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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 94 4 Browse Search
John F. Hume, The abolitionists together with personal memories of the struggle for human rights 34 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 14 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 2 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 8 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 6 0 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Theodore Roosevelt or search for Theodore Roosevelt in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Fitzhugh Lee. From the Times-dispatch, January 5, 1908. (search)
e fame as a fighter surpassed that of any other general in the army. Applications poured in upon him from all parts of the country for places upon his staff. One of them, I have heard, came from the then Assistant Secretary of the Navy, Theodore Roosevelt, who thought General Fitz would certainly be where the fighting would be fiercest and most glory would be won. President McKinley had promised General Fitz if Havana was attacked he should lead the forces, but the politicians feared if sd he was side-tracked in Florida. Shafter was chosen for the chief command because it was thought perhaps he would probably be even less formidable in peace than in war. The scene shifted to Santiago, which became the chief seat of war. Mr. Roosevelt, we remark in passing, with that quick penetration for which he is so noted, foresaw the plans of the politicians, and sought glory with the Rough Riders from the ranches of the West. If these same politicians had known all (esse et posse) t