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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 7 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 4 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 34: (search)
C. L. Franklin; Acting-Master's Mate. Omar Smith; Midshipman, B. H. Porter; Acting-Assistant Engineer, F. A. Whitfield. Steamer Hunchback. Acting-Lieutenant, E. R. Colhoun; Acting-Master, Ric'd Pasquell; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, Henry Cushing; Acting-Assistant Engineers, Henry Armstrong and John Wall; Acting-Master's Mates, Wm. Weaver and Chas. Weaver. Steamer Henry Brinker. Acting-Master, John E. Giddings; Acting-Master's Mate, W. B. Miles: Acting-Engineers, J. W. Kelsey, Robt. Ross and W. H. Yates. Sloop Granite. Acting-Master, E. Boomer. Steamer Hetzel. Commander, H. K. Davenport; Lieutenant, C. L. Franklin; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, N. L. Campbell; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, G. W. Morton; Acting-Assistant Engineers, Joshua Eddowes, J. B. Dick, T. B. Cole, J. H. Paget and W. H. Tower; Acting-Master's Mates, John Rudrow and Benj. Walker. Steamer I. N. Seymour. Acting-Master, F. S. Wells; Acting-Assistant Engineers, N. Eggleston, Stephen Mealeus, Ph
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 35: operations of the North Atlantic Squadron, 1863. (search)
. Steamer General Putnam. Acting-Master, Wm. J. Hotchkiss; Acting-Ensign, Wm. Jennings; Acting-Master's Mates, H. C. Hawkins, A. P. Kirkham and C. A. Jones; Engineers: Acting-Second-Assistants, James Osburn and R. A. Copeland; Acting-Third-Assistants, John Henry and W. P. Higgins. Steamer Henry Brinker. Acting-Master, James H. Hardesty; Acting-Ensign, H. S. Livermore; Acting-Master's Mate, Wm. B. Miles; Engineers: Acting-Second-Assistant, J. W. Kelsey; Acting-Third-Assistants, Robert Ross and W. H. Tate. Steamer Young Rover. Acting-Masters, Ira B. Studley and T. W. Dodge; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, Robert Cowie; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, Geo. W. Stone; Acting-Ensigns, D. S. Thompson, J. A. Edgren and E. M. Ryder; Acting-Master's Mates, W. F. Gragg and Joshua Simmons; Engineers: Acting-Second-Assistant, James Patterson; Acting-Third-Assistant, Samuel McAvoy. Steamer Philadelphia. Acting-Master, Silas Reynolds; Engineers: Acting-Second-Assistant, C. A. Norris; A
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bladensburg, battle of. (search)
ight attack. To destroy this flotilla, more than 5,000 regulars, marines, and negroes were landed at Benedict, with three cannon; and the British commander, Gen. Robert Ross, boasted that he would wipe out Barney's fleet and dine in Washington the next Sunday. The boast being known, great exertions were made for the defence of teing no chance for escape, the commodore blew up his flotilla at Pig Point (Aug. 22. 1814), and with his men hastened to join Winder at his headquarters. When General Ross arrived, perceiving Barney's flotilla to be a smoking ruin, he passed on to upper Marlboro, where a road led directly to Washington, D. C., leaving Admiral Coc To oppose this formidable force, Winder had less than 3,000 effective men, most of them undisciplined; and he prudently retreated towards Washington, followed by Ross, who had been joined by Cockburn and his sailors ready for plunder. That The Bridge at Bladensburg in 1861. night (April 23) the British encamped within 10 mile
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ross, Robert 1814- (search)
Ross, Robert 1814- Military officer; born in Ross Trevor, Devonshire, England; served as an officer of foot in Holland and in Egypt; was in the campaign in Spain under Sir John Moore, and commanded a brigade in the battles of Vittoria and the Pyrenees. He commanded the troops sent against Washington in August, 1814, and was successful; but attempting to cooperate with the British fleet in an attack on Baltimore, in September, he was slain near North Point, Md., Sept. 12, 1814, while riding towards that city, chatting gayly with an aide-de-camp. See Baltimore.
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States. (search)
e him was skillfully avoided. This political Scylla and Charybdis had left a middle space wide enough to admit of safe passage, and Jefferson had learned from Ovid, in medio tutissimus ibis. War could be delayed for some hostile act of France, while the attachment of the Western people to the Republican party and their confidence in Jefferson were too firm to be easily shaken. The temper of the West was plainly shown in the debates upon the resolutions introduced into the Senate by Mr. Robert Ross, of Pennsylvania, February 16, 1803. These resolutions authorized the President to take immediate possession of New Orleans; to call into service the militia of South Carolina, Georgia, Ohio, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Mississippi Territory; to employ the military and naval forces of the United States; and use for these purposes the sum of $5,000,000, appropriated from the treasury. The administration opposed these resolutions, on the ground that there was no cause as yet to justify an