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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 12 4 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 10 6 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 7, 1862., [Electronic resource] 5 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 31, 1863., [Electronic resource] 5 5 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 28, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 4, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 20, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence. You can also browse the collection for Rodgers or search for Rodgers in all documents.

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Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence, Chapter 18: (search)
t to Longstreet's headquarters, distant not more than a mile and a half. With the officers of his Staff, as with the General himself, I was on excellent terms, and we used to assemble in a large tent which Major Latrobe, Major Fairfax, and Captain Rodgers occupied together, or else in a large hospital-tent in which the three doctors of the Staff-Cullen, Barksdale, and Maurychummed together with a most harmonious result. The mess arrangements at Longstreet's headquarters were always more satinions, from whom I knew I could always reckon on a warm welcome. Quickly did these pleasant evenings pass away, as we related the incidents by flood and field within our experience, or occasionally broke into song. In the latter respect Captain Rodgers was our chief performer; and when he was in thorough good-humour, he would enliven us with reminiscences of his stay among the Mormons, interspersed with select specimens of Brigham Young's psalmody. Whenever Latrobe's party fell short of l