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 61Abbott L., b. Aug. 19, 1849; d. Nov. 13, 1854.  62Edward P., b. Nov. 19, 1851.  63Caroline M., b. Mar. 28, 1855.  1Wade, Jonathan, was one of the early settlers at Ipswich, where he was freeman, 1634. His second wife was Mrs. Dorothy Buckley, whom he m. Dec. 9, 1660; and his third wife, Susannah----, d. Nov. 29, 1678. He had two bros., Nathaniel and Thomas. He d. Dec., 1683, leaving--  1-2Jonathan, b. 1637.  3Nathaniel.  4Thomas.  5 Prudence, m.1st, Anthony Crosby. 2d, Samuel Rogers.  6Susannah, m. William Symonds.  7Elizabeth, m. Elihu Wardwell. 1-2Jonathan Wade, jun., m. Deborah, dau. of Hon. Thos. Dudley, who d. Nov. 1, 1683, aged 39. He had by her--  2-8Dudley, b. Oct. 18, 1683.   He m., 2d, Elizabeth----, by whom he had--   Elizabeth, b. 1687.   Dorothy, b. Feb, 17, 1689.   He d. Nov. 24, 1689. 1-3Nathaniel Wade m. Mercy Bradstreet, Oct. 31, 1672; and d. Nov. 28, 1707. His widow d. Oct. 5, 1715, aged 68. His children were--  3-9Nathan
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 5: Bryant and the minor poets (search)
t classics, quickly set the young man apart; Bryant became established, fortunately, somewhat before American literary criticism had become self-consciously patriotic, indiscriminate, vulgar. England, too, long so important an influence on American judgments of American products, early accorded him a measure of honour and thanks. It is well known that Washington Irving secured the English reprinting of the volume of 1832 in the same year, with a brief criticism by way of dedication to Samuel Rogers, whose reading of the contents was the delight of that old Maecenas and Petronius Arbiter. It has, however, apparently not been observed that the entire contents of the volume of 1821 were reprinted, indeed in the same order, in Specimens of the American poets (London, 1822) with a noteworthy comment P. 190. on the lines Thanatopsis that there are few pieces, in the works of even the very first of our living poets, which exceed them in sublimity and compass of poetical thought. And
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
Rights of the colonies examined, the, 127 Rights of women, the, 288 Ripley, George, 333, 339, 340, 345 Rip Van Winkle, 221, 231, 256, 259 Rising glory of America, 182 Ritter, Karl, 187 River, the, 271 Rivington, James, 182 Roach, Miss, Chevillette, 317 Rob of the bowl, 311 Robbins, Abigail, 192 Robert of Lincoln, 272 Robertson, William, 29, 91, 97 Robespierre, 91 Robin, Abb6, 212 Robinson, J., 227 Robinson Crusoe, 284, 302 Rogers, Major, Robert, 217 Rogers, Samuel, 243, 255, 265 Rolfe, John, 225 Rolliad, the, 171, 174 Romeo and Juliet, 265 Roscoe, William, 255 Rose, Aquila, 161 Rose of Aragon, 231 Rosemary, 263 Rousseau, 102, 119, 187, 188, 199, 208, 213, 331, 346 Rowe, 116 Rowlandson, Mrs., Mary, 6, 7 Rowson, Mrs., Susanna, 179, 226, 285, 286 Royal America magazine, the, 123 Rules by which a great Empire may be reduced to a small one, 98, 140 Ruling passion, the, 179 Rural poems, 163 Rural Wanderer, the, 234
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 17: London again.—characters of judges.—Oxford.—Cambridge— November and December, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
Club (Pall Mall) was founded in 1824, by Sir Humphry Davy, Professor Faraday, Sir Francis Chantrey, Sir Walter Scott, Sir Henry Halford, Thomas Moore, Richard Heber, Sir Thomas Lawrence, and John Wilson Croker. Among its earliest members was Samuel Rogers; and among those who frequented it most was Theodore Hook. Nov. 22, 1838. my dear Mrs. Howe, Ante, Vol. I. pp. 164-16.—I should be cold, indeed, did I not cordially acknowledge your kind letter, which I have received by your nephew, Edwa have tried in vain at this club, where I now write, with a Lord of the Treasury snoring by my side, and where are all the literary men of London, to ascertain the authorship of an article in the last Edinburgh Review. I have asked Mr. Hallam, Mr. Rogers, and numerous literary men and M. P. s; and cannot find out. In short, nobody cares for these things. You see what a rambling letter I am writing,—if that can be called a letter which began as a note. I have been pleased to hear from your n
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
with Booth, a Chancery barrister; then went to Rogers's, where was a small party, —Mrs. Marcet, Mrs.try of Basil Hall! To-morrow I breakfast with Rogers. Samuel Rogers, 1763-1855. From 1802 untilSamuel Rogers, 1763-1855. From 1802 until his death he lived in St. James Place, London, looking into the Green Park. His courtesy and hospwn into a slur upon my host, I replied: Yes, Mr. Rogers, of benevolence to myself. As we were coming away, Rogers, Harness, Babbage, and myself were walking together down the narrow street in which Mer know the good friends she has left behind. Rogers is a friend of Wordsworth; but thinks he has we story you will find in a note to the Italy. Rogers wrote his note ten times over before he was sand Fox. In this judgment Lord W. concurred. Mr. Rogers has told me that Sir Robert Peel said he nevHallam speak of it repeatedly, and Harness and Rogers and a great many others whom I might mention, from the Marquis of Lansdowne, three from Samuel Rogers, one from Lord Langdale, Barry Cornwall, &[3 more...]
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 16, 1839. (search)
Jan. 16, 1839. This London is socially a bewitching place. Last evening I first dined with Booth, a Chancery barrister; then went to Rogers's, where was a small party, —Mrs. Marcet, Mrs. Austin, Miss Martineau, Mr. and Mrs. Lyell, Mr. and Mrs. Wedgewood, Harness, Rev. William Harness. and Milman. We talked and drank teao dogmatically on questions of policy and government. He exhorted me to write a book on England, to revenge my country of Basil Hall! To-morrow I breakfast with Rogers. Samuel Rogers, 1763-1855. From 1802 until his death he lived in St. James Place, London, looking into the Green Park. His courtesy and hospitality have been He exhorted me to write a book on England, to revenge my country of Basil Hall! To-morrow I breakfast with Rogers. Samuel Rogers, 1763-1855. From 1802 until his death he lived in St. James Place, London, looking into the Green Park. His courtesy and hospitality have been commemorated by many visitors from the United States
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 23, 1839. (search)
oet of this fair country. I believe I have often written you about Rogers. Of course, I have seen him frequently in society; never did I like him till I enjoyed his kindness at breakfast. As a converser Rogers is unique. The world, or report, has not given him credit enough for hermined not to be drawn into a slur upon my host, I replied: Yes, Mr. Rogers, of benevolence to myself. As we were coming away, Rogers, HarneRogers, Harness, Babbage, and myself were walking together down the narrow street in which Miss M. lives, when the poet said: Who but the Martineau could hrite to her, to let her know the good friends she has left behind. Rogers is a friend of Wordsworth; but thinks he has written too much, and last work, Yarrow Revisited, and other Poems, 1835.—dedicated to Rogers,—on the saying of the monk who had sat before the beautiful picturey, note 241. This same story you will find in a note to the Italy. Rogers wrote his note ten times over before he was satisfied with it; Word
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 27, 1839. (search)
told you that Earl Grey said to Lord Wharncliffe, on the evening of B.'s speech on the Reform Bill, that it was the greatest speech he ever heard in his life; and his life covered the period of Pitt and Fox. In this judgment Lord W. concurred. Mr. Rogers has told me that Sir Robert Peel said he never knew what eloquence was till he heard B.'s speech on the abolition of slavery in the West Indies. Do not listen to the articles and the reports that Lord B. is no speaker. He is most eloquent; anishaw, who is now blind, and who was the bosom friend of Sir Samuel Romilly, has had it read to him, and says that Lord Holland calls it the most important historical work since Gibbon. I have heard Hallam speak of it repeatedly, and Harness and Rogers and a great many others whom I might mention, if I had more time and I thought you had more patience. Bulwer has two novels in preparation—one nearly completed—and is also engaged on the last two volumes of his History of Greece. This work se
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 22: England again, and the voyage home.—March 17 to May 3, 1840. —Age 29. (search)
to renew his association with Austin, Sydney Smith, Milman, Hayward, Milnes, Inglis, the Grotes, Rogers, and others. He failed to see Lord Brougham, who was at the time absent. On his last day in Lohe Wortleys, &c. But I must stop. I must go now to breakfast with Sydney Smith; to-morrow, with Rogers; next day, with dear Sir Robert Inglis; the next with Milnes. But I must be off. Good-by. I shAmerica; and hope, before I touch New York, to read him entire. This morning I breakfasted with Rogers,—old Rogers, as he is called. It was delightful to listen to his wisdom-dropping voice; but I sRogers, as he is called. It was delightful to listen to his wisdom-dropping voice; but I started when he said Manzoni's Promessi Sposi is worth ten of Scott's novels. Say thirty! said I. Well, thirty, said the wise old man; I only said ten for fear of shocking you. And this is the judgm achievement. I still keep your Wellesley's poems; I have seen them on the tables of Hallam and Rogers. I leave London early Friday morn, and on Saturday descend upon the sea. Before I go, I shall
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 24: Slavery and the law of nations.—1842.—Age, 31. (search)
cs, history, and the real. You and he will have many sympathies. But you would not sympathize with the imaginative, graceful, refined intellect of my friend Milnes,—--perhaps not with the epigrammatic, caustic, highly-finished sculptured mots of Rogers, or the brilliant, argumentative wit of Sydney Smith. I like to find good in every thing; and in all men of cultivated minds and good hearts-thank God I—there is a great deal of good to be found. In some it shows itself in one shape, and in som found it on a scrap of newspaper, in the hands of two Irish women, soiled and worn; and I was at once touched by it. Think, my dear friend, of this soul, into which you have poured the waters of life. Such a tribute is higher than the words of Rogers, much as I value them. The death of Dr. Channing is a great sorrow,—not so much for his friends as for truth, humanity, and benevolence. He died Oct. 2, at Bennington, and was buried at Mount Auburn. I passed last evening with his daughter, <
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