Your search returned 3,669 results in 695 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Book notices. (search)
anded the numbers which Northern generals and Northern writers attribute to him, then the story of Gettysburg and of the war would have been far different. Sherman's Historical raid. By H. V. Boynton. Cincinnati: Wilstach, Baldwin & Co. The author has kindly sent us a copy of this able and scathing review of Sherman's Memoirs, and we have read it with very great interest. He shows most conclusively from the official records that Sherman has done great injustice to Grant, Buell, Rosecrans, Thomas, McPherson, Schofield, and almost every other officer to whom he alludes in his book, and he carries the war into Africa by severely criticising Sherman's generalship, upon some of his most important fields, and showing that he was actually saved from terrible disaster again and again by the very men whom he now disparages. We cannot, of course, accept all that General Boynton has written; but we rejoice to see this well merited rebuke to the General of the Army who not only mak
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The treatment of prisoners during the war between the States. (search)
t permitted to see a human being, when her mind gave way under the terrible treatment. The surgeon protested against this vicious cruelty; still it was continued, until the very sight of the poor creature was frightful. So she continued until Rosecrans was removed. After Rosecrans was broken down in the army, like Burnside, he tried to retrieve his lost fortunes by cruelty, but failed. Neither the release of Strachan from the penalties of the court-martial for his participation in the McNeiRosecrans was broken down in the army, like Burnside, he tried to retrieve his lost fortunes by cruelty, but failed. Neither the release of Strachan from the penalties of the court-martial for his participation in the McNeil murders, and robbery and rape of Mrs. Mary Humphreys, nor his barbarity could save him from the contempt of the Radicals. After his brutalities in these cases, the Democrats loathed him, and he now lies hidden among the rubbish of the war, 'mid the remnants of abandoned barracks, rusty guns and broken wagons, to be heard of no more forever. Mrs. Beatty was tried by court-martial and acquitted, but will wear the marks of cruelty to the grave. One of the most horrible murders of the State
rth, toward Louisville, they are massed in considerable force at different points convenient for concentrating them. I do not doubt that the Federal Government is augmenting their force in Kentucky in this direction to the extent of their ability. The inclosed letter will serve to show the disposition they are making of different army corps, which have been elsewhere employed. As to the estimate of their forces, I suppose it is a gross exaggeration. With the addition of Nelson's and Rosecrans's columns their force on this immediate line I believe ought not to be estimated over 65,000 men. Our returns at this place show a force of between 18,000 and 19,000, of which about 5,000 are sick (about 8,600 at Nashville), and our effective force is under 13,000 men. The volunteers, I hear, are turning out well, but the time taken up in procuring arms has thus far prevented much accession to our force from that source .. To the Hon. J. P. Benjamin, Secretary of War. headquar
infantry the battle of Murfreesboro or Stone River. Notwithstanding the superior numbers by which he was opposed under Rosecrans, the victory for a time was his. A bloody repulse of Hardee at the moment when the latter was thought to be giving the continued to occupy a great part of Tennessee until the following September, when on the 19th and 20th he again fought Rosecrans at Chickamauga. Here his victory was decisive, as at the close of the second day's fight he occupied the battle-field, and Rosecrans retreated to Chattanooga. Failure to pursue and follow up his victory gave Rosecrans time to fortify and restore the morale of his shattered command, and resulted ultimately in Bragg's defeat at Missionary Ridge, November 25th, his Rosecrans time to fortify and restore the morale of his shattered command, and resulted ultimately in Bragg's defeat at Missionary Ridge, November 25th, his retreat into Georgia, and his relinquishment of the command of the army to Joseph E. Johnston. His active military career may be said to have closed here, as he was assigned to staff-duty at Richmond, where he remained until shortly before the clos
with distinction under Lyon, Fremont, and Curtis. He was removed from Missouri, and appointed to command the Twelfth Army Corps under Pope, in Virginia, and has greatly distinguished himself. Although much sneered at by those in the Federal Army, and subjected on all occasions to many slights and annoyances, Sigel is a much better General than many who have been his superiors in command, and could do more with a division than half-a-dozen such men as General Pope. Sturges, Grant, Buell, Rosecrans, and others, who have displayed traits of genius under adverse circumstances, have never been called to chief command, simply because they were foreigners, or opposed to the dominant party in politics. Men of ability, without politicians to assist them, can never expect to rise; and if it were known to-morrow that a foreigner was in the ranks capable of guiding the destinies of the nation, he might remain there in obscurity, and the continent be reduced to anarchy, ere Northern pride wou
im as our point of defence; while Beauregard preferred Manassas and Bull Run-much inferior situations, although accidental victory crowned our efforts and immortalized the latter place. The defeat of Pegram in Western Virginia by McClellan and Rosecrans, at Rich Mountain, occurred before Manassas, as I have mentioned in another place. A few weeks after the Yankee rout at Manassas, Lee was sent to Western Virginia, with only a few raw recruits, under Wise and Floyd, to contend against the nwell fortifying different mountain passes and important hills. It was said, be cause he did not fight, that he was afraid, that he was one of the old school, etc. The truth is, he did not dare to fight, exception very advantageous terms, which Rosecrans was too much of an officer to grant. There was no excuse for the latter not offering or seeking battle, for his force — was large and superabundantly supplied. Lee, however completely foiled him on every occasion; and thus' the time passed, u
improving in fighting qualities. His precipitate retreat from Fayetteville last spring, when he was expected to co-operate with Colonel Phillips, was not by any means very creditable to him, and if what has been reported in regard to the matter be true, should have subjected him to censure by court martial. Perhaps he has determined to wipe out that little stain from his record A great battle was fought on the 19th and 20th instant, near Chattanooga, Tennessee, between the forces of General Rosecrans, about sixty thousand strong, and the combined rebel forces of Generals Bragg, Longstreet and Hill, estimated at upwards of a hundred thousand men. It is reported that the losses in killed and wounded on both sides, will foot up twenty-five thousand men. Our troops have suffered a temporary check in their forward movement. It is the intention, however, to renew the contest as soon as reinforcements come up. Our scouts brought in a report on Sunday, the 27th, that a band of guerri
n fought between the forces of General Grant and General Bragg, at Lookout Mountain, above the clouds, near Chattanooga, Tennessee, resulting in a grand victory for the Union arms. After the temporary check to the advance of our army under General Rosecrans, on the 19th and 20th of September, the rebel leaders determined to prevent General Grant from reinforcing it, and to use every means in their power to crush it. Jeff. Davis is reported to have stated recently, that Rosecrans' army in NortRosecrans' army in Northern Georgia, must be crushed, if it took all the resources of the Confederacy to do it. But the rebel leaders should begin to see by this time, that when General Grant takes command of any grand division of our army in any section, it is sure to win. His presence on the field inspires the troops with confidence of victory. This confidence enables men to brave dangers, endure hardships, and to perform heroic actions, which they could not endure or perform under depressed states of their nervou
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Lee's West Virginia campaign. (search)
ers. After the withdrawal of McClellan, General Rosecrans was assigned to the command of the Depar operations on the line of the Kanawha. General Rosecrans was one of the most energetic and skilfu seeing that it was the evident intention of Rosecrans to attack him, ordered Wise to his support, he determined to hold it, and give battle to Rosecrans if he persisted in advancing. So he orderedarely time to complete his arrangements when Rosecrans appeared on the opposite crest. Each army nng to the natural strength of his position. Rosecrans, discovering the formidable preparations of o would lose their lives in doing it. If General Rosecrans does not attack us, we will find a way t that it would be impossible to overtake General Rosecrans and bring him to a successful engagementeat loss. He, therefore, determined to give Rosecrans every opportunity to attack before taking the offensive himself, which, as we have seen, Rosecrans prevented by abandoning his own plans and re[10 more...]
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The siege of Morris Island. (search)
er could not be breached until after Wagner had been reduced; but Gillmore thought differently, and bent all his energies to make good the faith that was in him. The engineers commenced work on the night of the 25th of July, and by the 16th of August the batteries were completed. They were eight in number — the nearest one being thirty-four hundred yards from Sumter, and the farthest forty-two hundred and thirty-five yards. Seven of these batteries bore the distinctive names of Brown, Rosecrans, Meade, Hayes, Reno, Stevens, and Strong, mounting the following guns, viz.: one three-hundred-pounder, six two-hundred-pounders, nine one-hundred-pounders, two eighty-four-pounder Whitworth, two thirty and four twenty-pounders; all Parrotts except two guns, and the whole of them rifled. Never before had such a weight of metal been directed against any fortress in one attack since the art of war began. Those who have not engaged in such operations can have only a faint idea of the labor
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...