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Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 18 2 Browse Search
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s, with Alexander's and Henry's brigades, moved to within three miles of the Wisconsin River. In Mrs. Johnston's letter, already quoted, occurs the following: We got letters again last night, dated the 27th. Our men had hurried on to the scene of action, as soon as the express arrived, leaving their sick and baggage at Blue Mounds. They were constructing rafts, to cross the Wisconsin at that point, for it was much swollen with late rains. They expected to get over that day. Captain Rogers [Sixth Infantry] thought it impossible for foot-soldiers to overtake the mounted Indians; but Mr. Johnston was more sanguine. His letter is not here. I was requested to send it to town, or I could be even more particular, certainly much more graphical than I am. He hoped for a speedy termination of these affairs, as the enemy are now making for the Chippewa country, or will try to cross the Mississippi at Prairie du Chien. Mr. Johnston thinks they will be overtaken before they reach ei
uston, directed, the adjutant-general to have the army paraded and the general order read. This was too much for Huston, already boiling over with rage. He sat down, wrote a peremptory challenge to mortal combat, and handed it to his friend Colonel Rogers, with instructions to deliver it at once and accept of no delay. It so happened that this was a matter discussed by both parties with the Hon. Jefferson Davis, who makes the following statement to the writer: He says that Huston told him and Secretary earnestly opposed any change, and urged General Johnston to retain command. He did so until May 7th, when, worn down by care, fatigue, and physical suffering, he took the advice of his physicians, and turned over the command to Colonel Rogers. On the 18th of the same month, the President furloughed about two-thirds of the men, thus virtually disbanding the army; while the Mexican navy swept triumphantly along the coast, and the Indians pursued their cruel warfare upon the border
to their lands, as we do our own. We solemnly declare that all grants, surveys, or locations of lands, within the bounds herein before mentioned, made after the settlement of said Indians, are, and of right ought to be, utterly null and void. Lieutenant-Governor Robinson, a member of the committee that reported this declaration, says that General Houston assured the committee that he had himself seen the grant from the Mexican Government to the Cherokees, and that it was in the hands of Captain Rogers, at Fort Smith, in Arkansas; and avers that these assurances constrained the committee to unite in, and the Consultation to adopt, the report. Judge Waller, another member, confirms Lieutenant-Governor Robinson's statement. It is not now pretended that there was any such grant extant. Texas Almanac, 1860, p. 44. Sam Houston, John Forbes, and John Cameron, were appointed commissioners to negotiate with the Cherokees. But the Legislative Council, apparently distrusting this actio
l, Brazos Santiago, Burita on the Rio Grande, Matamoras, and Reynosa, but we have no means of ascertaining the number-say 14,000. I visited the camp of the Louisville Legion on Brazos Island; they are a fine body of men; they are now at Burita. Rogers Lieutenant-Colonel Jason Rogers, of the Louisville Legion-General Johnston's brother-in-law. was quite well. Very truly, your friend, A. Sidney Johnston. Point Isabel, Texas, July 10, 1846. Dear Hancock: When I last wrote to you we knLieutenant-Colonel Jason Rogers, of the Louisville Legion-General Johnston's brother-in-law. was quite well. Very truly, your friend, A. Sidney Johnston. Point Isabel, Texas, July 10, 1846. Dear Hancock: When I last wrote to you we knew nothing of our destination. The discharge of all the Louisiana regiments created great uneasiness among the Texas regiments, lest they, being six months men, should also be discharged. It was, however, decided otherwise. I have received orders to march, and will be en route this evening with my regiment, a fine body of riflemen, capable, from the instruction received here, of manoeuvring with great rapidity and precision; and I do not doubt that they will acquire distinction. The command
the wounded eagle. General Johnston's ideas of the conduct of life; of education. his Love of justice and breadth of view. books. opinions on the War; of Colonel Rogers; of General Taylor. his view of how the Mexican War should be conducted. letter to Preston, giving his estimate of General Taylor. reserve. gradual isolat with which he discriminated between what he saw, what he heard, and what he surmised or inferred. While I was with him, a report came that his friend, Colonel Jason Rogers, commanding at Monterey, was cooped up in the Black Fort, with a small garrison — the Louisville Legion — by an overwhelming force of Mexicans, to whom he must surrender. Hie said to me: They don't know Rogers, if they think he will surrender. He will hold the citadel to the last man, and then blow it up, before he will surrender. But I am glad he is there. He will beat the Mexicans, and has now a chance to win renown. Unfortunately, the Mexicans did not make the attempt. W
enerosity to the writer. his plantation, China Grove. Texas coast scenery. game. his family. occupation. manual labor. Warren D. C. Hall. the writer's boyish reminiscences of China Grove. General Johnston's relations with children. Irish John. shooting. close observation of the habits of animals. the crested Wood-Duck. the wounded eagle. General Johnston's ideas of the conduct of life; of education. his Love of justice and breadth of view. books. opinions on the War; of Colonel Rogers; of General Taylor. his view of how the Mexican War should be conducted. letter to Preston, giving his estimate of General Taylor. reserve. gradual isolation in his solitude. almost forgotten. exceptions. illustrations of his character and plantation-life from his letters. letters giving his views of education. preference for an American training. notions on rhetoric, mathematics-requirements for legal success. lessons of moderation. begins to lose hope and health. his forti