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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 18 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for St. George Rogers or search for St. George Rogers in all documents.

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dd to the horror of the scene, the wounded were now pouring in rapidly, covering the floors of Mr. Rogers's dwelling and the smooth lawn in its front. One poor fellow had been shot through the head, the Mayor or by himself. The following committee was appointed by the chairman: Colonel St. George Rogers, of Florida; Lieutenant-Colonel William Munford, Colonel R. M. Nimmo, Peyton Johnston, In accordance with this disposition, Gen. Patrick deployed the Twenty-first New-York, under Colonel Rogers, as skirmishers on the right, and the Thirty-fifth New-York, under Col. Lord, on the left, selled to retreat in disorder. While the main attack was going on at the fence referred to, Col. Rogers, with his own, and Lieut.-Col. Gates's regiments — the Twentieth and Twenty-first New-York vo anticipating the enemy, who made a furious rush to seize this fence, but were driven back. Colonel Rogers was thus enabled to take the enemy in flank, and also to pick off their cannoneers and silen
xperience, I have never heard any thing like the firing on our left. It was also heavy on the centre and right, but the principal fighting seemed to be on the left, where the Sixteenth and Seventy-first Indiana and Eighteenth Kentucky were stationed. The musketry was sharp, quick, rattling, crashing, almost deafening, surpassing any thing I had ever conceived in the way of infantry firing. To add to the horror of the scene, the wounded were now pouring in rapidly, covering the floors of Mr. Rogers's dwelling and the smooth lawn in its front. One poor fellow had been shot through the head, and was just breathing his last. Another was most shockingly disfigured in the face. Another had lost his good right hand, and was nursing the bloody stump. Another-but why dwell upon these sickening details? They are the same in every battle. About nine o'clock, a number of mounted civilians, who had ridden out to see the fight, took the alarm, and turning their horses' heads in the direct
f Richmond was ever surrendered to our enemies it should not be by a descendant of its founder. He would sooner die than surrender our city, and if they wished a Mayor who would surrender the city, they must elect another in his place. Governor Letcher was then called on, and heartily approved the objects of the meeting. He said that the city should never be surrendered by the President, by the Mayor or by himself. The following committee was appointed by the chairman: Colonel St. George Rogers, of Florida; Lieutenant-Colonel William Munford, Colonel R. M. Nimmo, Peyton Johnston, William G. Paine, Lieutenant C. O. Lamotte, of South-Carolina. The committee was requested to meet at the City Hall at nine o'clock to-morrow (Saturday) morning, for the purpose of receiving the names of all persons who are disposed to unite under the organization recommended by the proclamation of the Governor. The meeting then adjourned. Remarks of the press. We are proud of the
and this in turn by Doubleday's brigade, with the same interval. In accordance with this disposition, Gen. Patrick deployed the Twenty-first New-York, under Colonel Rogers, as skirmishers on the right, and the Thirty-fifth New-York, under Col. Lord, on the left, supporting the former with the Twentieth New-York, Col. Gates, and ajor Grover. In this attempt the enemy lost heavily, and were compelled to retreat in disorder. While the main attack was going on at the fence referred to, Col. Rogers, with his own, and Lieut.-Col. Gates's regiments — the Twentieth and Twenty-first New-York volunteers, of Patrick's brigade — rendered most essential service bylding a fence bounding the north-east side of the same corn-field, anticipating the enemy, who made a furious rush to seize this fence, but were driven back. Colonel Rogers was thus enabled to take the enemy in flank, and also to pick off their cannoneers and silence a battery which was on their right and behind their main body.