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The Daily Dispatch: October 28, 1863., [Electronic resource] 22 0 Browse Search
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the railroad crosses it, and the forces stationed there constitute, probably, the advance guard of that wing of the Federal army which is operating from Knoxville as a base. Our success will doubtless cut off the supplies which it is reported Rosecrans has been receiving from that quarter, and to that extent add to the perplexity of his situation at Chattanooga. Turning towards Bridgeport, it is reported that our pickets are four miles this side of Trenton, in Dade county, Gd., and that right flank, at the suggestion of Gen. Thomas, but was fooled by the stubborn resistance of Walker, Forrest, Cheatham, and Cleburne; whilst Stewart and Bood, of Longstreet's command, fought on the left, as they did on the succeeding day. On Sunday Rosecrans, the idea of turning our right having been abandoned, seemed to act under the belief that we were attempting to turn his left, opposed to our right, and he massed such a force on that part of his lines as to enable him to maintain his positi
The Daily Dispatch: October 28, 1863., [Electronic resource], Narrative of Wheeler's Circuit around Rosecrans. (search)
Narrative of Wheeler's Circuit around Rosecrans. The circuit of Gen. Wheeler around Rosecrans appears to have been one of the most dashing episodes of the Western war. The division of cavalry left Gen. Bragg's army, and by the morning of the sRosecrans appears to have been one of the most dashing episodes of the Western war. The division of cavalry left Gen. Bragg's army, and by the morning of the second day had gained the summit of the famous Walden's Ridge, from whence its work was to begin. A letter from a participant, published in the Atlanta Register, gives the first connected account of the exploit, and from it we take some interesting ve been captured, had it not been for their arms and horses. The train was loaded with ammunition and commissaries for Rosecrans's army. Grand, indeed, was the scene of this splendid train on fire, which was more than ten miles in length. Doubtless Rosecrans cursed most bitterly when this intelligence reached him, as his army was getting short of supplies. Several wagons loaded with navy pistols were unknowingly burned in the train. Hundreds of mules were shot in the harness, that cou
The Daily Dispatch: October 28, 1863., [Electronic resource], A Yankee view of the battle of Chickamauga. (search)
llious in killed and wounded is as great, and perhaps greater than our own, and we have some 1,500 prisoners. When Rosecrans commenced his movement on Chattanooga, Bragg lay there with about 25,000 men, which was amply sufficient to hold the place against any force which might attack in front, on from the north side of the Tennessee. New old Rosecrans's plan was to send Crittenden's corps down to attack Chattanooga in front, (that is, from the north side of the Tennessee river.) while he or else lie in his entrenchments at Chattanooga and starve to death, as Pemberton did at Vicksburg. Well, just as Rosecrans had succeeded in making the movement, Joe Johnston arrived with a few thousand men from Mobile and took command, ordered the evacuation of the town, and commenced making a big show of falling back on Rome or Atlanta. Rosecrans was completely fooled by this movement, and rushed with General Thomas's corps into Chattanooga (where he spent a couple of precious days in
The Daily Dispatch: October 28, 1863., [Electronic resource], Narrative of Wheeler's Circuit around Rosecrans. (search)
The retired list. Capt. Semmes is said to have suspended around his cabin the chronometers of the Yankee vessels he has captured, like the scalps with which an Indian warrior keeps the record of his triumphs. The Administration of the United States have an army of scalps about as numerous as Capt. Semmes's chronometers, but they are the scalps of their friends, not their enemies. From Scott to Rosecrans — perhaps Meade will soon be added to the list — there is hung up at Washington a ghostly army of the scalps of great Generals, each of whom, in his turn, was the most extraordinary warrior that the world had ever seen; but who successively became transformed into miserable shams and humbugs, and perished ignobly at the hands of their own friends. They now constitute the retired list of the U. S. Army, not by act of Congress, but by failure to redeem the exaggerated and ridiculous expectations of the most boastful and arrogant people on the face of the earth. We have no t