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J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 8: eagerness of the soldiers to hear the Gospel. (search)
o know nothing among them save Jesus Christ and Him crucified. If the personal allusions may be pardoned, I do not believe that Dr. Burrows, Dr. Stiles, Dr. Hoge, Dr. Dabney, Dr. Pryor, Dr. Lacy, Dr. Moore, Dr. Read, Dr. Duncan, Dr. Granberry, Dr. Rosser, Dr. Doggett, Dr. Edwards, Dr. John A. Broadus, Dr. Pritchard, Dr. Wingate, Dr. Andrew Broaddus, Dr. Jeter, Dr. A. B. Brown, or any of the missionaries or chaplains were ever able, before or since, to preach sermons of such power as they were smpressed upon me as if they had been yesterday. Dr. John A. Broadus, Dr. Andrew Broaddus, Rev. Andrew Broaddus (of Kentucky), Dr. Burrows, Dr. Thos. H. Pritchard, Dr. Jeter, Dr. Dickinson, Rev. F. M. Barker, Rev. L. J. Haley, Dr. J. A. Duncan, Dr. Rosser, Dr. Doggett, Dr. J. E. Edwards, Dr. Hoge, Dr. Stiles, Dr. Bocock, Dr. Pryor, Dr. Bennett, and others, came to preach in the camps, and the chaplains had no sort of difficulty in giving them constant work and very large congregations. I vividl
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 11: the great revival along the Rapidan. (search)
I returned to my command some two weeks since, and to my surprise and delight I found at least three-fourths of my company not only members of the Church of the living God, but professors of religion. This state of affairs is not limited to my company, but it extends throughout the entire regiment, and I might say the whole brigade (Law's Brigade). God grant that this good work may continue to flourish throughout the entire army. Of the work which came under his eye in Ewell's Corps Rev. Dr. Rosser wrote: My plan is, to visit and preach to this corps, division by division, and brigade by brigade—stopping longest where I can do most good, noticing vacancies in the chaplaincy, circulating religious reading as it reaches me, and sympathizing with the sick and wounded soldiers. A nobler work cannot engage the heart of the preacher, or the attention of the Church and nation. I can but glance at the work at this time. The whole army is a vast field, ready and ripe to the harvest
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Roster of chaplains, army of Northern Virginia. (search)
v. Mr. Phillippi. Artillery first Corps (Brigadier-General Alexander). Haskell's Battalion. J. A. Chambliss. Gibbes' Virginia Battalion. Cabell's Virginia Battalion. Huger's Virginia Battalion. Washington Artillery Battalion. Wm. A. Hall. Missionary Chaplains in the Corps: Rev. Dr. Theodorick Pryor; Rev. Dr. J. C. Granberry; Rev. Harvie Hatcher; Rev. A. B. Woodfin. Second Corps (Major-General John B. Gordon commanding). Chaplains-at-large: Rev. Dr. B. T. Lacy; Rev. Dr. L. Rosser; Rev. E. J. Willis. Gordon's Division. Evans' Brigade. Sixty-first Georgia. A. B. Woodfin. Thirty-first Georgia. J. L. Pettigrew. Thirty-eighth Georgia. J. M. Brittain. Twenty-sixth Georgia. Thirteenth Georgia. Sixtieth Georgia. S. H. Smith. Twelfth Georgia Battalion. Louisiana Brigade (Colonel Peck). Sixth Louisiana. Seventh Louisiana. Father Hubert. Fifth Louisiana. Wm. M. Strickler. Eighth Louisiana. Father Schmilders. Ninth Louisiana. Rev. F. McCarthy. First L
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Appendix no. 2: the work of grace in other armies of the Confederacy. (search)
ed Rev. J. N. Andrews, of the North Carolina Conference, a missionary to the soldiers in North Carolina, and the Rev. Leonidas Rosser, D. D., of the Virginia Conference, to take the place of Rev. Dr. James E. Evans, whose health had failed, in Generida; J. G. Richards, Tenth South Carolina; W. T. Hall, J. H. Myers, Forty-second Georgia; ——Thompson, Fortieth Georgia; Dr. Rosser, Forty-first Georgia; W. A. Parks, Fifty-second Georgia; L. B. Payne, Missionary, Cummings' Georgia Brigade; H. H. Kavamal service. Chaplain Thompson, Baptist, led fifteen soldiers into the water and baptized them, and was followed by Chaplain Rosser, Methodist Protestant, with four others who were baptized in the same way—only one service on the water's edge for the two chaplains. Five others were baptized on the land by Chaplain Rosser. The same day I saw Chaplain W. A. Parkes, Methodist South, administer the sacrament of the Lord's Supper to Stewart's Division, and among them, between two soldier communi<
s in progress in some of them, perhaps all. The chaplains of this corps have not met for several weeks. To-morrow is the regular time, but as the enemy shell the town every few days it is doubtful whether we will have a quorum. The spreading revival called for all the workers that could be supplied from the home work. Bishop Early, of the M. E. Church, South, appointed Rev. J. N. Andrews, of the North Carolina Conference, a missionary to the soldiers in North Carolina, and the Rev. Leonidas Rosser, D. D., of the Virginia Conference, to take the place of Rev. Dr. James E. Evans, whose health had failed, in General Ewell's corps in the Army of Northern Virginia. In midsummer of this year (1863) the people of the South were again called by the President of the Confederacy to observe a day of fasting and prayer. He issued the following proclamation: Again do I call upon the people of the Confederacy — a people who believe that the Lord reigneth, and that his overruling Pr
sed but little, being very weak, and much of the time suffering severe pain; yet he retained full possession of his faculties to the last, and the same calm, peaceful state of mind. Much of the time he was engaged in prayer, and often seemed anxious that his departure should be hastened. In the army of General Lee, while it lay on the upper Rappahannock, the revival flame swept through every corps, division, brigade, and regiment. Of the work which came under his eye in Ewell's corps Dr. Rosser wrote: My plan is, to visit and preach to this corps, division by division, and brigade by brigade-stopping longest where I can do most good, noticing vacancies in the chaplaincy, circulating religious reading as it reaches me, and sympathizing with the sick and wounded soldiers. A nobler work cannot engage the heart of the preacher, or the attention of the Church and nation. I can but glance at the work at this time. The whole army is a vast field, ready and ripe to the harvest
ng to get to heaven. When Christ's jewels gathered from earth shall be displayed to an admiring universe, I doubt not many thousands of precious souls converted in the late Confederate army will shine as stars forever and ever in the firmament of glory. The earnest purpose of the home Churches to promote the army revival was manifested by the number of ministers sent among the soldiers. We give a list of those who were sent by the Mission Board of the M. E. Church, South: Revs. Leo. Rosser and J. C. Granbery in the Army of Northern Virginia; J. B. McFerrin, C. W. Miller, W. Mooney, R. P. Ransom, and W. Burr in the Army of Tennessee; J. S. Lane and E. B. Duncan in the Department of Florida; J. J. Wheat and H. J. Harris in Mississippi; W. C. Johnson to General S. D. Lee's corps, North Mississippi; J. J. Hutchinson to army about Mobile; and beyond the Mississippi river, J. C. Keener to Louisiana troops, and B. T. Kavanaugh and E. M. Marvin to Missouri and Arkansas troops. Besi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), War Diary of Capt. Robert Emory Park, Twelfth Alabama Regiment. January 28th, 1863January 27th, 1864. (search)
on by a court martial and sentenced to be shot to death by musketry. It was a sad sight, but his death was necessary as a warning and lesson to his comrades. Each regiment was marched in front of the dead body, and his breast was pierced by several balls. On return to camp we found two of my men, George Ward and Dick Noble, had been on a scout across the river, and captured a Yankee, and carried him to General Rodes, and secured a splendid pistol and seven shooting rifles. Heard Rev. Dr. Leonidas Rosser, corps chaplain, deliver an eloquent lecture to our Christian Association on Patriotism, Benevolence and Religion. (note.—Several pages of the Diary, from 15th September to October 8th, were lost and of course omitted here.) October 8, 1863. I drew from Quartermaster J. M. Pickens, 15 envelopes, one quire of letter paper, half quire of note and half quire of foolscap paper, and five pens. Such things are growing scarce. Lieutenants F. A. Rogers and Jno. R. Williams, of Co.
11 o'clock A. M., and 3½ P. M. Third African, (Baptist.)--Rev. W. T. Lindsay, Pastor. 11 o'clock A. M., and 3½ P. M. Broad Street Methodist.--Rev. J. A. Duncan, Pastor. 11 o'clock A. M., and 7½ P. M. Trinity, (Methodist.)--Rev. Alex. G. Brown. 11 o'clock A. M., and 7½ P. M. Centenary, (Methodist.)--Rev. W. W. Bennett. 11 o'clock A. M., and 3½ P. M. Clay Street, (Methodist.)--Rev. W. G. Brown. 11 o'clock A. M., and 7½ P. M. Union Station, (Methodist.)--Rev. Leonidas Rosser. 11 o'clock A. M., and 7½ P. M. Oregon Chapel, (Methodist.)--Rev. Jas. E. Gates. 11 o'clock A. M. and 7½ P. M. Sidney, (Methodist.)--Rev. J. L. Lindsay. 11 o'clock A. M., and 7 P. M. Rocketts, (Methodist.)--Rev. Mr. Jones. 11 o'clock A. M., and 3½ P. M. African Methodist.--Rev. Geo. W. Nolley. 11 o'clock A. M., and 3½ P. M. First Presbyterian.--Rev. T. V. Moore, D. D. 11 o'clock A. M., and 7½ P. M. Second Presbyterian.--Rev. Moses D. Hoge, D. 11 o'clo
ipient of a Bible from his congregation at the close of his pastorship, and his labors have been blessed. Passed. John Bailey, now in Europe. A letter from him was read, stating that he felt it necessary to remain in Europe until May next. As a Southern preacher, he had met with but little sympathy, except among his own relatives.--He had, however, taken occasion to disabuse the minds of many persons in relation to slavery, and had not been without good results following his preaching. Leave was granted Mr. Bailey to remain in Europe until the 1st of May. Leonidas Rosser said he had much less time to preach than he desired. He had, however, expressed the great desire within him to prosecute at all times the work of the ministry.--Passed. E. P. Wilson, suffering under disease of the throat, and had been advised to remove to Florida. Passed. And after a short recess, to allow a meeting of the Conference Missionary Society, the Conference, at 1 o'clock, adjourned.
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