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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 29, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of the Confederate flag. (search)
me when, to preserve that history from oblivion, some record should be made of it. The author of the new design adopted by the Confederate Congress was Major Arthur Lee Rogers. Confederate States Artillery, who, while disabled from active service in the field, devoted some of his leisure hours to improve the national emblem. After much attention to the subject and the laws of heraldry, Major Rogers, in January, 1865, submitted his design to Congress, and on the 13th of that month Mr. Semmes, of Louisiana, submitted the following bill in the Senate: A bill to establish The Flag of the Confederate States. The Congress of the Confederate States of Amering officers of the navy obtained, said committee unanimously recommended its adoption. Among the distinguished Confederate officers who approved the design of Major Rogers and recommended his proposed alteration in the national symbol of The Confederate States were: General Joseph E. Johnston, General S. Cooper, Lieutenant-Genera
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A confederation of Southern Memorial Associations. (search)
lled, 365. Rebel, was the Confederate soldier a, 247. Resolutions of 1798, 162 Richardson, Sergeant and Thos. E., 217. Richardson, Captain V. V. 1. Riddick, Captain, captured, 31. Rodgers, Judge Robert L, 222, 316. Rogers, Major, Arthur Lee, 89. Rogers, Colonel George T., 211. Rosser's Laurel Brigade, 101. Ruff, Lieutenant-Colonel, 300. Sage, B. J., 157, 169. Scott, Colonel W. C 259. Secession, pioneer of, 81; right of 169. Seven Days Battle, how begun, 90Rogers, Colonel George T., 211. Rosser's Laurel Brigade, 101. Ruff, Lieutenant-Colonel, 300. Sage, B. J., 157, 169. Scott, Colonel W. C 259. Secession, pioneer of, 81; right of 169. Seven Days Battle, how begun, 90. Seward, W. H., duplicity of, 188. Shaw, General Abbott D., 309 Sheridan's charge at Appomattox, 44; vandalism, 98. Shoes, Cowhide Moccasins for, 8. Slaves, Emancipation of, 197. Smith, General Francis H. 14. Smith, D. D., Rev. James P., 276. Spotsylvania Courthouse, Battle of, 2. South against the North, Case of the, 156. Southern Women, their glorious devotion, 377. Stamp Act of 1765, Declaration of rights under, 157. Starke, General, Wm. N. 3. Stephens,
Washington's opinion of "These People" of Massachusetts, &c. We are indebted to Capt. Arthur Lee Rogers, who commanded the Loudoun Artillery in the battle of Manassas, for the following unpublished letter from General Washington to Richard Henry Lee. This letter has been preserved in the Lee. family, who, though applied to by Banoroft, Irving and others for a copy for publication, have hitherto refused it, on the ground that it would be improper to give to the world a private letter from the Father of his Country reflecting upon any portion of it while the old Union endured. But now that "these people" have trampled the Constitution under foot, destroyed the Government of our fathers, and invaded and desolated Washington's own county in Virginia, there can be no impropriety in showing his private opinion of the Massachusetts Yankees. What would Mr. Everett say of this severe but just judgment on his own people of the man he has been eulogizing with his best rhetoric