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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 95 15 Browse Search
John Beatty, The Citizen-Soldier; or, Memoirs of a Volunteer 68 18 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 58 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 56 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 47 41 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 32 0 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 26 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 22 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 19 7 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 11 9 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Rousseau or search for Rousseau in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 45: the cruise of the Sumter and the havoc she committed. (search)
The Governor, after an inspection of his artillery and a consultation with the military commandant, made up his mind that it would be best not to coerce any ship belonging to the Southern Confederacy, for fear that these modern representatives of Drake and Morgan might follow the example of their illustrious predecessors if interfered with, and left Semmes to do pretty much as he pleased. The Abby Bradford was sent in charge of a prize-crew to New Orleans, to report her arrival to Commodore Rousseau, delivering to him the prize-papers, seals unbroken, etc. The vessel reached Barrataria Bay, but was recaptured by the Powhatan, Lieutenant D. D. Porter, and restored to her owners. Semmes did not burn the Abby Bradford, because, as he says, I only resorted to that practice when it became evident there was nothing else to do. As soon as Lieutenant Porter ascertained from the crew of the Abby Bradford the whereabouts of the Sumter, he obtained the permission of Flag-officer McKean,