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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.42 (search)
Arty.), Lieut. James Woolfolk. Loss: k, 1; w, 4 == 5. Third Battalion, Maj. William Nelson: Va. Battery (Fluvanna Arty.), Capt. Charles T. Huckstep; Va. Battery (Amherst Arty.), Capt. Thomas J. Kirkpatrick; Va. Battery (Morris Arty.), Capt. R. C. M. Page. Loss: k, 1; w, 1 ==2. cavalry, Brig.-Gen. James E. B. Stuart: 1st N. C., Lieut.-Col. James B. Gordon, Col. Lawrence S. Baker; 1st Va., Col. Fitzhugh Lee; 3d Va., Col. Thomas F. Goode; 4th Va., Capt. F. W. Chamberlayne; 5th Va., Col. Thomas L. Rosser; 9th Va., Col. W. H. F. Lee, 10th Va., Col. J. Lucius Davis; Ga. Legion, Col. Thomas R. R. Cobb; 15th Va. Battalion, Maj. J. Critcher; Hampton (S. C.) Legion (squadron), Capt. Thomas E. Screven; Jeff Davis (Miss.) Legion, Lieut.-Col. W. T. Martin; Stuart Horse Artillery, Capt. John Pelham. Cavalry loss (incomplete): k, 5; w, 26; m, 40==71. Total Confederate loss (approximate): 3286 killed, 15,909 wounded, and 940 captured or missing == 20,135. The strength of the Confederates
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 8.58 (search)
right flank, and advanced directly toward Manassas, while the column kept directly down the pike to join General Jackson's right. I selected a fine position for a battery on the right, and one having been sent to me, I fired a few shots at the enemy's supposed position, which induced him to shift his position. General Robertson, who, with his command, was sent to reconnoiter farther down the road toward Manassas, reported the enemy in his front. Upon repairing to that front, I found that Rosser's regiment was engaged with the enemy to the left of the road, and Robertson's vedettes had found the enemy approaching from the direction of Bristoe Station toward Sudley. The prolongation of his line of march would have passed through my position, which was a very fine one for artillery as well as observation, and struck Longstreet in flank. I waited his approach long enough to ascertain that there was at least an army corps, at the same Collecting the wounded. In his Recollections
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at the Second Bull Run. August 16th-September 2d, 1862. (search)
oss: k, 6; w, 20; m, 1= 27. cavalry division, Maj.-Gen. James E. B. Stuart. Robertson's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Beverly H. Robertson: 2d Va., Col. Thomas T. Munford (w); 6th Va., Col. Thomas S. Flournoy; 7th Va., Col. William E. Jones, Capt. Samuel B. Myers; 12th Va., Col. A. W. Harman; 17th Va. Battalion, Maj. W. Patrick (m w). Brigade loss: k, 18; w, 78; m, 18=114. Lee's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Fitzhugh Lee: 1st Va., Col. L. T. Brien; 3d Va.,-----; 4th Va., Col. W. C. Wickham; 5th Va., Col. Thomas L. Rosser; 9th Va., Col. W. H. F. Lee. Brigade loss (not reported). Artillery: Va. Battery (Stuart Horse Art'y), Capt. John Pelham. Loss: k, 1; w, 5 =6. The losses sustained by Longstreet's corps are reported ( Official Records, Vol. XII., Pt. II., p. 568) as 663 killed, 4016 wounded, and 46 missing, in all 4725. Jackson reported his losses at 805 killed, 3547 wounded, and 35 missing, or a total of 4387 ( Official Records, Vol. XII., Pt. II., p. 648), but the reports of his subordinate
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Jackson's raid around Pope. (search)
time not even menaced; and if he had been, the gateways of retreat were wide open. His march had been made with such celerity, his flanks guarded with such consummate skill, that he Map: relative positions of forces at sunset. August 28, 1862. was in no hurry to execute those tactical movements which he recognized as essential to his safety and to the delivery of his heaviest blows. On one flank, Fitz Lee was as near to Alexandria as to Manassas Junction; and, on the other, Munford and Rosser were in advance of Bristoe. Jackson was resting — as a man full of life and vigor, ready to start into action at the first touch — but he rested in the consciousness of security. The Federal commander, around whose flank and rear fourteen brigades of infantry, two of cavalry, and eighteen light batteries had passed, was also resting-but in profound ignorance. On the 26th he ordered Heintzelman The Stone Bridge, Bull Run, from the North bank. From a sketch made in 1884. to send a r
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of South Mountain, or Boonsboro‘ (search)
was the same at 10 o'clock at night as it was at 9 o'clock in the morning. After posting Colquitt's brigade I went with Major Ratchford of my staff on a reconnoissance to our right. About three-fourths of a mile from the Mountain House we discovered by the voices of command and the rumbling of wheels, that the old road and heights above it were occupied, and took it for granted that the occupation was by Federal troops. We did not see them, and I suppose we were not seen by them. Colonel T. L. Rosser of the cavalry had been sent that morning with his regiment and Pelham's artillery, by order of General Stuart, to seize Fox's Gap on the Braddock road. Cox had got to the heights first and confronted Rosser with a portion of his command, while the remainder of it could be plainly seen at the foot of the mountain. General Rosser writes to me that he reported the situation of things to Stuart, who was passing by on the east side of the mountain on his way south. He, Rosser, was not
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Forcing Fox's Gap and Turner's Gap. (search)
y hung on a little longer at right and left, and for some time it was a fierce melee, hand to hand, but the Ohio boys were the victors. We found that there was a country road behind the wall on top of the ridge, and the cover of the forest had enabled the enemy's guns to get away toward our right. The 11th Ohio was sent from Crook's brigade beyond Scammon's left, where part of the enemy's force held a hill and summit higher than the ridge at the stone-wall. This seems to have been held by Rosser's cavalry with a battery. The 36th Ohio was, in similar manner, sent beyond Scammon's right. The whole line again sprung forward. The high knoll on the left was carried, the enemy's center was completely broken and driven down the mountain, while on the right our men pushed the routed Carolinians beyond the Sharpsburg road, through Wise's fields, and up the slope of the crest toward the Mountain House at Turner's Gap. The regiment on the enemy's extreme right had been cut off from the ot
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces in the Maryland campaign. (search)
, Jr.; Va. Battery, Capt. W. H. Rice. cavalry, Maj.-Gen. James E. B. Stuart. Hampton's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Wade Hampton: 1st N. C., Col. L. S. Baker; 2d S. C., Col. M. C. Butler: 10th Va.,----; Cobb's (Ga.) Legion, Lieut.-Col. P. M. B. Young (w), Maj. William G. Delony; Jeff. Davis (Miss.) Legion, Lieut.-Col. W. T. Martin. Lee's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Fitzhugh Lee: 1st Va., Lieut.-Col. L. T. Brien; 3d Va., Lieut.-Col. John T. Thornton (mo w); 4th Va., Col. W. C. Wickham; 5th Va., Col. Thomas L. Rosser; 9th Va.,----. Robertson's Brigade, Col. Thomas T. Munford: 2d Va., Lieut.-Col. Richard H. Burks; 7th Va., Capt. S. B. Myers; 12th Va., Col. A. W. Harman. Horse Artillery: Va. Battery, Capt. R. P. Chew; S. C. Battery, Capt. J. F. Hart; Va. Battery, Capt. John Pelham. Cavalry and Horse Artillery loss (in the campaign): k, 10; w, 45; mu, 6 = 61. According to the report of Lee's medical director (Dr. Guild), there was a loss of 1567 killed and 8724 wounded in the battles of South Mo