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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 1: operations in Virginia.--battle of Chancellorsville.--siege of Suffolk. (search)
omplete drawings of all of Peck's works, and had determined to get in his rear and surprise him. The detachment was detained. Admiral Lee was asked, by telegraph, to send gun-boats up the Nansemond, and made a prompt and practical answer; and Longstreet quickly perceived that his attempt at a surprise was a failure. Then he determined to carry the works at Suffolk by assault. Longstreet's first care was to drive away the half-dozen armed tug and ferry boats (commanded by Captains Lee and Rowe) which lay in the way of his crossing the Nansemond, there narrow and sinuous. For this purpose batteries were erected under cover of darkness, and opened upon them in broad daylight, which seriously wounded the little warriors afloat, but did not drive them far from the scene of conflict. And right gallantly did that little detachment of the National navy perform its part, and most usefully assist the land troops in a siege which continued twenty-four days. Longstreet recalled Hill from No
s have a chance, and they will surely give a good account of themselves. They marched with the greatest alacrity, and shouted when the order was given. They all have the proper mettle. Norfolk, May 20, 9 P. M. All is quiet here to-night. Between 1,500 and 2,000 Confederate troops were concentrated at Sewell's Point last night, but the Yankee mercenaries did not return, as apprehended, and our men, who were actually eager for the fray, had nothing to do. The steamer West Point, Captain Rowe, belonging to the York River Railroad line, left the railroad wharf at Portsmouth, to-day, under a flag of truce, to visit the Federal fleet off Old Point Comfort, for the purpose of carrying to that destination all the women and children who desire to join their Northern friends. The steamer was accompanied by Capt. Thos. T. Hunter, commander of the Virginia Navy. The families of the following, among other persons, left in the steamer: James Hepenstall, L. T. Barnard, J. Lucas, Ge
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 19. the siege of Suffolk, Virginia. (search)
e guns was opened by them below Norfleet battery. Chopping parties were broken up by the Redan and Mansfield battery. They re-occupied the Hills Point battery in the night. The steamers Commerce and Swan, under the volunteer pilotage of Lieutenants Rowe and Norton, of the Ninety-ninth New York, ran down past the batteries in the night, but not without many shots. These officers are entitled to much credit for this service. Twenty-eighth.--Suffolk was visited by a heavy storm. A rebel wrris,United States Navy, sent by Admiral Lee, has been very effective, and I take great pleasure in acknowledging the gallant services of their officers and crews. The army gunboats, Smith Briggs. and West End, commanded by Captain Lee and Lieutenant Rowe, proved invaluable. The Smith Briggs was for many days the only boat above the West Branch, in consequence of the order of Admiral Lee. My personal staff have all earned a place in this record by their zeal, fidelity, and unremitting lab
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Fourth: orations and political speeches. (search)
their way thither from the Southern States and from South America. In support of this last statement numerous authorities might be adduced. It is stated that a member of Congress from Tennessee has recently declared, that, within his own knowledge, there would be taken to California, during the summer just passed, from ten to twelve thousand slaves. And another person states, from reliable evidence, that whole families are moving with their slaves from Tennessee, Arkansas, and Missouri. Mr. Rowe, under date of May 13, at Independence, Mo., on his way to the Pacific, writes to the paper, of which he was recently the editor, the Belfast Journal, Maine,—I have seen as many as a dozen teams going along with their families of slaves. And Mr. Boggs, once Governor of Missouri, now a resident of California, is quoted as writing to a friend at home as follows,—If your sons will bring out two or three negroes, who can cook and attend at a hotel, your brother will pay cash for them at a goo
their way thither from the Southern States and from South America. In support of this last statement numerous authorities might be adduced. It is stated that a member of Congress from Tennessee has recently declared, that, within his own knowledge, there would be taken to California, during the summer just passed, from ten to twelve thousand slaves. And another person states, from reliable evidence, that whole families are moving with their slaves from Tennessee, Arkansas, and Missouri. Mr. Rowe, under date of May 13, at Independence, Mo., on his way to the Pacific, writes to the paper, of which he was recently the editor, the Belfast Journal, Maine,—I have seen as many as a dozen teams going along with their families of slaves. And Mr. Boggs, once Governor of Missouri, now a resident of California, is quoted as writing to a friend at home as follows,—If your sons will bring out two or three negroes, who can cook and attend at a hotel, your brother will pay cash for them at a goo
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 7: colonial newspapers and magazines, 1704-1775 (search)
s, Franklin gradually developed a book shop in his printing office. There was nothing unusual in this fact, by itself. His rival, Andrew Bradford, and many other printers in the colonies had odd collections for sale. But while Bradford was advertising the Catechistical guide to sinners, or The plain man's path-way to Heaven, along with an occasional Spectator, Franklin's importations, listed in the Gazette for sale, included works of Bacon, Dryden, Locke, Milton, Otway, Pope, Prior, Swift, Rowe, Defoe, Addison, Steele, Arbuthnot, Congreve, Rabelais, Seneca, Ovid, and various novels, all before 1740. The first catalogue of his Library Company shows substantially the same list, with the addition of Don Quixote, and the works of Shaftesbury, of Gay, of Spenser, and of Voltaire. These latter were probably for sale in the printing office as well. Advertisements of merchandise in all the colonies throw a good deal of light on the customs of the time, and, incidentally, also on the po
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
, 182 Roach, Miss, Chevillette, 317 Rob of the bowl, 311 Robbins, Abigail, 192 Robert of Lincoln, 272 Robertson, William, 29, 91, 97 Robespierre, 91 Robin, Abb6, 212 Robinson, J., 227 Robinson Crusoe, 284, 302 Rogers, Major, Robert, 217 Rogers, Samuel, 243, 255, 265 Rolfe, John, 225 Rolliad, the, 171, 174 Romeo and Juliet, 265 Roscoe, William, 255 Rose, Aquila, 161 Rose of Aragon, 231 Rosemary, 263 Rousseau, 102, 119, 187, 188, 199, 208, 213, 331, 346 Rowe, 116 Rowlandson, Mrs., Mary, 6, 7 Rowson, Mrs., Susanna, 179, 226, 285, 286 Royal America magazine, the, 123 Rules by which a great Empire may be reduced to a small one, 98, 140 Ruling passion, the, 179 Rural poems, 163 Rural Wanderer, the, 234 Rush, Benjamin, 91 Ruth, 183, 197, 213 Ryan's Company, 218 S St. Asaph, Bishop of, 103 St. Augustine, 59 St. Francis, 104 Salmagundi, 233, 238-239, 240, 247, 311 Sands, 240 Sandys, Edward, 18 Saratoga
d, 1804, Beach street, 1708 Sentury Hill, 1708; Site of the State House, 1795, Beacon Hill, 1784 Somersett to Davis lane; extended west, 1733-1803-1831; Western avenue added, 1865, Beacon street, 1708 In part, Blind lane, 1708; Pond lane, Rowe's lane, 1803, Bedford street, 1820 In part, Purchase street, 1800; in part, Batterymarch at one time, Belcher's lane, 1708 School alley, 1732; Grammar alley, 1795; Prince street avenue, 1833, Bennet avenue, 1839 Extended to Front street, sell to Charles; May st., 1733, Revere street, 1855 Hanover to Back, to Fish, 1820; Wood lane; Proctor's lane; now Parmenter, (Richmond street,) 1800 Cambridge to Hill street, Ridgeway lane, 1788 Between Essex and Pond sts., built over, (Rowe's Pasture,) 1777 Prince to Charter; Green lane; Hanover to Charter, 1824; Back street, 1708, Salem street, 1708 Hanover to Ann; Salutation alley, 1708, Salutation street, 1825 Cornhill to Somerset; So. Latin school, 1759; Cornhill to Trem
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The civil history of the Confederate States (search)
from Yankeedom. Still I am not in favor of adopting a new policy, or having Congress dictate what shall be the disposition of our forces with regard to the enemy. Congress should not usurp the military power. The resolution was laid on the table. Four days later Congress came readily to unanimous agreement upon another proposition concerning the unaltered purpose of the Confederates to effect a political separation from the United States. The resolution to this effect was offered by Mr. Rowe in the House, February 24th, as follows: Whereas, the United States are waging a war against the Confederate States with the avowed purpose of compelling the latter to reunite with them under the same Constitution and government, and Whereas, the waging of war with such an object is in direct opposition to the sound Republican maxim that all government rests upon the consent of the governed, and can only tend to consolidation in the general government and the consequent destruction of the
men, and at South Mountain and Sharpsburg fought with conspicuous bravery in Garland's brigade. In describing the fighting on his part of the field near the center of the Confederate line at Sharpsburg, Gen. D. H. Hill reported the fact that the Twenty-third North Carolina was brought off by the gallant Lieutenant-Colonel Johnston and put in position in the sunken road, and he especially commended Johnston among the officers distinguished on that bloody field. At Chancellorsville, when Major Rowe, leading the Twelfth North Carolina, was killed, LieutenantCol-onel Johnston took command of that regiment. This regiment and the Twenty-third were both in Rodes' gallant division, which was in the front of Jackson's brilliant flank attack. In this battle the North Carolinians under Johnston captured a stand of the enemy's colors. After Gettysburg Johnston was promoted to the rank of brigadier-general, to date September 1, 1863, and assigned to the command of his brigade, formerly led b
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