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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
duty along the Yazoo delta, opposing with cavalry and artillery the advance of the Federal transports. During Grant's preliminary movements against Vicksburg he thwarted the attempt of Sherman and Porter to reach the city in the rear by way of Deer creek. In 1863 he was promoted to brigadier-general. He was active in command of cavalry in harassing Sherman's movement to Chattanooga, and during the Georgia campaign of 1864 his brigade of Alabamians and Mississippians, with Armstrong's and Ross' brigades, formed the cavalry of the army of Mississippi, under command of Gen. W. H. Jackson, operating on the left wing of Johnston's army. He defeated Wilder's lightning brigade, and displayed gallantry on every field. When Sherman began his march to Savannah, he harassed the Federal flank until within a few miles of Savannah, when he left his horses on the South Carolina side of the river, after swimming it, and entering Savannah with his men as infantry, covered the rear of Hardee's ar
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
was the manager of the Cowpens furnace. By his previous marriage Charles Amos had a large family, of which five sons were Confederate soldiers: Franklin, also a veteran of the Mexican war, who served as commissary agent with the Confederate army; Ross, of the Thirteenth Georgia regiment, who was killed at Seven Pines; Benjamin F., of the Fifth South Carolina, died in the service; Rufus, of a Georgia regiment, promoted to captain and killed at Seven Pines; and James, of Captain Cleary's company,1829. He is descended from a Pennsylvanian, of Scotch-Irish descent, who came to South Carolina after Braddock's defeat, and engaged in planting. The grandson of the latter, and father of Judge Simonton, was Charles S. Simonton, who married Elizabeth Ross, a native of Ireland, and became a successful merchant at Charleston. Judge Simonton was graduated at the South Carolina college in 1849, after which he read law and was admitted to practice at Charleston in 1852. In 1857 he formed a partne