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anies, numbering 284 officers and men and thirteen guns--six 6-pounders, smooth bore, four 12-pound howitzers, and three rifled 6-pounders, all bronze — under my command, was assigned to duty as follows: Four 12-pound howitzers, under Lieutenant J. T. Rosser, commanding; Lieut. C. C. Lewis, Lieut. C. H. Slocumb, and Lieut. H. A. Battles, with Gen. Ewell's second brigade at Union Mill Ford. Two 6-pounders, smooth bore, under command of Capt. M. B. Miller, Lieut. Joseph Norcom, with Generalunder command of Captain Miller, with General Jones's brigades, and Lieutenant Garnett with General Longstreet's brigade, were not engaged at their respective points, although under fire a portion of the day. The howitzer battery under Lieutenant commanding Rosser, with General Ewell's brigade, was on the march from two P. M., in the direction of Fairfax Court House, and, returning by way of Union Mills Ford, arrived with the reserve at my position, unfortunately too late to take part in the eng
J. T. Rosser. --The numerous friends of Mr. Rosser will place his name before the Nominating Convention of the People of Henrico, as a Conservative Candidate for a seat in the State Convention. Mr. Rosser is an experienced and observing man — is an eloquent and able debater, and deeply versed in the history and developmMr. Rosser will place his name before the Nominating Convention of the People of Henrico, as a Conservative Candidate for a seat in the State Convention. Mr. Rosser is an experienced and observing man — is an eloquent and able debater, and deeply versed in the history and development of the various and the important questions which will necessarily come up for decision in the State Convention. He is a true Virginian, a high-toned and chivalrous gentleman; and while he is, and ever has been, firmly opposed to the invidious or open attacks of the Black Republican party, in every form, he is eminently conserMr. Rosser is an experienced and observing man — is an eloquent and able debater, and deeply versed in the history and development of the various and the important questions which will necessarily come up for decision in the State Convention. He is a true Virginian, a high-toned and chivalrous gentleman; and while he is, and ever has been, firmly opposed to the invidious or open attacks of the Black Republican party, in every form, he is eminently conservative, judicious, and anti-revolutionary in his views. ja 22--1t Many Vot
Sixty of the Penitentiary transports, hired to Mr. Bibb, lately at work on the Covington and Ohio Railroad, have been brought back within the last few days and lodged in the institution. Yesterday eighty of those hired to Rosser & Co. were expected to arrive in the city. These prisoners can be employed to great advantage in any works of defence proposed to be erected around and near this city.
The Daily Dispatch: may 29, 1861., [Electronic resource], How the New York Regiment Behaved in the Mexican war. (search)
The Company of Mounted Rangers heretofore being raised in this city. Col. J. T. Rosser, is said now to number near eighty men.--The Colonel has been in some of the Western counties recruiting, and has succeeded in obtaining a number of just the kind of men he wanted.
Dead. --Major J. T. Rosser, Chief of Indian Affairs of the Confederate States, died on the 20th instant at Oak Hill, the residence of his brother, Rev. Leonidas Rosser. The deceased was formerly Lieutenant-Governor and afterwards Governor of the Territory of Minnesota, and came South when the war commenced. He was elected Major of the Tenth Virginia cavalry, for which command he had raised a company, and was in many engagements with that regiment, in which he behaved himself with great gallantry. He was a brave man, and thoroughly and fearlessly devoted himself to the good of his country in whatever position he was called to fill.