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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 93 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 27 1 Browse Search
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 3 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 2 2 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for John B. Rowan or search for John B. Rowan in all documents.

Your search returned 48 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
sses in Louisiana and Mississippi, so that Captain Rowan applied to the Secretary of War for sevente of the darkness. A sergeant was sent to Captain Rowan requesting him to send a mule team. Aboutn front, it was expected to command, while Captain Rowan was directed to construct his works at rigst as they took position beside their guns. Rowan's battery now became exposed to a raking fire orks. It was a great relief when he heard Captain Rowan give the order to cease firing. Sergeantil the order, cease firing, was given. Captain Rowan left Lieutenant Ritter in command, with or's column passed within three hundred yards of Rowan's battery, giving the latter the opportunity tbout 1 o'clock in the morning of the 30th, Captain Rowan ordered Lieutenant Ritter to go with the osunset General Loring came up, and ordered Captain Rowan to fire as rapidly as possible, so as to aof these guns, detailing men to work them from Rowan's and Corput's batteries. Several attempts ma[6 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Third battery of Maryland Artillery. (search)
zation. The number of men in the battery had been much reduced by its losses in Louisiana and Mississippi, so that Captain Rowan applied to the Secretary of War for seventy-five conscripts. While at Decatur the guns, horses and equipments of a fsed to pull, while the drivers could not well see which way to move, because of the darkness. A sergeant was sent to Captain Rowan requesting him to send a mule team. About day-light the mules came, the gun carriage was soon out of the mud, and ate horses, when hitched to it, would not budge a step. He was determined not to lose the forge, and rode on to inform Captain Rowan of the situation, and ask for four mules. The Captain referred him to General Pettus who had that morning lost somly part of December the men were engaged in building houses for themselves and stables for the horses. The officers, Captain Rowan, Lieutenants Ritter, Giles and Doucaster, and Surgeon Rogers built themselves a cabin twelve by sixteeen feet, with a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Third battery of Maryland Artillery. (search)
n front, it was expected to command, while Captain Rowan was directed to construct his works at rigst as they took position beside their guns. Rowan's battery now became exposed to a raking fire orks. It was a great relief when he heard Captain Rowan give the order to cease firing. Sergeant Frazier asked Lieutenant Ritter to go to Captain Rowan, and ask that he might be carried off the the others, and jumped into that one where Captain Rowan and Colonel Beckham were. The trip was fu's column passed within three hundred yards of Rowan's battery, giving the latter the opportunity t assured will result in a glorious victory. Rowan has an unfortunate position, in which I was resunset General Loring came up, and ordered Captain Rowan to fire as rapidly as possible, so as to aof these guns, detailing men to work them from Rowan's and Corput's batteries. Several attempts main Corput was about this time wounded, and Captain Rowan took command of the battalion, which left [2 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketches of the Third Maryland Artillery. (search)
I copy the following communications of Captain John B. Rowan: Headquarters Rowan's battery, nearRowan's battery, near Kingston, Ga., Jan'y 28, 1864. Major,—On my return from furlough I found the stock of my batteem supplied. Respectfully submitted, John B Rowan, Captain commanding Battery. To Major Joseph Pon, G. A. Haywood, A. C. C. head-quarter's Rowan's battery, near Dalton, Ga., April 10th, 1864.y supply our wants, I remain Yours &c., John B. Rowan, Captain commanding Battery. Major J. W. J importance of this, and none more so than Captain Rowan. It is impossible, however, that horses c Very respectfully your obedient servant, John B. Rowan, Captain Commanding. Endorsement. Headt was to blame for this state of affairs. Captain Rowan says that he saw with his own eyes thousan command was by the way of North Carolina. Captain Rowan learned that they, rather than return by terable force of cavalry was kept there. Captain Rowan obtained permission to send Lieutenant J. [1 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketches of the Third Maryland Artillery. (search)
batteries seemed to outnumber ours three to one. Their fire now became fearfully hot, and Captain Rowan, wishing to return it with the greatest vigor, called on the drivers to assist the fives andmoved, and those that remained were thus saved. Captain Rowans death. At half past 12, Captain Rowan was struck by a piece of shell, and instantly killed. The shell came in through the right fhorses that were left to the battery. It was here that Lieutenant Ritter first learned that Captain Rowan's body had been left on the field to fall into the hands of the enemy. The dead Commander. Captain John B. Rowan was a native of Maryland, and at the beginning of the war, resided at Elkton, Cecil county, where he devoted himself with success to the practice of the law. Though still y of Lieutenant Giles and Private Colter, captured two days before the battle. Killed: Captain John B. Rowan, Privates S. Aultman, E. R. Roach and A. Wills. Wounded: A. Dollar, D. Beasley, N. Be