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and a number wounded, with about fifteen prisoners. No tidings heard of the Second brigade until dark, when they arrived and reported that Colonel Johnson, commanding, had experienced great difficulty in crossing, and that in addition to the precipitous banks and absence of all boats or other means of transportation, the enemy were hovering on the river and harassing him as far as they could. He was, however, quite successful in driving them back. Yesterday a young man, calling himself Charles Rogers, dressed in full confederate uniform, came into our lines and expressed a desire to join our command. I suspicioned him, and, after a few questions, I was convinced that he was a spy. I threatened to shoot him, when he confessed that he had been lying, and that his name was Simon Blitz — in fact he convicted himself of being a spy. I hated to shoot him, although he deserved it. July 3d.--My regiment behaved very gallantly in yesterday's fight with the enemy, frequently having hand-to
st not only their commander, but thirty-four others killed and 111 wounded. The Second brigade, mounted men, Col. Cawthorn commanding, about 1,200 strong, lost twenty-one killed and seventy-five wounded. Col. Cawthorn was himself wounded. Major Charles Rogers, of St. Louis, adjutant of the brigade, was mortally wounded, and died the day after the battle. He was a gallant officer, and at all times vigilant and attentive to his duties, and fearless upon the field of battle. Your Excellency wise shot from under him, and was wounded himself slightly. General Lyon suffered in a similar manner. Captains Cavender, Cole, and Yates, each slightly, or at least not dangerously wounded; Lieutenants Brown and Johnson, and Corporals Conant and Rogers, more or less severely wounded. During this engagement, two companies of regulars were sent to the east side of the creek, to engage a force which was operating against Captain Wright's cavalry, sheltering themselves behind a fence. Captain P
st not only their commander, but thirty-four others killed and 111 wounded. The Second brigade, mounted men, Col. Cawthorn commanding, about 1,200 strong, lost twenty-one killed and seventy-five wounded. Col. Cawthorn was himself wounded. Major Charles Rogers, of St. Louis, adjutant of the brigade, was mortally wounded, and died the day after the battle. He was a gallant officer, and at all times vigilant and attentive to his duties, and fearless upon the field of battle. Your Excellency wise shot from under him, and was wounded himself slightly. General Lyon suffered in a similar manner. Captains Cavender, Cole, and Yates, each slightly, or at least not dangerously wounded; Lieutenants Brown and Johnson, and Corporals Conant and Rogers, more or less severely wounded. During this engagement, two companies of regulars were sent to the east side of the creek, to engage a force which was operating against Captain Wright's cavalry, sheltering themselves behind a fence. Captain P
Benjamin B. Mussey, Esq., Treasurer of the College; Hon. Israel Washburn, jun., Orono, Me.; Rev. Calvin Gardner, Waterville, Me.; Rev. Thomas J. Greenwood, Dover, N. H.; Rev. L. C. Browne, Hudson, N. Y.; Rev. Eli Ballou, Montpelier, Vt.; Silvanus Packard, Esq., Boston, Mass.; Rev. Hosea Ballou, 2d, D. D., Medford, Mass.; Timothy Cotting, Esq., Medford, Mass.; Hon. Richard Frothingham, jun., Charlestown, Mass.; Phineas T. Barnum, Esq., Bridgeport, Conn.; Thomas Crane, Esq., New York City; Charles Rogers, Esq., Philadelphia, Pa. Faculty. President, Hosea Ballou, 2d, D. D., Professor of History and of Intellectual Philosophy; John P. Marshall, A. M., Professor of Mathematics and of Physical Science; William P. Drew, A. B., Professor of Ancient Languages and of Classical Literature; Benjamin F. Tweed, A. M., Professor of Rhetoric, Logic, and English Literature; Enoch C. Rolfe, M. D., Professor of Physiology and Hygiene;--------, Professor of Moral Science and of Political Economy;---
lly was wounded in the hand. Capt. Coloman was mortally wounded, and has since died. General Rains' division was composed of two brigades — the first under Col. Weight, embracing infantry and artillery, strong, lost not only their commander, but thirty-four others killed and one hundred wounded. The Second brigade, mounted men, Colonel Cawthorn commanding, about twelve hundred strong, lost twenty-one killed and seventy-five wounded. Colonel Cawthorn was himself wounded. Major Charles Rogers of St. Louis, Adjutant of the brigade, was wounded, and died the day after the battle. Your Excellency will perceive that our State forces consisted of only five thousand two hundred and twenty-one officers and men; that of these no less than one hundred and fifty-six died upon the field, while five hundred and seventeen were wounded.--These facts attest more powerfully than any words can the severity of the conflict, and the tauntless courage of our brave soldiers. It is al