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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 95 3 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 33 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 4 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 3 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Alfred Roman or search for Alfred Roman in all documents.

Your search returned 49 results in 6 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Flag Presentation to the Washington Artillery. (search)
our pages has prevented us from giving an earlier notice of the interesting occasion, or giving now any of the details save a condensed report of the Address of Judge Roman in presenting to the battalion, on behalf of General Beauregard, a historic Confederate flag. To say that Colonel J. B. Richardson presided on the occasion—thaeived the flag—and that the whole affair was arranged by a well-selected committee of the battalion—is to give assurance that it was a splendid success.] Judge Alfred Roman's address Judge Roman, after expressing the pleasure with which he, on the part of General Beauregard, now absent from the city, had been chosen to speakJudge Roman, after expressing the pleasure with which he, on the part of General Beauregard, now absent from the city, had been chosen to speak to the battalion on so interesting a mission, proceeded to speak of the early events of the war, when the armies of the North and the South were confronting each other on the opposite banks of the Potomac. He spoke also of the exciting and dramatic events of the battle of Bull Run; how the first Confederate flag, of the stars and<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraph. (search)
Volumes I. and II. New York: Harper & Brothers. 1884. Sold only by subscription. We have received our copy through Rev. 1. T. Wallace, Agent, Richmond, Va. We have not yet had time to give this book, as we propose doing, a careful reading, and we must reserve until then any full notice or review of it. But we may say now that no narrative of the Military Operations of General Beauregard, even fairly well written, could fail to be of interest, while one written by the facile pen of Judge Roman, aided by General Beauregard's personal supervision, as well as by his papers, in its preparation, could not fail to be of absorbing interest and great historical value. A gallant soldier and accomplished engineer in the old United States army, one of the brightest of the galaxy of young officers who so gallantly distinguished themselves in the Mexican war, and certainly among the most accomplished soldiers which the late war produced, General Beauregard's contribution to our history h
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Military operations of General Beauregard. (search)
litary operations of General Beauregard. By Alfred Roman. A Review by Colonel Wm. Allan, formerlysumed less directly the responsibility for Colonel Roman's work. The book is not so much a historyd. Such are the facts. Let us see what Colonel Roman makes of them. On the rather slim basis o simply his duty in holding the dispatch. Colonel Roman goes on to say: We assert it as an incon Beauregard's own action after Manassas. Colonel Roman's claim is that if Johnston had been ordern to demolish Patterson and McClellan, and Colonel Roman informs us distinctly that Beauregard oppoposition was made, but surely, to speak of Colonel Roman's course as unkind and unfair, in bitterlyd so, too, was Beauregard for a time. But Colonel Roman, through many pages, labors to prove that ard to see how so intelligent a soldier as Colonel Roman can complain of this, but he does. Generapleasant to contemplate these than to read Colonel Roman's incessant criticisms of distinguished Co[1 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Cruise of the Nashville. (search)
before dawn of the 19th, we discovered their position by the great number of rockets which they were sending up to signal the fact that our presence was known. This, together with the fact that the stone fleet had been sunk in the channel, leaving only the Maffitt's channel open, and not knowing how far even that was obstructed, made me conclude not to attempt to run in. With an exhausted crew and short of coal, I put back and ran clear of the blockaders. At daylight on the 19th made Cape Roman, steaming close in to land, and tracked up the beach, intending to try to enter Georgetown, S. C.; but seeing the smoke of two steamers to the northward, I stopped the engines and made ready to destroy the vessels on their approach, as we were in a condition too exhausted to run successfully. Fortunately, the smoke of the blockaders disappeared on the horizon, and we steamed on up to the entrance of Georgetown, but on going in got aground on the bar. Sending out a boat to take soundings,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Military operations of General Beauregard. (search)
e result of the struggle. We learn from Colonel Roman's book that the Confederate Government conr his cabinet, which resulted, as shown in Colonel Roman's book, in a sort of permanent antagonism,uregard as they evolve out of the pages of Colonel Roman. At manassas, says Colonel Roman, Generesent itself to the mind of the reader of Colonel Roman's book. If, after the battle of Manassas,e—the battle of Manassas. The resume of Colonel Roman's views about the non-execution of Generalugh Maryland to the rear of Washington. Colonel Roman observes: In rejecting this plan (the orig, on the Mississippi. The President, says Colonel Roman, gave but little weight to these suggestioNew Orleans, General Beauregard, continues Colonel Roman, emphasized, both orally and in writing, tield of Manassas, where, as we are told by Colonel Roman, there was not twenty-four hours food for State troops hastily assembled were, says Colonel Roman, partly equipped, without drill and badly [6 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Military operations of General Beauregard. (search)
er circumstances. It is difficult to read Colonel Roman's narrative without being convinced that Ge insalubrity of that locality would, says Colonel Roman, increase as the season advanced, and thatelo, as before stated; and we believe that Colonel Roman correctly says that no other retreat durins. This plan is minutely transcribed in Colonel Roman's book, because, as he says, of its strate by General Beauregard, weeks before, says Colonel Roman, was clearly demonstrated. Had our untenag the subject, it gratifies us to say that Colonel Roman shows General Beauregard to have remained ing to the termination of their career. Colonel Roman does not leave us unacquainted with the feeral Beauregard, and minutely described by Colonel Roman in his work, seem to have been considered eficient in feasibility. But, as observes Colonel Roman, war is essentially a contest of chances, e fate. We are convinced, after reading Colonel Roman's book, that General Beauregard had in him[7 more...]