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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of South Mountain, or Boonsboro‘ (search)
eno's) consisted of four divisions under Cox, Willcox, Sturgis, and Rodman; or eight brigades — Scammon and Crook (Cox); Christ and Welsh (Willcox); Nagle and Ferrero (Sturgis); and Fair-child and Harland (Rodman). It had 29 regiments of infantry, 3 companies of cavalry, and 8 batters of Reno's corps. Willcox's arrived about noon, and Sturgis's and Rodman's between 3 and 4 o'clock, but there was no advance until 5 P. M. Tion; Willcox's on the right, supported by the division of Sturgis. Rodman's. division was divided; Fairchild's brigade was sent to the extremn was reenforced by the arriving divisions of Willcox, Sturgis, and Rodman; and Hooker's corps of three divisions was moving north of the Natihe Union brigade was more probably that of Colonel H. S. Fairchild, Rodman's division. See p. 558.--Editors. About 3:30 P. M. the advancehe mountain.--Editors. and that he left behind Harland's brigade of Rodman's division to guard his flank in his advance, since Harland reports
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Forcing Fox's Gap and Turner's Gap. (search)
s sent forward next morning (September 13th) to reconnoiter the passes of Catoctin Mountain, and Rodman's division of our corps went as his support. Through some misunderstanding, Rodman did not advaRodman did not advance on the Hagerstown road beyond Catoctin Mountain, but moved toward Franklin's line of march upon Crampton's Gap (southward). About noon of the 13th, I was ordered to march with my division to Middl McClellan himself met me as my column moved out of town, and told me of the misunderstanding in Rodman's orders, adding, that if I met him on the march I should take his division also along with me. left wing of Willcox's division, the latter taking ground a little more to the right and rear. Rodman was the last to arrive, and as part of Longstreet's corps again threatened to pass beyond my lefuntain, had reported to me for position, as I was senior on the line. Soon after the arrival of Rodman's division, the order came to advance the whole line, so as to complete the dislodgment of the e
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces in the Maryland campaign. (search)
, 39; w, 160; m, 5 == 204. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Edward Ferrero: 21st Mass., Col. William S. Clark; 35th Mass., Col. Edward A. Wild (w), Lieut.-Col. Sumner Carruth (w); 51st N. Y., Col. Robert B. Potter; 51st Pa., Col. John F. Hartranft. Brigade loss: South Mountain, k, 10; w, 83; m, 23 == 116. Antietam, k, 95; w, 368; m, 6 == 469. Artillery: D, Pa., Capt. George W. Durell; E, 4th U. S., Capt. Joseph C. Clark, Jr. Artillery loss: Antietam, k, 2; w, 4 == 6. Third division, Brig.-Gen. Isaac P. Rodman (in w). Staff loss: Antietam, w, 1. First Brigade, Col. Harrison S. Fairchild: 9th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Edgar A. Kimball; 89th N. Y., Maj. Edward Jardine; 103d N. Y., Maj. Benjamin Ringold. Brigade loss: South Mountain, k, 2; w, 18 == 20. Antietam, k, 87; w, 321; m, 47 == 455. Second Brigade, Col. Edward Harland: 8th Conn., Lieut.-Col. Hiram Appelman (w), Maj. John E. Ward; 11th Conn., Col. Henry W. Kings-bury (k); 16th Conn., Col. Francis Beach; 4th R. i., Col. William H. P. Ste
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of Antietam. (search)
without exposing the men to unnecessary loss. Rodman was directed to acquaint himself with the situ the exact range of the little Brigadier-General Isaac P. Rodman, mortally wounded at Antietam. tietam line, and it was probably from him that Rodman suffered the first casualties which occurred i burg, to fall upon Sedgwick. If, therefore, Rodman had been sent to cross at 8 o'clock, it is safhat might have followed an earlier attack. As Rodman died upon the field, no full report for his ditrengthen the line. These were soon joined by Rodman's division with Scammon's brigade, which had c. Colonel Fairchild, commanding a, brigade in Rodman's division, on the left of the line (which inc were taking a serious turn on the left. As Rodman's division went forward, he found the enemy beo Sturgis to come forward into the gap made in Rodman's. The troops on the right swung back in perfeormed on the curving hill in rear of them, and Rodman's had found refuge behind. Willcox's left, th[16 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 8.77 (search)
the bridge. The continuation of the road to Sharpsburg is seen on the right across the bridge.--Editors. At daybreak on the 17th I took the position assigned me, forming my line of battle on the crest of a ridge in front of the ford just mentioned. The ground, from my position to the creek, distant about five hundred yards, sloped gradually down to the crossing, just below which there was a wooded, bluff-like hill commanding the approach to the ford from the east. The ford by which Rodman crossed after Walker's forces were withdrawn.--Editors. Here I posted a battalion of skirmishers. While these dispositions, after a careful reconnoissance of the ground on both sides of the Antietam, were being made, the booming of artillery, at some distance on my left, warned us that the battle had begun. As the morning wore on the firing grew heavier and heavier, until Elk Mountain, to the eastward, gave back an incessant echo. About 9 o'clock an order was brought by a staff-office