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Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 10, 1864., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 8, 1865., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 2 0 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 16, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 24, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Camilla Urso (search)
se of giving the most thorough musical education to the daughter of whose genius he was so proud. He proposed that she should be received into the Conservatoire. The professors met the proposition with incredulity and amazement. Absurd, indeed! they said; she is too young, and a woman cannot be a pupil of the Conservatoire. But Signor Urso persisted. Only hear her, he said, before deciding. So the little sprite appeared before the most exacting, the most critical of juries. Auber, Rossini, Meyerbeer, and Massart were among the judges. They retired for a decision, and at the door the little applicant and the trembling father waited. At last the answer came. The new pupil was accepted unanimously. The father's hat went into the air with triumph. For three years Camilla studied almost incessantly. No advantages were waiting to the young aspirant for musical honors. Simon was her first teacher, but her chief instructor was Massart, who took an extraordinary interest i
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing), chapter 3 (search)
Nothing can be better arranged as a drama; the parts are in excellent gradation, the choruses are grand and effective, the composition, as a whole, brilliantly imposing. Yet it was dictated by taste and science only. Where are the enrapturing visions from the celestial world which shone down upon Haydn and Mozart; where the revelations from the depths of man's nature, which impart such passion to the symphonies of Beethoven; where, even, the fascinating fairy land, gay with delight, of Rossini? O, Genius! none but thee shall make our hearts and heads throb, our cheeks crimson, our eyes overflow, or fill our whole being with the serene joy of faith. * * I went to see Vandenhoff twice, in Brutus and Virginius. Another fine specimen of the conscious school; no inspiration, yet much taste. Spite of the threadpaper Tituses, the chambermaid Virginias, the washerwoman Tullias, and the people, made up of half a dozen chimney-sweeps, in carters' frocks and red nightcaps, this man
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899, Chapter 1: birth, parentage, childhood (search)
ceeded by a reaction of intense melancholy. The musical stars of those days are probably quite out of memory in these later times, but I remember some of them with pleasure. It is worth noticing that, while the earliest efforts in music in Boston produced the Handel and Haydn Society, and led to the occasional performance of a symphony of Beethoven or of Mozart, the taste of New York inclined more to operatic music. The brief visit of Garcia and his troupe had brought the best works of Rossini before the public. These performances were followed, at long intervals, by seasons of English opera, in which Mrs. Austin was the favorite prima donna. This lady sang also in oratorio, and I recall her rendering of the soprano solos in Handel's Messiah as somewhat mannered, but on the whole quite impressive. A higher grade of talent came to us in the person of Mrs. Wood, famous before her marriage as Miss Paton. I heard great things of her performance in La Sonnambula, which I was no
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899, Chapter 7: marriage: tour in Europe (search)
feel a sort of intoxication when I recall his rendering of Coma é gentil. Grisi sang several times. She was then in what some one has termed, the insolence of her youth and beauty. Mlle. Persiani, also of the grand opera, gave an air by Gluck, which I myself had studied, Pago fui, Fui lieto un di Lord Lansdowne told me that this lady was the most obliging of artists. I afterwards heard her in Linda di Chamounix, which was then in its first favor. The concert ended with the prayer from Rossini's Mose in Egitto, sung by the artists already named with the addition of the great Lablache. At the conclusion of it we adjourned to the supper-room, which afforded us a better opportunity of observing the distinguished company. My husband was presently engaged in conversation with the Hon. Mrs. Norton, who was then very handsome. Her hair, which was decidedly black, was arranged in flat bandeaux, according to the fashion of the time. A diamond chain, formed of large links, encircled
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899, Chapter 8: first years in Boston (search)
ally desired to attain connoisseurship in art. He had not the many-sided power of appreciation which distinguished Parker, yet a reverence for the beautiful, rather moral than aesthetic, led him to study with interest the works of the great masters. In his later years, he never went abroad without bringing back pictures, engravings, or rare missals. He had little natural apprehension of music, but used to express his admiration of some favorite operas, among them Mozart's Don Giovanni and Rossini's Barbiere di Seviglia. In the Senate Committee on Foreign Affairs, of which he was chairman for many years, his acquaintance with foreign languages was much valued. I remember a line of Tasso which he sometimes quoted when beautiful hands were spoken of:— Dove ne nodo appar, ne vena eccede. On the other hand, I have heard him say that mathematics always remained a sealed book to him; and that his professor at Harvard once exclaimed, Sumner, I can't whittle a mathematical idea small
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899, Index (search)
, 141. Rogers, Prof. William B., vice-president of the Town and Country Club, 405; lectures to the club, 406. Rome, the Howes' arrival in, 121; stiffness of society in, 123, 127; Mrs. Howe's second visit to, 191; political condition of, 193-195; Mrs. Howe's stay in, on her way to Greece, 313; spends the winter of 1877-78 in, 423-427. Rosebery, Lord, a friend of Samuel Ward, 72; visited by, 73; at Devonshire House, 410. Rosebery, Lady, 73. Rossi, Count, at Mrs. Benzon's, 436. Rossini, works of performed in New York, 14; admired by Sumner, 376. Round Hill School, 5; its principal, 43; Mrs. Howe's brother Samuel at, 67. Routs, receptions so called, 93. Russell, Mrs., Sarah Shaw, a friend of Theodore Parker, 168. St. Angelo, Castle of, 130. St. Calixtus, catacombs of, 128. St. Luke, academy of, 154. St. Peter, church of, 121, 125, 126. Salisbury, the Howes at, 139-141. Samana Bay, the Howes' first visit to, 348; later stay at, 361-368; school at,
body knows; but perchance there are some to whom the description, as meagre as it is, will be interesting. At present there are but few troops close by the Junction, as most of them are scattered in order to get good camping grounds, places where good water can be found and good fields for drill and exercise. The Eighth Louisiana is close by the depot, and is now engaged in guarding the town and in doing general picket and police duty. This disagreeable task they bear patiently and without complaint; and, what is more, they do their duty well. Their excellent band plays night and morning, and we while away many a twilight hour in listening to the sweet songs of home or gems from Mozart and Rossini mingled with the soul-stirring music of Strauss. The storm of yesterday has passed away, and pleasant weather has come once more. The mud has entirely dried up and the roads are again passable, and I shall take the saddle to-morrow for a trip to the advanced lines. G. M.
ratus need so great a supply of electricity as that of Morse, and is much less affected by the condition of the atmosphere. The Empress has lately had her likeness telegraphed to some of her friends in the provinces, and last week Cassella telegraphed a painting of a full-blown rose from the observatory to the bureau of the telegraphic administration. The petals were of a beautiful pink color, and the leaves of an equally good green; in short, were exactly like the tints of the original. Rossini, also, not many days ago, telegraphed to Marseilles by this apparatus a melody which he improvised in honor of the inventor, and which has since gone the rounds of the Paris salons. The above statement seems incredible, but not more so than many things would have seemed a few years ago which we now know to be true. It will not do to discredit now-a-days all that seems wild and wonderful. A few years ago, if any man had predicted such an invention as the Morse telegraph, by which inst
Rossini's latest composition --Rossini's new mass was produced on March 14th, at the residence of the composer's friend, Count Wippern, near Paris, before about five hundred people. It is written for soprano, alto, tenor, and bass solo, with Rossini's new mass was produced on March 14th, at the residence of the composer's friend, Count Wippern, near Paris, before about five hundred people. It is written for soprano, alto, tenor, and bass solo, with chorus, and on this occasion was accompanied on two pianos and a harmonium. Rossini was present, and the Sisters Marchislof, with Gardoni and Agnesi, were the singers, the chorus numbering only twenty voices, while among the audience were MeyerbeerRossini was present, and the Sisters Marchislof, with Gardoni and Agnesi, were the singers, the chorus numbering only twenty voices, while among the audience were Meyerbeer, Auber; Carafa, Mario, Duprez, and other composers and artists. The composition, though often florid, is yet described as very grand and fully worthy of the great master. The most noticeable features of the mass are a Kyrie, a majestic Gloria, a y an unaccompanied chorus, and a fugue, Cum Sanctu Spritu. After the performance, the ladies present insisted on kissing Rossini. Meyerbeer called him "Jupiter," Auber, in burlesque patronage, said "he has talents worthy cultivation;" and Bagler, t
other men, distinguished in the world of literature, and art. "In the musical world there was also a good deal of excitement last week.--The veteran maestro Rossini, besides his usual receptions of Saturday, gives each year ten grand musical soirees. The first of these was given on Friday evening last, and will long be remembered by those who had the good fortune to be present. Rossini played two of his own compositions, and accompanied Alboni, who sang the air of la Donna del Lago. Patti — who is Rossini's great favorite and pet — carried off the honors of the evening. Madam Gardoni, Dellie Sedie, Agnesi and Scalese also participated in the 'solemnithose who had the good fortune to be present. Rossini played two of his own compositions, and accompanied Alboni, who sang the air of la Donna del Lago. Patti — who is Rossini's great favorite and pet — carried off the honors of the evening. Madam Gardoni, Dellie Sedie, Agnesi and Scalese also participated in the 'solemni