Browsing named entities in The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure). You can also browse the collection for T. L. Rosser or search for T. L. Rosser in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The First cavalry. (search)
Sheridan against General Early in the Shenandoah Valley, and took part in every battle during the campaign. In the battles of Opequan, Fisher's Hill, Brown's gap, and Wier's cave, the valiant conduct of this company attracted the attention of all who beheld it. And at the battle of Nineveh, when Capeheart's Brigade attacked and defeated McCausland's Division, this company led in the charge. When Sheridan set out from Winchester to join Grant, his way was obstructed by the rebels, under Rosser, at the bridge over North river, near Mount Crawford. The First New York Cavalry, under Lieutenant Colonel Battersby, was ordered to swim the river a mile above the bridge, and charge the rebels in flank; which they did in fine style-driving them out of their works, pursuing them about ten miles, capturing prisoners, guns, and wagons, and saving the bridge over Middle river. For this General Custer, to whose division they belonged, complimented them in person. Next day Custer advanced upo
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The famous fight at Cedar creek. (search)
before Richmond, and our army began falling back toward the Potomac, preparatory to such a transfer. During our return march the rear of our several columns was persistently harassed by a large force of surprisingly active cavalry, under General T. L. Rosser, who provokingly refused to consider himself or his command as hors de combat. Among many memories of hard service, those who were among Custer's troopers in the Valley will not soon forget their arduous task of protecting the rear of a viOctober 8th, near Fisher's Hill, Sheridan notified General Torbert, Chief of Cavalry, that he would halt the army there for twenty-four hours, and that on the following day he (Torbert) must face about, and whip the enemy or get whipped himself. Rosser's saucy cavalry numbered about three thousand effectives, and was supported by some fifteen hundred infantry and two batteries, under Generals Lomax and Bradley Johnston. With Merritt's First Division deployed to the right of the Valley pike, an