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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 2 Browse Search
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d. Captain Lafe Wilson fell near the depot and continued to discharge his revolver as long as life lasted. His last words were: Never surrender, boys. Captain J. B. McClintock fell severely wounded while urging his men to the charge. Captain S. G. Rogers, Company I, Eighteenth Kentucky, was wounded while gallantly resisting the foe. I cannot particularize further; it is enough to say that all my men fought like heroes and veterans in the face of a greatly superior force, as is evidenced by volunteers; Wm. Preston, Co. I, do.; John Crawford, Seventh Kentucky cavalry; Jerry Lawson, do.; Samuel Plunkett, do.; Lewis Wolff, Newport, Ky., Home Guards; Wm. S. Shipman, do.; Thomas Hartburn, Cincinnati, Pendleton Guards. wounded.--Capt. S. G. Rogers, Co. I, Eighteenth Kentucky, slightly; Thos. S. Duval, Home Guards, arm amputated; Hector Reed, Home Guards, left side; J. W. Minor, Seventh Kentucky cavalry, left lung; Jacob Carver, Co. E, Eighteenth Kentucky, thigh amputated; John Scott,
to the woods. They, however, gallantly re-formed and advanced by aim to the charge, led by Col. Rogers of the Second Texas. This time they reached the edge of the ditch, but the deadly musketryficers and men, some of their most distinguished officers falling, among whom was the gallant Col. Rogers, of the Second Texas, who bore their colors at the head of his storming column to the edge ofster into them from the moment of command--for ward — charge! shouted clearly from the brave Col. Rogers, (acting Brigadier,) of Texas. They tell me it was a noble exhibition of desperate daring. he ditch. It is an awful moment. They pause to take breath for a surge — a fatal pause. Texas Rogers, with the rebel flag in his left, revolver in his right, advanced firing, leaped the ditch, scalrs was as heavy as our own, proportionally. Among the prominent rebels who were killed were Colonel Rogers, of Texas, acting Brigadier; Colonel Johnston, of Arkansas, acting Brigadier, supposed to be
and canister until within fifty yards, when the Ohio brigade arose and gave them a murderous fire of musketry, before which they reeled and fell back to the woods. They, however, gallantly re-formed and advanced by aim to the charge, led by Col. Rogers of the Second Texas. This time they reached the edge of the ditch, but the deadly musketry-fire of the Ohio brigade again broke them, and at the word charge, the Eleventh Missouri and Twenty-seventh Ohio sprang up and forward at them, chasin three hours after the infantry entered into action they were completely beaten. You killed and buried one thousand four hundred and twenty-three officers and men, some of their most distinguished officers falling, among whom was the gallant Col. Rogers, of the Second Texas, who bore their colors at the head of his storming column to the edge of the ditch of Battery Robinette, where he fell. Their wounded, at the usual rate, must exceed five thousand. You took two thousand two hundred and s
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 153.-the fight near Memphis, Mo. (search)
Doc. 153.-the fight near Memphis, Mo. Missouri Democrat account. on the eighteenth of July, Major John Y. Clopper, in command of a detachment of Merrill's Horse, about three hundred strong, and a detachment of Major Rogers's battalion, Eleventh Missouri State militia, about one hundred strong, attacked and, after a very severe fight, entirely routed Porter and Dunn's combined bands of guerrillas, six hundred strong. At last accounts Major Clopper was still in swift march upon the forces of Porter, which had fled south, crossed the railroad and posted themselves for another fight in the vicinity of Florida, where they were doubtless attacked this morning by our forces, which crossed the road in pursuit of Porter yesterday. The fight took place near Memphis, Mo., and was brought on by a small advanced guard being fired upon by the enemy, who were concealed in heavy brush and timber across the road, where they had halted and chosen the ground for their fight. They were immedi
ellen, my Quartermaster, and Capt. Green Roberts, who acted as my Aids-de-Camp, were most active and fearless in carrying my orders, and the captains of companies cool and collected in the performance of them. Lieut.-Col. Duke led on his regiment, if possible, with more than his usual gallantry, and contributed, by the confidence with which he has inspired his men, to insure the success of the day. Lieut.-Col. Duke makes particular mention of the cool and determined manner in which Lieut. Rogers, commanding advanced guard, Captains Hutchinson, Castle, and Lieut. White, respectively commanding the three companies composing his division, behaved; in fact the conduct of both officers and men deserve the highest praise. I received every assistance from the patriotism and zeal of the neighboring citizens, amongst whom Major Duffey and Captain R. A. Bennett were preeminent. I have also to report that I have received a despatch from Gen. Forrest, stating that he has encamped with