Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Thomas L. Rosser or search for Thomas L. Rosser in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 3 (search)
obb's Georgia Legion, Colonel G J. Wright, Phillips' Legion, Lieutenant-Colonel W. W. Rich. Jeff. Davis Legion, Lieutenant-Colonel J. F. Waring. Miller's Legion,—— —— Love's Legion,—— ——. Seventh Georgia, Major [E. C.] Anderson. Rosser's brigade. Brigadier-General Thomas L. Rosser. Seventh Virginia, Colonel R. H. Dulany. Eleventh Virginia, Colonel O. R. Funsten. Twelfth Virginia, Colonel A. W. Harman. Thirty-fifth Virginia Battalion, Lieut.-Colonel E. V. White. Lee's Brigadier-General Thomas L. Rosser. Seventh Virginia, Colonel R. H. Dulany. Eleventh Virginia, Colonel O. R. Funsten. Twelfth Virginia, Colonel A. W. Harman. Thirty-fifth Virginia Battalion, Lieut.-Colonel E. V. White. Lee's division. Major-General W. H. F. Lee. Barringer's brigade. Brigadier-General Rufus Barringer. First North Carolina, Colonel W. H. Cheek. Second N. C., Col. C. M. Andrews( On the original of this; was killed June 23, 1864.) [Col. W. P. Roberts]. Fourth North Carolina, Colonel D. D. Ferebee. Fifth North Carolina, Lieutenant-Colonel S. B. Evans. Chambliss's brigade. Brigadier-General J. R. Chambliss, Jr. Ninth Virginia, Colonel R. L. T. Beale. Tenth Virginia, Co
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of cavalry operations. (search)
on and I of the brigade. General Fitz Lee having been seriously wounded at the battle of Winchester, 19th September, I had command of Wickham's brigade from that time, except at the battle of Cedar Creek, when I was absent on sick leave. At General Rosser's Tom's Brook cavalry disaster, where we lost nearly everything on wheels, my trunk and desk containing all the data I had collected fell into the hands of the enemy. Wickham did not call for a report while with us in the Valley and I did blankets and canteens, oil-cloths and tent-flies—in short, all that we wanted, and our transportation were all branded U. S., together with the mules and harness. Our cavalry battery, caissons, battery forges, &c., all had the U. S. brand until Rosser's great disaster at Tom's Brook 9th October, 1864. Reconnoisance in force 19th August, 1864. Wickham's brigade of Fitz. Lee's division, Anderson's corps, was stationed to the right of Winchester, near Abram's creek. Its pickets extended al
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of Major-General Fitzhugh Lee of the operations of the cavalry corps A. N. V. (search)
ried, however, with loss in W. H. F. Lee's and Rosser's divisions. Munford, attacking about the samance. Amongst the wounded were numbered Major-Gen. Rosser, slightly, Captain Dawson, my very efficickett's left flank, swept it away, and before Rosser could cross Hatcher's Run, the position at thewounded and captured. The attack was made with Rosser's division mounted, supported by a portion oftion of the enemy's troops, proved fatal. General Rosser, in command of his own, and my old divisiofor the lives of Brigadier-General Dearing, of Rosser's division; Colonel Boston, Fifth Virginia cavames W. Thomson, Stuart's horse artillery, and Rosser's chief in that arm, were lost in attaining itch. They were met by Munford in front, whilst Rosser attacked their flank, and were driven back wity, W. H. F. Lee retiring towards our rear, and Rosser and Munford out towards Lynchburg, having clead excellent behavior of Generals W. H. F. Lee, Rosser and Munford, commanding divisions. The former[5 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 95 (search)
ethead's battery of horse artillery. We fell back up the Luray Valley, skirmishing all the way. Some several weak charges were attempted by the enemy, but without any real advantages to them or loss to us. Wickham moved back to Gorny Run and formed his line, and there remained for the day and night. There were the cavalry in poor condition which Sheridan had so guilelessly said he could not get at. This trouble seemed to have followed him until our great disaster at Tom's Brook, where by Rosser's rashness we were entrapped, and lost more in that one fight than we had ever done before, in all of our fights together. (I refer to material, not men.) On page 176, Pond's book, we find the following: The night of the 21st he sent this dispatch (Sheridan to Grant). Gen. Wilson's cavalry division charged the enemy at Front Royal pike this morning and drove them from Front Royal up the Luray Valley for a distance of six miles. I directed two brigades of the First Cavalry Division, wi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Retreat up the Luray Valley. (search)
ethead's battery of horse artillery. We fell back up the Luray Valley, skirmishing all the way. Some several weak charges were attempted by the enemy, but without any real advantages to them or loss to us. Wickham moved back to Gorny Run and formed his line, and there remained for the day and night. There were the cavalry in poor condition which Sheridan had so guilelessly said he could not get at. This trouble seemed to have followed him until our great disaster at Tom's Brook, where by Rosser's rashness we were entrapped, and lost more in that one fight than we had ever done before, in all of our fights together. (I refer to material, not men.) On page 176, Pond's book, we find the following: The night of the 21st he sent this dispatch (Sheridan to Grant). Gen. Wilson's cavalry division charged the enemy at Front Royal pike this morning and drove them from Front Royal up the Luray Valley for a distance of six miles. I directed two brigades of the First Cavalry Division, wi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The gallant Pelham and his gun at Fredericksburg. (search)
J. E. B. Stuart, and the other, as I learned afterwards, being Colonel Rosser, who, after saluting our Captain, said to him: We are instructeadefulls of earth thrown into the ditch made a passage-way. Colonel Rosser than told me to go up into the field and see what I had to do. s in position, commanding the field we were about to enter. Colonel Rosser told me to take any distance I chose to fight them, and in answam Green shoot, you know he did his best. General Stuart and Colonel Rosser remained with us awhile (I think the latter's horse was wounded a very destructive fire on their flank, under the direction of Colonel Rosser, Major Pelham commanding the others * * * * * * * * Galloping t the field. The General was very much displeased at first, but Colonel Rosser made matters all right, by telling him that it was useless to says that when his gun was detached to follow General Stuart and Colonel Rosser, We were advanced by half battery to the front, firing at our