hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz) 12 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 12 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz). You can also browse the collection for John Augustus Roebling or search for John Augustus Roebling in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 4 document sections:

Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), I. First months (search)
g! went a cannon on the right; then boom! boom! from the 32-pounders, and then, bang, boom, bang, pretty generally. In all the woods the troops were massed for the attack, waiting orders. We rode back to Headquarters, and, a moment after, Captain Roebling from General Warren's Staff, galloped up. He is the most immovable of men, but had, at that moment, rather a troubled air. He handed a scrap of paper. General Meade opened it and his face changed. My God! he said, General Warren has half my army at his disposition! Roebling shrugged his shoulders. The note was to the effect that General Warren had made a careful examination of the enemy's works, had altered his opinion of last evening, and considered an assault hopeless!!! Orders were at once issued to cease firing. We tried to take it all philosophically, but it was hard, very hard. Most of all to General Meade and General Humphreys, who really took it admirably, for both of them have excellent tempers of their own, which,
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), IV. Cold Harbor (search)
very judicious when he chooses), let us all try to keep our tempers more, and not swear so much. I know I give way myself; but it is unworthy. --Lyman's Journal. was there also, sitting under the tree, and there was a telegraph operator with his little portable instrument. Our lines were advancing, and there was an inexplicable silence along the skirmish line. . . . At 6.50 came an order for all the line to advance and to attack the enemy if found. . . . A little later, after seven, Major Roebling came in and reported he had discovered the enemy's new line of works, that ran along a high ground beyond the railroad, and that they were all there, with batteries in position. Soon after General Warren mounted, and we all rode to the front, over a wide cat-field past the works captured last evening, from which we were afterwards driven. In these there was one part where we seemed to have had an enfilade fire, for the Rebel dead lay there, one on top of the other. . . . We stopped und
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 7 (search)
ong the whole front of the new line and carefully examined it, accompanied by his Staff and by the taciturn Roebling. R. is a character, a major and aide-de-camp and engineer, and factotum to General Warren. He is a son of the German engineer, Roebling, who built the celebrated suspension bridge over the Niagara River. He is a light-haired, blue-eyed man, with a countenance as if all the world were an empty show. He stoops a good deal, when riding has the stirrups so long that the tips of hi over his aide's conduct, and kept asking unwary persons: Do you know how Mr. Woolsey escaped from guerillas? and, being answered No, would say: Why, thus! at the same time giving the unwary one a punch in the stomach, with his elbow. Then Major Roebling rode into a Rebel line of battle and had his orderly killed in his escape; Major Bingham was captured, but scared his guard so by telling him he was within our lines, that the man took to the bushes and left him. Lieutenant Dresser rode into
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), Index (search)
privations, 132; valuable qualities, 186; wearing down, 245, 271; deserters, 305, 310; appearance, 324, 360. Revere, Paul Joseph, 34. Review of troops, 9, 316, 318; 2d corps, 75; 9th corps, 261. Rice, James Clay, 109, 180. Rice's station, 352. Richmond, fall of, 343. Ricketts, James Brewerton, 98, 139, 144, 174, 176, 177, 184, 208, 232, 299. Riddle, William, 293. Ring, —, 172. Robertson's Tavern, 53, 54, 58. Robinson, John Cleveland, 104. Rockwell, —, Rev., 74. Roebling, John Augustus, 240. Roebling, Washington Augustus, 56, 168, 253; described, 240. Rogers, William Barton, 315. Rosencrantz, Frederick, 63, 64, 177, 183, 193, 202, 204, 210, 232, 244, 249, 277, 304, 306, 309, 315, 336; first meeting, 6; on the English, 268; major, 290. Roumania, 307. Rowley, William Reuben, 84, 164. Rush's Lancers, 130. Russell, David Allen, 128, 144, 177. Russell, Elizabeth, III. Russell, George Robert, III. Russell, Henry Sturgis, 161, 164, 165, 269. Russia