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dotte River. Several others are missing, and are supposed to be killed. Among the number is Capt. G. W. Bailey, of Portsmouth, who commanded a company in the railroad masked battery affair at Vienna, and also at Bull Run. Among those taken prisoners, are the Hon. K. V. Whaley, who was in command of the place; T. J. Heyslip, Clerk in the Quartermaster's Department; Capt. Paine, of Ohio, who was one of the first three to plant the Stars and Stripes on the walls of Monterey, in Mexico; and Capt. Ross, of Ironton, an intelligent Scotchman. Captain Thomas, of Higginsport, Ohio, is supposed to be taken; and also Dr. Morris, of Ironton, the first Surgeon. The rebels also arrested and took with them the following Union citizens, after having first taken and destroyed their goods: Wm. Dowthit, merchant, and his son; Dr. Rouse, druggist, who was also a Commissioner of the Federal Court; Albert White, and perhaps some others. At Barboursville they captured John W. Alford, candidate for th
was executed upon the absurd charge of witchcraft. See page 355. Holman, William (otherwise written Homan, Hoeman), came from Northampton, England, to Camb. in 1634, and res. on the corner now occupied by the Botanic Garden. By his w. Winifred he had, in England, Hannah, b. 1626; Jeremiah, b. 1628; Mary, b. 1630, d. unm. 1673; Sarah, b. 1632; Abraham, b. 1634; they perhaps had also in Camb. Isaac, who d. 12 Ap. 1663, and Seeth, b. 1640 (called dau. of Mr. Homan, by Mitchell), m. Thomas Ross 16 Jan. 1661-2, and was slain by the Indian enemy, at Billerica, 5 Aug. 1695, a. 55. William the f. d. 8 Jan. 1652-3, a. 59, his w. Winifred suffered much inconvenience from an accusation of witchcraft, 1659; but the charge against her was not sustained, and she d. in peace 16 Oct. 1671, a. 74. See pp. 356-364. 2. Jeremiah, s. of William (1), by w. Mary, had Mehetabel, b. 12 Nov. 1667; Jeremiah, b. 29 Aug. 1670. His w. d. and he m. Susanna. By one or both of his wives, he had also
was executed upon the absurd charge of witchcraft. See page 355. Holman, William (otherwise written Homan, Hoeman), came from Northampton, England, to Camb. in 1634, and res. on the corner now occupied by the Botanic Garden. By his w. Winifred he had, in England, Hannah, b. 1626; Jeremiah, b. 1628; Mary, b. 1630, d. unm. 1673; Sarah, b. 1632; Abraham, b. 1634; they perhaps had also in Camb. Isaac, who d. 12 Ap. 1663, and Seeth, b. 1640 (called dau. of Mr. Homan, by Mitchell), m. Thomas Ross 16 Jan. 1661-2, and was slain by the Indian enemy, at Billerica, 5 Aug. 1695, a. 55. William the f. d. 8 Jan. 1652-3, a. 59, his w. Winifred suffered much inconvenience from an accusation of witchcraft, 1659; but the charge against her was not sustained, and she d. in peace 16 Oct. 1671, a. 74. See pp. 356-364. 2. Jeremiah, s. of William (1), by w. Mary, had Mehetabel, b. 12 Nov. 1667; Jeremiah, b. 29 Aug. 1670. His w. d. and he m. Susanna. By one or both of his wives, he had also
Lydia Maria Child, Isaac T. Hopper: a true life, The United States Bond. (search)
t make her appearance, and I shall be obliged to forfeit your recognizance. A thousand dollars is a large sum to lose, rejoined Friend Hopper. But if it comes to the worst, I suppose we must make up our minds to pay the United States all the claim they have upon us. The United States! The United States! exclaimed the magistrate quickly. He turned to look at his docket, and after a slight pause he said to the claimant, There is difficulty here. You had better employ counsel. Thomas Ross, a respectable lawyer, who lived a few doors above, was summoned, and soon made his appearance. Having heard the particulars of the case briefly stated, he also examined the docket; then turning to Isaac T. Hopper, with a comical gesture and tone, he exclaimed, Eh! To the claim. ant he said, You must catch your slave again if you can; for you can do nothing with these securities. Of course, the master was very angry, and so was the magistrate, who had inadvertently written the recog
Cambridge, on the east side of Fresh Pond Meadow and Menotomy Brook, was divided into allotments by vote of the town, in 1658 (Paige, 96). A lawsuit about fishing in Menotomy River, established the right of Cambridge to take fish in that river, in 1681, which privilege has remained unimpaired to the present time (Paige, 97-8). Edward Randolph, the arch-enemy of the colony, attempted to obtain possession of seven hundred acres of land near Spy Pond, in 1688 (Paige, 103, &c.). In 1656 Thomas Ross, a Scotchman, and a servant to Edward Winship, had liberty to mow the grass in the swamp anent the north end of Spy Pond (Paige, 646). Andrew Beard was chosen hog-reeve for Menotomy, 1692 (Paige, 486). Jonathan Butterfield was field-driver for Menotomy fields, 1693 (Paige, 505). Jacob Chamberlin was chosen hog-reeve for Menotomy, in 1695 (Paige, 506). Offices once of greater significance than at present. A transfer from Holden to Prentice of a large part of the Holden Farm, bounded
Ricker, 289 Ripley, 118, 119 Robbins, 17, 18, 22, 24, 27, 28, 34, 36, 37, 39, 44, 83, 94, 96, 107, 112, 116, 138, 154, 166,169, 171, 175, 176, 192, 195, 199, 220-22, 237, 247, 253,257, 259, 260, 263, 276, 277,280, 284, 286, 289-93, 305, 318, 320, 322, 330, 349, 361 Robertson, 289, 292 Robinson, 68, 191, 193, 194, 221, 255, 276, 292 Roby, 70 Rock, 240, 292 Rockwell, 346 Rodgers, 161 Rogers, 25, 34, 213, 292 Rolfe or Rolph, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 316 Rose, 292 Ross, 9 Rouse, 292 Rowe, 346 Royall, 29, 90 Rugg, 166 Russell, 1, 2, 9, 12, 16, 17, 19, 20, 22, 23, 27-31, 37, 40, 46, 49, 68-70, 72-7, 83, 91-4, 96, 97, 107, 108, 110-17, 119-22, 128-33, 135-40, 143, 144, 146, 147, 151, 152, 154, 155, 157, 159, 165, 167-72, 176, 177, 184-86, 188-90, 192, 193, 202, 205, 206, 209-11, 214, 217, 218, 222-25, 230, 231, 233, 234, 236, 238,241, 245, 246, 249, 253, 255, 256, 259, 260, 262, 264-67, 269, 271-75, 277, 281, 283, 285, 289, 292-99, 300, 306, 308