hide Matching Documents

Your search returned 30 results in 12 document sections:

1 2
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hutchinson, Thomas 1711-1780 (search)
t the colonies. The tempest of indignation which they raised was fearful to Hutchinson and his friends. When a committee waited upon him for an explicit answer as to the authenticity of his own letters, he replied, They are mine, but were quite confidential. This was not satisfactory, and the Assembly adopted a petition to the King for his removal. The writers of the letters were Thomas Hutchinson, Andrew Oliver (lieutenant-governor), Charles Paxton, Thomas Moffatt, Robert Auchmuty, Nathaniel Rogers, and George Rome. See Franklin, Benjamin. So eager was the King to see Governor Hutchinson, of Massachusetts, on his arrival in England in July, 1774, that he was hurried by Lord Dartmouth to the presence of his Majesty without time to change his clothes. He gave the King much comfort. He assured him that the Port Bill was a wise and effective method for bringing the Boston people into submission; that it had occasioned extreme alarm; that no colony would comply with their request
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays, The Puritan minister. (search)
Such were those pious worthies, the men whose names are identified with the leadership of the New England Colonies,--Cotton, Hooker, Norton, Shepard, the Higginsons, the Mathers. To these might be added many an obscurer name, preserved in the quaint epitaphs of the Magnalia :--Blackman, in spite of his name, a Nazarene whiter than snow ;--Partridge, a hunted partridge, yet both a dove and an eagle ;--Ezekiel Rogers, a tree of knowledge, whose apples the very children might pluck ;--Nathaniel Rogers, a very lively preacher and a very preaching liver, he loved his church as if it had been his family and he taught his family as if it had been his church ;--Warham, the first who preached with notes, and who suffered agonies of doubt respecting the Lord's Supper ;--Stone, both a loadstone and a flint stone, and who set the self-sacrificing example of preaching only one hour. These men had mingled traits of good and evil, like all mankind,--nobler than their descendants in some attri
was the former residence of Hooker, Shepard, and Mitchell, and afterwards of the Professors Wigglesworth; connected with his homestead were about seven acres of land, now the property of Harvard College. He m. 25 Nov. 1697 Margaret, dau. of President Rogers, granddau. of Gen. Daniel Denison, and wid. of Capt. Thomas Berry. She d. 7 June 1720, a. 54, and he m. 5 Ap. 1722 Sarah, wid. of William Harris, who survived him, and m. Hon. John Clark of Boston 15 July 1725, after whose death she contrachildren, all by his first w., were Margaret, b. 30 Sept. 1698, d. 22 Nov. 1702; Sarah, b. 12 Nov. 1700, m. Rev. Edward Wigglesworth 15 June 1726, and d. 9 Nov. 1727; Mary, b. 29 Oct. 1701; m. Major John Denison of Ipswich 9 Ap. 1719, and Rev. Nathaniel Rogers of Ipswich 25 Dec. 1728; John, b. 26 Sept. 1703, d. 31 Oct. 1704; Payton, b. 4 Aug. 1704, d. 7 Dec. 1704; Margaret, b. 31 July 1705, d. 16 June 1716; Anne, b. 5 July 1708, d. 30 July 1708; John, b. 21 June 1711, d. 4 July 1711. Rachel,
was the former residence of Hooker, Shepard, and Mitchell, and afterwards of the Professors Wigglesworth; connected with his homestead were about seven acres of land, now the property of Harvard College. He m. 25 Nov. 1697 Margaret, dau. of President Rogers, granddau. of Gen. Daniel Denison, and wid. of Capt. Thomas Berry. She d. 7 June 1720, a. 54, and he m. 5 Ap. 1722 Sarah, wid. of William Harris, who survived him, and m. Hon. John Clark of Boston 15 July 1725, after whose death she contrachildren, all by his first w., were Margaret, b. 30 Sept. 1698, d. 22 Nov. 1702; Sarah, b. 12 Nov. 1700, m. Rev. Edward Wigglesworth 15 June 1726, and d. 9 Nov. 1727; Mary, b. 29 Oct. 1701; m. Major John Denison of Ipswich 9 Ap. 1719, and Rev. Nathaniel Rogers of Ipswich 25 Dec. 1728; John, b. 26 Sept. 1703, d. 31 Oct. 1704; Payton, b. 4 Aug. 1704, d. 7 Dec. 1704; Margaret, b. 31 July 1705, d. 16 June 1716; Anne, b. 5 July 1708, d. 30 July 1708; John, b. 21 June 1711, d. 4 July 1711. Rachel,
rn in Foxboro, Mass., June 20, 1837. Among Mr. Elliot's ancestors were Major Eleazer Lawrence, Lieutenant Eleazer Lawrence, Captain Jonathan Wade, Lieutenant Nicholas White, Samuel Scripture, Marshal-General Edward Mitchelson, Marshal-General John Green, John Nutting, Zachariah Flicks, and Thomas Eliot, all soldiers in the King Philip's or other Colonial wars; also, Ensign John Whitman and Samuel Champney, soldiers in the King Philip's war, and deputies to the general court; also, Rev. Nathaniel Rogers, of Ipswich, Ruling Elder Richard Champney, of Cambridge, and William Pitt, high sheriff of Bristol, Eng. Thomas Eliot, above mentioned, was admitted a freeman of Swansea, Mass., February 22, 1669, and became a member of the Baptist church under Rev. John Myles; he was one of the proprietors of Taunton North Purchase. Of his ancestry no record has been found. He died in Rehoboth, Mass., May 23, 1700, and his wife Jane, whom he probably married about 1676 or 1677, died in Taunton
32. Raymond, Edward B., 27. Red River, La., 66, 67, 68. Reed, Joseph, 52. Registry of Deeds, 11. Rehoboth, Mass., 53. Request for a Wide and Deep Lock in Charles River Dam, 61. Revere, Mass., 17, 18. Revolutionary Landmarks, 61. Rice, Mary, 13. Richard Coeur de Lion, 56. Richardson, George L., 57. Richmond, 80. Richmond Hospital, 34. Richmond, N. H. 11. Richmond, Va., 33. Riley, Colonel, 66. Rindge, N. H., 48. Ring, David, Jr., 82. Rockland, Me., 58. Rogers, Rev., Nathaniel, 53. Roulston, John, 29, 30. Runey, George, 16. Runey, Horace, 16. Runey, John, 14, 18. Russ, Rev. Mr., 13. Russell District, 48. Russell, James, 43. Russell, Levi, 42, 46, 47. Russell, Philemon, 42. Russell, Philemon R., Jr., 42, 44, 45. Russell, Rebecca, 47. Russell's School, The, 42. Russell Street, 44. Russell, Kezia, 45. Russell, Kezia Teel, 45. Sabine Pass, 67. Sabine River, 81. Sakaski, Lizzie, 82. Sanborn, Albert L., 12, 15. Sanborn Avenue, 14.
the field like locusts, yet the sword of the Lord and Gideon shall prevail. Boston Gazette of 5 Oct. 1767, 653, 1, 2, Hyperion, by Josiah Quincy. As the lawyers of England all now decided, that American taxation by Parliament was legal and constitutional, the press of Boston sought support in something more firm than human opinion, and more obligatory than the acts of irresponsible legislation. The law of nature, said they, G. in Boston Gazette of 5 Oct. 1767. 653, 2, 2, Compare N. Rogers to Hutchinson, London, 30 Dec. 1767. is the law of God, irreversible itself and superseding all human law. It perfectly reconciles the true interest and happiness of every individual, with the true interest and happiness of the universal whole. The laws and constitution of the English Government are the best in the world, because they approach nearest to the laws God has established in our nature. Those who have attempted this barbarous violation of the most sacred rights of their countr
Gazette, as infamous libels on Parliament, the House showed only weariness of his complaints. W. S. Johnson to Gov. Pitkin, 26 Dec. 1767. W. S. Johnson to Jared Ingersoll, 30 Nov. 1767. Franklin to Galloway, 1 Dec. 1767, in Works, VII. 369. N. Rogers to Hutchinson, 30 Dec. 1767. Miscellaneous letters ascribed to Junius, x. XXIX. and XXXI. in Bohm's edition, II. 146, 193, 199. Bedford himself objected to Grenville's Test for America; Lyttelton to Temple, in Lyttelton, 741. and preferreanufactures and to cease importations. W. S. Johnson to R. Temple, 12 Feb. 1767. Franklin to W. Franklin, 19 Dec. 1767. The Americans, it was said with acrimony, are determined to have as little connection with Great Britain as possible; N. Rogers to Hutchinson, London, 30 Dec. 1766. and the moment they can, they will renounce dependence. W. S. Johnson to Governor Pitkin, 26 Dec, 1766. The partisans of the new Ministers professed to think it desirable that the Colonies should forget
nville and his friends W. S. Johnson's Journal, 15 Feb. 1768, and W. S. Johnson to Pitkin, 12 March, 1768. insisted on declaring Chap. XXXII.} 1768. Feb. meetings and associations like those of Boston illegal and punishable; and advised some immediate chastisement. I wish, said he, every American in the world could hear me. I gave the Americans bounties on their whale fishery, thinking they would obey the Acts of Parliament; and he now spoke for a prohibition of their fisheries. Nathaniel Rogers to Hutchinson, 27 Feb. 1768. Some of the Ministry went far beyond him, and were ready to proceed against Massachusetts with immediate and extreme severity. W. S. Johnson to Pitkin, 12 March, 1768; Journal, 18 Feb. 1768. When America was mentioned, nothing could be heard but the bitterest invectives of its enemies. That it must submit, no one questioned. While Hillsborough was writing Hillsborough to Bernard, 16 February, 1768. encomiums on Bernard, praising his own justice and
Hutchinson, 21 July, 1768. the Legislature seemed willing to restore Hutchinson to the Council, and on the first ballot he had sixty-eight votes where he needed but seventy-one. Compare Bernard to Hillsborough, 30 May, 1768; Hutchinson to Nathaniel Rogers, 7 June, 1768. He himself was the cause of his defeat. As the Chap. Xxxiii} 1768. May. Convention were preparing to ballot a second time, Samuel Adams rose to ask whether the Lieutenant-Governor was a pensioner; on which Otis, the othude, undutifulness and insolence. They will not come to a right temper, said Hutchinson, until they find that, at all events, the Parliament will maintain its authority, and that to oppose it any longer must prove their ruin. Hutchinson to N. Rogers, 30 or 31 May, 1768. Such were the Chap. Xxxiii} 1768. May. representations of men, on whom Hillsborough was eager to bestow signal marks of his confidence; having resolved to reward Bernard's zeal with the lucrative post of Lieutenant Govern
1 2