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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 9 5 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 5 1 Browse Search
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley) 3 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Samuel Romilly or search for Samuel Romilly in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 17: London again.—characters of judges.—Oxford.—Cambridge— November and December, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
uished statesman. now in Paris. Sir Robert Inglis expressed himself to-night in terms of the highest admiration of Dr. Channing's Texas, which is a good deal from such a churchman. I passed a very pleasant evening last week—till long past midnight—with Mr. and Mrs. Basil Montagu. Basil Montagu, 1770-1851. He was educated at Cambridge, and called to the bar in 1798. He made the Law of Bankruptcy, both in practice and as a writer, his specialty in the profession. He co-operated with Romilly in the movement to abolish capital executions for minor offences, and was active in the Temperance reform. He was an enthusiastic student of Bacon, editing the works, and writing the life of the philosopher. His edition was the text of Macaulay's famous article in the Edinburgh Review. His daughter married Bryan Waller Procter, who, as an author, adopted the pseudonym of Barry Cornwall, and died in 1874, at the age of eighty-seven. Adelaide Anne Procter, 1825-1864, was Mr. Procter's dau
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, December 5. (search)
uished statesman. now in Paris. Sir Robert Inglis expressed himself to-night in terms of the highest admiration of Dr. Channing's Texas, which is a good deal from such a churchman. I passed a very pleasant evening last week—till long past midnight—with Mr. and Mrs. Basil Montagu. Basil Montagu, 1770-1851. He was educated at Cambridge, and called to the bar in 1798. He made the Law of Bankruptcy, both in practice and as a writer, his specialty in the profession. He co-operated with Romilly in the movement to abolish capital executions for minor offences, and was active in the Temperance reform. He was an enthusiastic student of Bacon, editing the works, and writing the life of the philosopher. His edition was the text of Macaulay's famous article in the Edinburgh Review. His daughter married Bryan Waller Procter, who, as an author, adopted the pseudonym of Barry Cornwall, and died in 1874, at the age of eighty-seven. Adelaide Anne Procter, 1825-1864, was Mr. Procter's dau
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
ght to be happy in his honorable fame. His publisher, Bentley, is about to publish a second edition in two volumes; and he told me that he regarded the work as the most important he had ever published, and as one that would carry his humble name to posterity. Think of Bentley astride the shoulders of Prescott on the journey to posterity! Milman told me he thought it the greatest work that had yet proceeded from America. Mr. Whishaw, who is now blind, and who was the bosom friend of Sir Samuel Romilly, has had it read to him, and says that Lord Holland calls it the most important historical work since Gibbon. I have heard Hallam speak of it repeatedly, and Harness and Rogers and a great many others whom I might mention, if I had more time and I thought you had more patience. Bulwer has two novels in preparation—one nearly completed—and is also engaged on the last two volumes of his History of Greece. This work seems to have been a failure. I see this flash novelist often: we p
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 27, 1839. (search)
ght to be happy in his honorable fame. His publisher, Bentley, is about to publish a second edition in two volumes; and he told me that he regarded the work as the most important he had ever published, and as one that would carry his humble name to posterity. Think of Bentley astride the shoulders of Prescott on the journey to posterity! Milman told me he thought it the greatest work that had yet proceeded from America. Mr. Whishaw, who is now blind, and who was the bosom friend of Sir Samuel Romilly, has had it read to him, and says that Lord Holland calls it the most important historical work since Gibbon. I have heard Hallam speak of it repeatedly, and Harness and Rogers and a great many others whom I might mention, if I had more time and I thought you had more patience. Bulwer has two novels in preparation—one nearly completed—and is also engaged on the last two volumes of his History of Greece. This work seems to have been a failure. I see this flash novelist often: we p
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, chapter 30 (search)
ldon, Mr. Justice Buller, Sir John Mitford, Lord Ellenborough, Lord Thurlow, Sir William Alexander, Mr. Fearne, Chief Baron Eyre, Lord Camden, Mr. Hargrave, Sir Samuel Romilly, Lord Loughborough (Wedderburne),—judges and lawyers who were engaged in the courts during the last quarter of the last century and the first quarter of thend collections, and three volumes under the fanciful title of Jurisconsult Exercitations. See 29 London Law Mag., 75-108; also Annual Obituary for 1821. Sir Samuel Romilly. This is the first time [Brodie v. St. Paul, 1 Vesey, Jr., 328] we meet the name of Sir Samuel Romilly in these Reports. He was born in 1757, and was, tSir Samuel Romilly in these Reports. He was born in 1757, and was, therefore, thirty-four years of age. In the succeeding volumes of Vesey, we shall witness the extent and variety of his professional labors. During the short-lived administration of Mr. Fox in 1806, he was Solicitor-General. He distinguished himself in Parliament by his unwearied efforts for the reform of the law. He died in 1818