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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 52 14 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 47 11 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 43 27 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 26 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 11 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 7 3 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 3 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for C. R. P. Rodgers or search for C. R. P. Rodgers in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Minor operations of the South Atlantic squadron under Du Pont. (search)
a, and Florida, from Bull's Bay to Fernandina. Detachments of vessels under Commander Drayton visited the inlets to the northward, including St. Helena Sound and the North and South Edisto, while other detachments, under Commanders John and C. R. P. Rodgers, examined the southerly waters, especially those about Tybee Roads and Wassaw and Ossabaw sounds. Nearly all the fortifications in these waters, with the exception of Fort Pulaski on the Savannah River, were found abandoned. The coast blocadron on the Charleston blockade, and the Navy Department had already taken steps to this end, having also in contemplation an active offensive movement against Charleston. The history of the projected attack on Charleston is given by Admiral C. R. P. Rodgers in a following article. The great broadside iron-clad New Ironsides had already arrived at Port Royal, and during January and February several monitors joined the station. The original Monitor, sent down for the same purpose at the clos
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Du Pont's attack at Charleston. (search)
Du Pont's attack at Charleston. by C. R. P. Rodgers, rear-Admiral, U. S. N.,--during the attack chief-of-staff. As Boston was regarded as the cradle of American liberty, where the infancy of the Union was nurtured, so Charleston, in later days, came to be considered the nursery of disunion. Therefore, during our civil war, no city in the South was so obnoxious to Union men as Charleston. Richmond was the objective point of our armies, as its capture was expected to end the war, but it excilots could not see the landmarks to direct their course, and the attack was necessarily deferred until the following day. On the 7th at noon the signal was made to weigh anchor; it was the earliest hour at which the pilots would Rear-Admiral C. R. P. Rodgers. From a photograph. consent to move, owing to the state of the tide. The movement was still further delayed by the Weehawken, whose chain became entangled with one of the grapnels of the cumbrous torpedo raft devised by Mr. Ericsso
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 1.7 (search)
South Atlantic blockading squadron. (January-July, 1863.) Rear-Admiral S. F. Du Pont, commanding. Commander C. R. P. Rodgers, Chief-of-Staff. Screw-frigate. Wabash, Com. T. G. Corbin, 1 150-pounder Parrott, 1 10-inch, 1 30-pounder Parrott, 42 9-inch. Screw-sloops. Pawnee, Com. G. B. Balch, 8 9-inch, 1 100-pounder Parrott, 1 50-pounder Dahlgren; Canandaigua, Capt. J. F. Green, 2 11-inch pivot, 1 150-pounder Parrott pivot, 3 20-pounder Parrotts, 2 12-pounder rifle howitzers, 2 12-pounder S. B. howitzers; Housatonic, Capt. W. R. Taylor, 1 11-inch, 1 100-pounder Parrott, 3 30-pounder Parrotts, 4 32-pounders, 1 12-pounder S. B. howitzer, 1 12-pounder rifle howitzer; Mohawk, Com. A. K. Hughes, 6 32-pounders, 1 24-pounder S. B., 1 12-pounder howitzer. Side-wheel steamer. Powhatan, Capt. S. W. Gordon, Capt. Charles Steedman, 7 9-inch, 1 100-pounder Parrott pivot, 1 11-inch pivot. Gun-boats. Wissahickon, Lieut.-Com. J. L. Davis, 1 150-pounder Parrott pivot, 1 20-poun