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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 60 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 31 1 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 11 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 5 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 2 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for L. S. Ross or search for L. S. Ross in all documents.

Your search returned 16 results in 5 document sections:

ng there, Major Cook went out with a small cavalry force, and encountered a brigade of Texas cavalry, numbering one thousand five hundred, commanded by Brigadier-General L. S. Ross. A sharp fight ensued, in which Major Cook lost nineteen prisoners, and Colonel Jones, of the Texas cavalry,was killed. On the next morning, while oud by Major McKee, took possession of the earthwork, on a commanding point, a half-mile distant from the city. Thus matters stood till the fourth instant, when General Ross sent in a communication, asking what would be the treatment of prisoners if taken by negro soldiers. Colonel Coates replied that they would be treated with the respect due prisoners of war. On the night of the fourth, Ross was reenforced by a brigade of Tennessee troops, numbering eight hundred men, commanded by Brigadier-General R. V. Richardson; and at seven o'clock on the morning of the fifth, an attack was made upon Major McKee, who held the redoubt, while a portion of the enemy
(colored.) The enemy had eight regiments, under command of Ross and Richardson. The fight commenced at eight A. M., and lang party, but which proved to be the advance pickets of General Ross's Texas brigade. He dashed upon them, driving them bacs forced to get out of that rather lively. A detachment of Ross's brigade followed him up, and they had a running fight til A flag of truce was received by Colonel Coates from General Ross, on the fourth of March, asking if the fortunes of war wait. The enemy formed their lines, which consisted of General Ross's Texas brigade, and General Richardson's Tennessee brito one hundred and fifty yards. About twelve o'clock General Ross sent a flag of truce with the demand for a surrender. sk my men if I ever surrender. At the same time that General Ross took position around the fort, two regiments of General To Adjutant-General Cooper: General Lee telegraphs that Ross and Richardson attacked Yazoo City on the fifth instant, ca
ptain John Foster, accompanied the expedition, and on the morning of the fourth, Foster's advance-guard was met by Adams's rebel cavalry, at Champion Hills, who charged upon our small force, running over them, and taking seven prisoners. Their loss was one man killed and one wounded and left on the field. Captain Foster pushed forward and made a dash upon the enemy, and routed him with considerable loss. Their forces, consisting of about seven thousand men, commanded by Generals Wirt Adams, Ross, and Ferguson, and the whole under command of General S. D. Lee, then fell back to a commanding position on the west side of Baker's Creek, where our cavalry force encountered them in the afternoon, and were unable to dislodge them until an infantry force of the Seventeenth corps came up to join in the assault. The enemy had several pieces of artillery which he used upon us at this point with considerable effect. Our loss here was fifteen killed and a proportionate number wounded. The Tent
and cavalry behind a hill to the right of the battery, and running parallel to the river. On the second, we arrived at Sartalia, and at ten A. M. of the third we attacked the enemy at Liverpool, number about two thousand seven hundred men, under Ross, with two pieces of artillery. We silenced their guns, the army holding its position on the hills. At nightfall, the troops reembarked, and we dropped down for the night. The casualties were: the Petrel struck four times, without any serious daf her, however, there is plenty of water. The river is high and rising. I forgot to mention the land forces lost eight killed and twenty-two wounded in the attack of the third. We understand that there are about eight thousand men, under Stark, Ross, and Loring, at Yazoo City. Our spies and scouts have failed to return. To-morrow will probably develop the strength of the enemy. I am happy to say that Colonel Coates, commanding the land forces, and myself, get along together very well, nor
and did not aspire to any thing else. Being interrogated as to his knowledge of Richmond and its suburbs, he said he knew it like a bog; he was a guest at the Hotel de Libby in July, 1863, and knew the officers of the prison. Then recognizing Mr. Ross, the clerk, Hogan broke out, How do you do, Lieutenant Ross? Glad to see you. Hogan boasted of his narrow escape, having had four bullets put through his clothing and hair. In reply to a question as to what he was fighting for, he replied he Lieutenant Ross? Glad to see you. Hogan boasted of his narrow escape, having had four bullets put through his clothing and hair. In reply to a question as to what he was fighting for, he replied he was fighting for fun. When such fun ends in a hempen rope, as we trust it will, Hogan will cease to estimate his business a joke. Hogan disposed of for the present, we would inquire who is this John C. Babcock who sent Hogan on his own horse to Dahlgren? If found, he should certainly be sent headlong after Dahlgren, or brought to Richmond to participate in whatever fate awaits the outlaws of his command held here,--Richmond Examiner, March 8. Gen. Elzey's congratulations. headquarte