hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 16 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 10 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for John Arthur Roebuck or search for John Arthur Roebuck in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 2 document sections:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 17: London again.—characters of judges.—Oxford.—Cambridge— November and December, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
party; next day (being Sunday) to breakfast and pass the day with Roebuck, and to dine with Leader, the member for Westminster, to meet Lord Brougham and Roebuck; the next to dine with Sir Robert Inglis, the most distinguished Tory now in town; then with Sir Gregory Lewin; then wiWestminster. place, about six miles from town. I breakfasted with Roebuck, and then with him went to the member for Westminster. There were Captain E. J. Trelawney.—author of Adventures of a Younger Son,— Roebuck, Falconer,—late editor of the Westminster Review,—and myself. We one of the chiefs of the Tories. I have already written you that Roebuck is a person of great talent, force, and courage, with a quick, shobiography of John Stuart Mill, p. 91. (just returned from Egypt), Roebuck, Falconer, and myself. I was nearly dead with a cold, but I coulde characters of public men and events. Brougham said last week to Roebuck: They say there will be a contest between Durham and myself in th
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 24: Slavery and the law of nations.—1842.—Age, 31. (search)
u care to cultivate his friendship. He will advise with you about your travels in the country and in Ireland, where he has been. I also inclose a line for Joseph Parkes, a solicitor by profession, but one of the most learned lawyers in England, a strong Radical, a friend of the late Jeremy Bentham and Lord Durham, who takes a great interest in American affairs. He will take you to the Houses of Commons and Lords. Through him you may become acquainted with all the Radicals, —the Grotes, Roebuck, Charles Austin, Sir William Molesworth, Leader, &c. You will, of course, see Kenyon, who is a very good friend of mine. In a recent letter, introducing Dickens, he inquires after you. Dr. Bowring lives quite retired. He may invite you to breakfast. I often dined with Senior, or met him at dinner. He has remarkable powers, but is cold and logical. Who would have thought that he was the most interesting reviewer of Walter Scott's novels? Perhaps you have letters to Mr. Bates, You wi