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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery. 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 1, 1862., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Rope or search for Rope in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
864, by George E. Pond—Campaigns of the civil war, XI. A Review, by Colonel Wm. Allan. This is one of the most interesting of the Scribner series and is valuable because of the clearness with which it is written, and of the amount of research it shows in bringing together information from widely scattered sources, concerning an exciting and important campaign. As history, too, it is far better than General Doubleday's Gettysburg, though it is far behind the best numbers of the series. Mr. Rope's Army under Pope, and General Palfrey's Antietam, for instance. It is mainly a narrative of the Federal operations in the Valley in 1864, only describing and discussing the Confederate side, so far as is necessary to the comprehension of the achievements of the Union armies. While, too, Mr. Pond's language is temperate, and he aims at fairness, his bias is very evident, and often converts his pages into a defence of, or panegyric upon the Federal commanders. He is not careful to state t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Shenandoah Valley in 1864, by George E. Pond—Campaigns of the civil war, XI. (search)
864, by George E. Pond—Campaigns of the civil war, XI. A Review, by Colonel Wm. Allan. This is one of the most interesting of the Scribner series and is valuable because of the clearness with which it is written, and of the amount of research it shows in bringing together information from widely scattered sources, concerning an exciting and important campaign. As history, too, it is far better than General Doubleday's Gettysburg, though it is far behind the best numbers of the series. Mr. Rope's Army under Pope, and General Palfrey's Antietam, for instance. It is mainly a narrative of the Federal operations in the Valley in 1864, only describing and discussing the Confederate side, so far as is necessary to the comprehension of the achievements of the Union armies. While, too, Mr. Pond's language is temperate, and he aims at fairness, his bias is very evident, and often converts his pages into a defence of, or panegyric upon the Federal commanders. He is not careful to state t