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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 25: capture of Fort Hindman or Arkansas Post. (search)
Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, Wm. F. Hamilton; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, J. S. Harvey; Acting Master, J. C. Little; Acting-Ensign, Richard Ellis; Acting-Master's Mates, L. F. Knapp and Richard Mitchell: Acting-Chief Engineer, Chas. Christopher; Engineers, Jos. Goodwin, B. A. Farmer and G. S. Baker; Acting-Gunner, Robert Sherman; Acting-Carpenter, Jos. Morton. Steamer judge Torrence. Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, J. F. Richardson; Acting-Ensign, Jeremiah Irwin; Acting-Master's Mate, James Ross; Acting-Chief Engineer, P. R. Hartwig; Engineers, J. Stough, J. C. Barr and W. Y. Sedman. Steamer New Era. Acting-Master, F. W. Flammer; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, Wm. B. Purdy: Acting-Ensigns, Wm. C. Hanford and Geo. L. Smith; Acting-Master's Mates, G. E. Cheever, W. C. Renner, W. B. Shillits and Wm. Wharry; Acting-Engineers, Israel Marsh, John Darragh and Richard Fengler; Acting-Gunner, Louis Fredericks. Receiving ship New national. Acting-Masters, Alex. M. Grant and O. H. P
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 26: siege of Vicksburg. (search)
the, Lieutenant-Commander Foster, the Baron DeKalb, Lieutenant-Commander Walker, the tinclad Rattler, Lioness (ram) and two other light draft vessels. All were under the command of Lieutenant-Commander Watson Smith, who had instructions to open the way to the Yazoo River and destroy all of the enemy's means that could not be carried away. General Grant sent an Army contingent along with the gunboats to assist in forcing the way through the obstructions. This force was commanded by Brigadier-General Ross. To describe the difficulties which attended this expedition would be impossible and they could only be realized by those who saw them. The pass had been closed for many years and trees had grown up in the middle of the channel which Lad become dry after the levee was built across its mouth. Great rafts were left in this dry channel as the water ran off and bushes and vines now grew thickly around them and tied them together as with withes. Overhanging trees joined together ove
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 30: (search)
er great Western (powder Vessel.) *Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, Wm. F. Hamilton; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, Jos. S. Harvey; Acting-Master, J. C. Little; Acting-Ensign, Richard Ellis; Acting-Master's Mates, L. F. Knapp and R. Mitchell; Engineers, Chas. Christopher, Joseph Goodwin, B. A. Farmer and G. S. Baker; Acting-Gunner, Robert Sherman; Acting-Carpenter, Joseph Morton. Steamer * Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant J. F. Richardson; Acting-Ensign, Jeremiah Irwin; Acting-Master's Mate, James Ross; Engineers, P. R. Hartwig, J. Stough, John C. Barr and W. Y. Sedman. Mortar boats. Commanded by Gunner * Eugene Mack, afterwards by *Ensign Miller. Vessels employed at other points on the river (1863-5). Steamer Peosta (4th rate).--Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, T. E. Smith (1864). Steamer Kenwood (4th rate).--Acting-Master John Swaney (1864). Steamer Paw-Paw (4th rate).--Acting-Master A. F. Thompson (1864). Steamer Conestoga 4th rate).--Lieutenant-Commander * T. O. Self
ote which I beg leave to transcribe for the benefit of some of my younger readers if not most of the older ones:-- Mr. James Ross, of Pittsburg, was Washington's agent for the sale of his lands in Pennsylvania. He came to Philadelphia to settle h, he found all the ladies — the Custises, Lewises, Mrs. Washington, and others in the parlor, obviously in great alarm. Mr. Ross described them as gathered together in the middle of the room like a flock of partridges in a field when a hawk is in the neighborhood. Very soon the President entered and shook hands with Mr. Ross, but looked dark and lowering. They went in to breakfast, and after a little while the Secretary of War came in and said to Washington: Have you seen Randolph's pamphlet?st down upon the table with all his strength, and with a violence which made the cups and plates start from their places. Ross said he felt infinitely relieved; for he feared that something in his own conduct had occasioned the blackness of the Pres
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arctic exploration. (search)
attempt to penetrate the polar sea by Bering Strait. He went only as far as 70° 45′. In 1817 Captain Ross and Lieutenant Parry sailed for the polar sea from England; and the same year Captain Buchan commercial. Buchan and Franklin went by way of Spitzbergen; but they only penetrated to 80° 34′. Ross and Parry entered Lancaster Sound, explored its coasts, and Ross returned with the impression thaRoss returned with the impression that it was a bay. Parry did not agree with him in this opinion, and he sailed on a further exploration in 1819. He advanced farther in that direction than any mariner before him, and approached the magtted out. Captain Parry sailed for the polar waters in 1827. This expedition was a failure. Captain Ross was in the polar waters again from May, 1829, until the midsummer of 1833. The party had been given up as lost. Another party had started in search of Ross, explored the north coast of America, and discovered Victoria Land. Other land expeditions followed; and one, under Dr. John Rae, com<
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), State of Pennsylvania, (search)
William F. JohnsonActing1849 William Bigler1852 James Pollock1855 William F. Packer1858 Andrew G. Curtin1861 John W. Geary1867 John F. Hartranft1873 State governors—Continued. Henry M. Hoyt1879 Robert E. Pattison1883 James A. Beaver1887 Robert E. Pattison1891-1895 Daniel H. Hastings1895-1899 William A. Stone1899-1903 United States Senators. Name.No. of Congress.Term. William Maclay1st to 2d1789 to 1791 Robert Morris1st to 4th1789 to 1795 Albert Gallatin3d1793 to —— James Ross3d to 8th1794 to 1803 William Bingham4th to 7th1795 to 1799 John Peter G. Muhlenberg7th1801 to 1802 George Logan7th to 9th1801 to 1805 Samuel Maclay8th to 10th1803 to 1808 Andrew Gregg10th to 13th1807 to 1813 Michael Leib10th to 13th1809 to 1814 Abner Lacock13th to 16th1813 to 1819 Jonathan Roberts13th to 17th1814 to 1821 Walter Lowrie16th to 19th1819 to 1825 William Findley17th to 20th1821 to 1827 William Marks19th to 22d1825 to 1831 Isaac D. Barnard20th to 22d1827 to 1831 Geo<
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Presidential elections. (search)
esident, James Madison, Republican, 128; De Witt Clinton, of New York, Federalist, 89. For Vice-President, Elbridge Gerry, of Massachusetts, 131; Jared Ingersoll, of Pennsylvania, Federalist, 86. Vacancy, 1. Madison was chosen President and Gerry Vice-President. 1816. For President, James Monroe, of Virginia, Republican, 183; Rufus King, of New York, Federalist, 34. For Vice-President. Daniel D. Tompkins, of New York, Republican, 183; John Eager Howard, of Maryland, Federalist, 22; James Ross, of Pennsylvania, 5; John Marshall, of Virginia, 4; Robert G. Harper, of Maryland, 3. Vacancies, 4. Monroe was chosen President and Tompkins Vice-President. 1820. For President, James Monroe, of Virginia, Republican, 231; John Q. Adams, of Massachusetts, Republican, 1. For Vice-President, Daniel D. Tompkins, Republican, 218; Richard Stockton, of New Jersey, 8; Daniel Rodney, of Delaware, 4; Robert G. Harper, of Maryland, and Richard Rush, of Pennsylvania, 1 vote each. Vacancies, 3.
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States. (search)
ested by its undeviating adherence to the wise policy of Jefferson and Madison, emerged from the struggle crowned with laurels and acknowledged as the national bulwark. In 1816 the popular verdict awarded to its judicious administration of affairs a mark of public confidence more signal than any which had been bestowed since the second election of Jefferson. The electoral vote of 186 was as follows: PresidentVice-President. StatesJames Monroe.Rufus King.P. P. Tompkins.J. E. Howard.James Ross.John Marshall.R. G. Harper. Connecticut954 Delaware33 Georgia88 Indiana33 Kentucky1212 Louisiana33 Maryland88 Massachusetts2222 New Hampshire88 New Jersey88 New York2929 North Carolina1515 Ohio88 Pennsylvania2525 Rhode Island44 South Carolina1111 Tennessee88 Vermont88 Virginia2525 —————————————— Total1833418322543 The election of Monroe was nearly unanimous, and foreshadowed the coming unanimity, when the policy of Jefferson, continued by his s
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 1. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Narrative and legendary poems (search)
-lent genius!—vain, Quick fancy and creative brain, Unblest by prayerful sacrifice, Absurdly great, or weakly wise! Midst yearnings for a truer life, Without were fears, within was strife; And still his wayward act denied The perfect good for which he sighed. The love he sent forth void returned; The fame that crowned him scorched and burned, Burning, yet cold and drear and lone,— A fire-mount in a frozen zone! Like that the gray-haired sea-king passed, Dr. Hooker, who accompanied Sir James Ross in his expedition of 1841, thus describes the appearance of that unknown land of frost and fire which was seen in latitude 77° south,—a stupendous chain of mountains, the whole mass of which, from its highest point to the ocean, was covered with everlasting snow and ice:— ‘The water and the sky were both as blue, or rather more intensely blue, than I have ever seen them in the tropics, and all the coast was one mass of dazzlingly beautiful peaks of snow, which, when the sun approa
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 1. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Notes. (search)
ndian Language. Note 6, page 106. Mat wonck kunna-monee. We shall see thee or her no more.—See Roger Williams's Key. Note 7, page 106. The Great South West God. —See Roger Williams's Observations, etc. Note 8, page 109. The barbarities of Count de Tilly after the siege of Magdeburg made such an impression upon our forefathers that the phrase like old Tilly is still heard sometimes in New England of any piece of special ferocity. Note 9, page 134. Dr. Hooker, who accompanied Sir James Ross in his expedition of 1841, thus describes the appearance of that unknown land of frost and fire which was seen in latitude 77° south,—a stupendous chain of mountains, the whole mass of which, from its highest point to the ocean, was covered with everlasting snow and ice:— The water and the sky were both as blue, or rather more intensely blue, than I have ever seen them in the tropics, and all the coast was one mass of dazzlingly beautiful peaks of snow, which, when the sun approache
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