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Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz) 30 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz). You can also browse the collection for Frederick Rosencrantz or search for Frederick Rosencrantz in all documents.

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Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), I. First months (search)
s waylaid by a lieutenant, the officer of the day, who with much politeness said General Meade was out for a ride, but would I not walk into a tent and take some whiskey; which I accepted, all but the whiskey. He turned out to be a Swede, one Rosencrantz, and I rejoiced his soul by speaking of Stockholm. Presently there arrived the General himself, who cried out, Hulloo, Lyman! How are you? just as he used to. He was as kind as possible, and presently informed me I was to mess with him. As agraph is from a letter dated December 15. I lose my tent-mate, the phlegmatic countryman of Gustav Adolf and Charles XII. He could not get permission to remain on General Hunt's Staff and so will have the satisfaction of joining his cavalry regiment, which is hutted somewhere in the mud, near Culpeper! In his place I shall probably have Rosencrantz, another Swede, and for some time at Headquarters as A. D.C. He is a courteous man, an old campaigner, and very amusing with his broken English.
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 3 (search)
absence, passed Christmas at home, and returned to the army about the middle of January. He found Headquarters almost deserted, General Meade sick in Philadelphia with an attack of inflammation of the lungs, General Humphreys, and his tent-mate Rosencrantz, away on leave of absence, and Barstow sick and weak, with a cold on the lungs.] Headquarters, Army of Potomac January 23, 1864 Yesterday came General Humphreys, to my great content. His son, with Worth and myself, rode down to bid him ut General Humphreys would not stir, as he said he must stay to attend to the despatches and telegraph. However, at 3 P. M., he suddenly did start, with his own aides and Biddle, Mason, Cadwalader and myself, de la part de General Meade; also Rosencrantz. To Morton's Ford is some ten miles, but you might as well call it fifty, such is the state of the roads. Mud, varying from fetlocks to knees, then holes, runs, ditches and rocks — such was the road. With utmost diligence it took fully two
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), IV. Cold Harbor (search)
ton, canned fruit, etc., for the behoof of the suffering hossifers, and was received with sweet smiles. This morning we made up a quartette, the two Frenchies, Rosencrantz and myself, and made a journey to City Point, distant some twelve or thirteen miles. It was not unpleasant, though the sun was extremely hot; for we took back rreed to a cessation of hostilities for the burial of the dead and relief of the wounded. After struggling awhile with my indolence, I tumbled out of bed, waked Rosencrantz and ordered my horse. We speedily got ready and sallied forth to look at the field. We rode into a piece of pine woods, at the corner of which I was during there is always a risk) the making of a mediocre army commander! August 4, 1864 This was quite a festal day for us. The General, accompanied by the Frenchies, Rosencrantz, Bache, Biddle and myself, paid a grand visit to Butler. Butler was in high feather. He is as proud of all his fixin's as a farmer over a prime potato patch.
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 7 (search)
pot, and the sergeant to be arrested for not seizing the persons. Who do you think they were? Why, Captain Craig and Rosencrantz, taking an evening stroll! Craig has no circulation and turns up his collar whenever the mercury falls below 70 degreair. The pelican came up and bobbed at the Meade, as did his friend. We carted them all to see Fort Wadsworth, where Rosencrantz swears that Mr. Stanton, on being informed that there was only a picket line between him and the enemy, pulled out hisrted with its precious freight of military and diplomatic jewels, General Meade accompanied it, with Biddle, Mason and Rosencrantz. It would appear that they encountered, at City Point, Admiral Porter with Mrs. P. and another lady, who came, on theon, when he gets talking and in company he likes. At nine o'clock came the galliant Generale, with his aides, whereof Rosencrantz and Mason were bursting to tell something good; whereas Biddle had a foolish and deprecatory air. It immediately was r
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 8 (search)
the Colonel, it would appear, and afforded an innocent topic of conversation. Since then two other English officers have been entrusted to the fatherly care of Rosencrantz, and diligently shown round. When they got near the end, they said: Now we are much pleased to find you are a foreigner, because we can frankly ask you, what yat howling? said the testy General, at breakfast. Yes, what did the confounded fools mean? added the pacific Humphreys. But the most indignant personage was Rosencrantz. I do svear! he exclaimed, this whole night have I not a single vink slept. It is not enough that those sentry fellows should tell us vat time it is, but theNew Orleans, and, later, Admiral Dahlgren allowed him to go into Charleston, where he even went about in the city. Oh! I forgot to mention, in particular, that Rosencrantz is brevetted a Major, at which he is much pleased. There followed much merriment in the camp over shoulder-straps, those who had been promoted giving theirs to
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), Index (search)
Joseph, 34. Review of troops, 9, 316, 318; 2d corps, 75; 9th corps, 261. Rice, James Clay, 109, 180. Rice's station, 352. Richmond, fall of, 343. Ricketts, James Brewerton, 98, 139, 144, 174, 176, 177, 184, 208, 232, 299. Riddle, William, 293. Ring, —, 172. Robertson's Tavern, 53, 54, 58. Robinson, John Cleveland, 104. Rockwell, —, Rev., 74. Roebling, John Augustus, 240. Roebling, Washington Augustus, 56, 168, 253; described, 240. Rogers, William Barton, 315. Rosencrantz, Frederick, 63, 64, 177, 183, 193, 202, 204, 210, 232, 244, 249, 277, 304, 306, 309, 315, 336; first meeting, 6; on the English, 268; major, 290. Roumania, 307. Rowley, William Reuben, 84, 164. Rush's Lancers, 130. Russell, David Allen, 128, 144, 177. Russell, Elizabeth, III. Russell, George Robert, III. Russell, Henry Sturgis, 161, 164, 165, 269. Russians on horse, 61. Sailor's Run, 351. Salient, taking of the, 110; map, 113. Sanders, William Wilkins, 163, 177, 199.