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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 6: naval expedition against Port Royal and capture of that place. (search)
dition against Port Royal and capture of that place. Commander Rodgers. River steamers fitted and armed as gun-boats. commencementor. great sufferings of officers and men. reconnoissance by Commander Rodgers and Brigadier-General Wright battle of Port Royal. the battfit out armed vessels on the Western rivers. In May, 1861, Commander John Rodgers, U. S. N., was directed to report to the War Department, whalthough the vessels were under command of naval officers. Commander Rodgers proceeded at once to the West and purchased a number of riverar. and a reconnoissance in force was made of the harbor by Commander John Rodgers and Brigadier-General Wright, with four gun-boats. These dfficer learned that Fort Walker was being evacuated he sent Commander John Rodgers on shore with a flag of truce, and at half past 2 this offi unworthy attempt at revenge was made by the defeated foe. Commander Rodgers went into the house which had been used as headquarters, and
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 8: capture of Fernandina and the coast South of Georgia. (search)
r and along the coast. The larger vessels were sent to perform blockade duty, which at that moment, owing to the paucity of vessels, was very arduous. Commander John Rodgers was sent with the Seneca and Paulina to examine the enemy's defences on Tybee Island, in the Savannah River, and ascertained that all the works in that qu so that the expedition was enabled to accomplish its object without difficulty, and return unmolested. Several similar expeditions were sent out under Commander John Rodgers and others, which served to keep the enemy in a continual state of uneasiness and made our officers acquainted with all the surrounding land and water. must give a portion of the credit to those who served under his command. That Dupont was fortunate in his selection, the names of Captain C. H. Davis, Commanders John Rodgers, Drayton, C. R. P. Rodgers, Godon, Parrott, Steedman, Gillis, Prentiss, Lieutenants-Commanding Balch, Stevens, Ammen, Nicholson, Truxton, Rhind, Bankhead,
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 9: operations of Admiral Dupont's squadron in the sounds of South Carolina. (search)
ut the night passed quietly. At 11:15 the five steamers composing Commodore Tatnall's squadron attempted to pass down the river with some scows in tow. Commander John Rodgers, who lay at anchor in Wright River, and Captain Davis opened fire upon them, which they returned with spirit. The result of the engagement, which lasted required by this expedition was gained without loss of life or injury to the gun-boats. Surveys and examinations were made up Wright and Mud Rivers by Commander John Rodgers, and a great amount of good service done. The officers and boats' crews were in continual danger from the fire of bush-whacking Confederates, who were always ready for a fight. The names of Commanders John Rodgers, Drayton, C. R. P. Rodgers, Godon, Rhind, Stevens, Balch, Ammen, Truxton, Watmough, and Semmes, were conspicuous wherever a Confederate shot was heard, or wherever there was a chance to gain a point on the enemy. Heavy knocks were received by our gunboats from Confe
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 13: building a navy on the Western rivers.--battle of Belmont. (search)
om Cairo to the sea. Then the Army began to talk of improvising a Navy of their own, and the Navy Department sent Commander John Rodgers to St. Louis to superintend the construction of an army flotilla. While the North had its Ericsson, the West we of the vessels were ready to receive their armament. As the Army were now making great demands for gun-boats, Com. Rodgers was authorized to purchase three river steamers and convert them into war-vessels without plating. These were the firstwill appear from time to time in our pages — a more gallant set of men never trod the deck of a vessel-of-war. Foote, Rodgers, Eads and their assistants put forth all their energies to get the squadron ready for service, as the enemy were fortify (so-called), three wooden gunboats, the Taylor Lexington and Conestoga, which had been purchased and equipped by Commander John Rodgers, and thirty-eight mortars mounted on rafts. This service was of a somewhat anomalous character, since the gun-
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
n built in the South. The Weehawken, Captain John Rodgers, and the Nahant, Commander John Downes,tured in Warsaw Sound. it was reported to Captain Rodgers that a Confederate iron-clad was coming d war and at Drury's Bluff on the James, where Rodgers attacked the enemy's fortifications in the soinly the distinction was well deserved, for John Rodgers was one of the most gallant officers in thet have unnerved many clever officers. All of Rodgers' friends and associates in the Navy felt that, and enclosing the detailed reports of Captain John Rodgers and Commander John Downes of the affairar a third time on Fort Walker, I sent Commander John Rodgers on shore with a flag of truce. The haom the tops. At twenty minutes after two Captain Rodgers hoisted the flag of the Union over the dealuable officers of such young men. Commander John Rodgers, a passenger in this ship, going to tactions to the navigation of the river. Captain Rodgers was instructed to push his reconnoissance[8 more...]
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Letters relating to the battle of Port Royal and occupation of the Confederate forts. (search)
usquehanna had been brought to bear a third time on Fort Walker, I sent Commander John Rodgers on shore with a flag of truce. The hasty flight of the enemy was visible, and was reported from the tops. At twenty minutes after two Captain Rodgers hoisted the flag of the Union over the deserted post. At forty-five minutes after tg of which only could make such valuable officers of such young men. Commander John Rodgers, a passenger in this ship, going to take command of the steamer Flag, v duties of his special station; and I desire to pay the same tribute to Commander John Rodgers, who, being a passenger on board, had volunteered to serve on your stafrious injury to the boilers of the Flag had been repaired, I dispatched Commander John Rodgers to Tybee entrance, the mouth of Savannah River, to report to Commander e for sinking the proposed obstructions to the navigation of the river. Captain Rodgers was instructed to push his reconnoissance so far as to form. an approxima
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 34: (search)
the Navy Yard. attack on Drury's Bluff by Commander John Rodgers with the Galena, the Monitor, and other veshe James River between some gun-boats under Commander John Rodgers and a heavy battery on Drury's Bluff (a highold were the iron-clad (so-called) Galena, Commander John Rodgers, the Monitor, Lieutenant W. N. Jeffers, andt on board the Naugatuck, and disabled her. Commander Rodgers reported that the Galena was not shot-proof, eed were remedied in twenty-four hours. That Commander Rodgers and his officers showed the greatest courage, ch carried the divisional flag at her main. Commander Rodgers still thought that the Galena and Monitor couln with the enemy. This expedition convinced Commander Rodgers that an army could be landed on the James Rive that army Commander (afterwards Rear-Admiral) John Rodgers. seemed to be in danger of annihilation, the Navgineer, John Jordan. Iron-clad. Galena. Captain, John Rodgers; Lieutenant-Commander, L. H. Newman; Assista
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 35: operations of the North Atlantic Squadron, 1863. (search)
and asked the co-operation of the naval flotilla, at that time commanded by Commander A. Murray. The following gun-boats were assigned to this expedition: Delaware, Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant A. P. Foster; Shawsheen, Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant T. C. Woodward; Lockwood, Acting-Master G. W. Graves; Seymour, Acting-Master F. S. Wells, and the Army transports, Ocean Wave, Major Uliam; Allison, Gunner, E. A. McDonald, U. S. N.; Port Royal, Acting-Master G. B. Thompson, U. S. N.; Wilson. Captain Rodgers, and North State, Captain Berry. This flotilla left Newbern on the evening of the 12th of December. The Allison, Port Royal, Ocean Wave and Wilson were in the advance, under Colonel Manchester of the Marine Artillery, with orders to push ahead and reconnoitre, and in case of an attack, or the discovery of the enemy's batteries, to fall back on the heavier vessels. Colonel Manchester, in charge of the military expedition, anchored his steamers for the night and made preparations t