neither side had an iron-clad in reserve, and neither wished to bring on an engagement which might disable its only armored vessel in those waters. With the evacuation of Norfolk and the destruction of the Merrimac, the Monitor moved up the James River with the squadron under the command of Commander John Rodgers, in connection with McClellan's advance upon Richmond by the Peninsula. We were engaged for four hours at Fort Darling, but were unable to silence the guns or destroy the earth-works. Probably no ship was ever devised which was so uncomfortable for her crew, and certainly no sailor ever led a more disagreeable life than we did on the James River, suffocated with heat and bad air if we remained below, and a target for sharp-shooters if we came on deck. With the withdrawal of
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 15.63 (search)
her passage from New York her roll was very easy and slow and not at all deep. She pitched very little and with no strain whatever. Isaac Newton, first assistant-engineer of the monitor. from a medallion portrait by Launt Thompson. At the time of Mr. Newton's death (September 25, 1884) he had been for several years Chief Engineer of the Croton Aqueduct. The plans which have been adopted for the new aqueduct were his, both in the general features and the details.-editors. Captain John Rodgers's report to the Secretary of the Navy, dated on board of the monitor Weehawken, January 22d, 1863, refers specially to the easy motion of his vessel: On Tuesday night, when off Chincoteague shoals, we had a very heavy gale from the E. N. E. with a very heavy sea, made confused and dangerous by the proximity of the land. The waves I measured after the sea abated; I found them twenty-three feet high. They were certainly seven feet higher in the midst of the storm. During the heaviest