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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 12 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 3 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Francis A. Roe or search for Francis A. Roe in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 10: naval engagement at South-West pass.--the Gulf blockading squadron in November, 1861. (search)
Secretary Welles in as great a state of excitement as his placid temperament would admit of. Give up the ship, Seward, said Mr. Lincoln, we will get another. And Mr. Seward consenting to do so, a telegram was sent to Lieut. Porter as follows: Give the Powhatan up to Capt. Mercer. April 6, 1861. Seward. While the ship was lying off Tompkinsville, Staten Island, waiting for the boat to return that had carried Capt. Mercer on shore, a swift little steamer came alongside, and Lieut. Roe of the Navy delivered Mr. Seward's telegram. Lieut. Porter read it, and decided that there was only one thing for him to do, and that was to disobey it. The artillery for the troops was on board the Powhatan, the steamer Atlantic, with the troops on board, he supposed had sailed at 12 o'clock, and was ten miles ahead of him. His stopping to restore the ship would make the expedition fail, his orders were from the President and he determined to obey them. He telegraphed back: I rece
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 19: battle of the forts and capture of New Orleans. (search)
bove that fort where its fire could no longer reach us. The ram, after having struck the Varuna gun-boat, and forced her to run on shore to prevent sinking, advanced to attack this ship, coming down on us right ahead. She was perceived by Lieutenant F. A. Roe just in time to avoid her by sheering the ship, and she passed close on our starboard side, receiving, as she went by, a broadside from us. The gun-boats of the enemy now fled up the river, and some of them were run on shore and set fire to do justice to each officer's merits by specifying his particular conduct in the battle, but the result of the conflict is the best evidence of the great good behaviour of them all. I must speak of the coolness and ability displayed by Lieutenant F. A. Roe, the executive officer of this ship. His station being on the bridge next to me enabled me to witness it. My eyesight is quite defective, especially at night, and I am compelled to rely on that of others. I was, therefore, obliged to giv
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 20: a brave officer's mortification.--history set right. (search)
lark; Boatswain, James Herold; Gunner, Wm. Parker. Steamer Owasco. Lieutenant-Commander, John Guest; Lieutenant, Chester Hatfield; Acting-Masters, T. D. Dabb and D. P. Heath; Assistant Surgeon, W. M. Leavitt; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, Richard Beardsley; Second-Assistant Engineer, W. K. Purse; Third-Assistant Engineers, J. A. Scott, C. H. Greenleaf and D. B. Egbert; Acting-Masters' Mates, W. M. Tomlinson and John Utter. Steamer Pensacola. Captain, Henry W. Morris; Lieutenants, F. A. Roe, Jas. Stillwell and C. E. McKay; Acting-Masters, Edw. Herrick, G. C. Shultze and E. C. Weeks; Acting-Ensign, A. H. Reynolds; Surgeon J. W. Taylor; Assistant-Surgeon, W. B. Dick; Paymaster, G. L. Davis; Chief Engineer, S. D. Hibbert; Second-Assistant Engineers, S. L. P. Ayres and C. H. Ball; Third-Assistant Engineers, J. L. Vanclain, G. W. Magee, J. T. Hawkins, F. G. Smith, Jr., and J. C. Huntly; First-Lieutenant of Marines, J. C. Harris; Acting-Masters' Mates, Chas, Gainsford, Jos. Kent, L
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 23: destruction of the ram Arkansas.--capture of Galveston.--capture of the Harriet Lane.--sinking of the Hatteras.--attack on Baton Rouge.--Miscellaneous engagements of the gun-boats. (search)
ack from the Confederate troops under General Breckenridge, to be supported by the ram Arkansas and the gun-boats Webb and Music. The Union vessels that were on the spot to meet the enemy and co-operate with the Army, were the Katahdin, Lieut.-Commander Roe, and the Kineo, Lieut.-Commander Ransom. The report that the enemy were approaching Baton Rouge for the purpose of attacking that place. was not an idle one, for on the morning of the 5th of April, at one o'clock, General Breckenridge atJames Entwistle and Samuel Gragg; Acting-Masters, Eben Hoyt and W. A. Maine; Acting-Masters' Mates, Louis R. Hammersly, C. F. Palmer, Edw. Culbert and J. C. Henry; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, W. L. Pynchon. Gun-boat Katahdin. Lieutenant-Commander, Francis A. Roe; Lieutenant, Nathamel Green; Assistant Surgeon, Somerset Robinson; Assistant Engineers, T. M. Dukehart, W. J. Reid, W. W. Heaton and John McIntyre; Acting-Ensigns, J. H. Hartshorn and J. G. Green; Acting-Masters' Mates, Geo. Leonar
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 39: Miscellaneous operations, land and sea.--operations in the Nansemond, Cape Fear, Pamunky, Chucka Tuck and James Rivers.--destruction of blockade-runners.--adventures of Lieutenant Cushing, etc. (search)
ry fast; but their commanders, rather than be captured, ran them ashore, after throwing overboard what munitions of war they had on board; and the Federal officers, finding it impossible to get them afloat, set them on fire to prevent the enemy receiving any benefit from them. The officers who made themselves particularly active in the performance of blockading duties, and who aided in the destruction of these steamers, were Commanders Pierce Crosby and William F. Spicer, and Lieutenant-Commander Francis A. Roe. Now and then, amid these exciting scenes, the indomitable Lieutenant Cushing came forward with some remarkable feat, more daring than important. Cushing was brave to recklessness, not seeming to care for danger, and his superior officers rather encouraged his wild adventures. In the month of February an idea struck Cushing that he would make an expedition to Cape Fear River, and capture the Confederate commander at Smithville, where there was a strong fort and a garris
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 40: (search)
Captain Smith benefitted by the directions so liberally showered upon him will appear when we chronicle his adventures in the sounds of North Carolina. The following vessels, arranged in the order given, off Edenton Bay, were under Captain Smith's command: Miami, Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant Charles A. French. Ceres, Acting-Master H. H. Foster. Commodore Hull, Act.-Master Francis Josselyn. Seymour. Second line. Mattabesett, Commander J. G. Febiger. Sassacus, Lieutenant-Commander F. A. Roe. Wyalusing, Lieutenant-Commander W. W. Queen. Whitehead, Acting-Ensign G. W. Barrett. The Miami was fitted with a torpedo to explode against the side of the ram, if opportunity offered. At 1 o'clock P. M. on the 5th of May, the Miami, Commodore Hull, Ceres and army transport Trumpeter got underway from the picket station off Edenton Bay, bound to the mouth of the Roanoke River, for the purpose of laying down torpedoes. Within a short distance of the buoy, at the mouth of
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Second line. (search)
Second line. Mattabesett, Commander J. G. Febiger. Sassacus, Lieutenant-Commander F. A. Roe. Wyalusing, Lieutenant-Commander W. W. Queen. Whitehead, Acting-Ensign G. W. Barrett.