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The Daily Dispatch: June 19, 1861., [Electronic resource], Inspector General's office, Headq'hs, Richmond, June 5th, 1861 (search)
Grand larceny. --Fontaine Rowe, the hero of a dozen disorderly proceedings, and an active participant in the riot at Solitude, ending in the breaking of John Curry's skull, was brought before the Mayor on yesterday, charged with exerting his talents in a new field — that of discovery. He had found and appropriated to his own use $32 in bank notes and $8 in coin, belonging to Antonio Silva.--The proof showed that the money was not lost. Rowe was committed to jail till the second Monday irting his talents in a new field — that of discovery. He had found and appropriated to his own use $32 in bank notes and $8 in coin, belonging to Antonio Silva.--The proof showed that the money was not lost. Rowe was committed to jail till the second Monday in July, when he will be brought before the Hustings Court for a further examination. It is quite likely that the present charge will land him in the White House--a kind of college where the students learn their lessons under compulsio
A Correction. --Under the head of "Grand Larceny" we mentioned, in yesterday's paper, the sending on, by the Mayor, for further examination, of Fontaine Rowe, for stealing a sum of money. The types or our inadvertance made us say, immediately afterwards, "the proof showed that the money was not lost." The word "not" had no business where it appeared.
The Daily Dispatch: February 11, 1862., [Electronic resource], What the North Thiske of the war thus far. (search)
er did not identify him as one of the men who attacked him, and he was let off on that charge. Information having been given to the Mayor that Clarke had assisted to relieve Louis Antone of $75, an offence in whose commission he was aided by Fontaine Rowe, the witness was introduced and positively identiliod Clarke as Rowe's companion. The latter has been in the State's prison for several months, having been sent up for three years for his participation in the offence. The new case against CRowe's companion. The latter has been in the State's prison for several months, having been sent up for three years for his participation in the offence. The new case against Clarke was continued, and he remanded to jail. John J. Allbone, arraigned for drawing a pistol on some unknown person in the street, proved that the arm was not loaded; that he was "sky-larking" and corned at the time. Discharged with an admonition. Jas. J. Macklin, arrested for threats to set fire to Franklin Hall, was discharged, proving to have been drunk at the time, and generally a trifling fellow. He pretended on the night of his arrest to have belonged to the New Market Club in
dy in the public streets agaist her consent. The assault in this instance was no doubt provoked by the exceeding loveliness of the subject operated on; but the Mayor intimated that the consent of both parties was essential to make such a transaction valid in the eyes of the law. A stolen kiss is valued at a good figure in the court of Hymen, but it is doubtful whether the Mayor would decide it to be grand larceny.--James Clarke was remanded for trial before the Hustings Court for aiding Fontaine Rowe to relieve Louis Antone of $75 on the 10th of last June.--Christopher Kissell was brought up, charged with stealing 16 car springs belonging to the C. S. Government, taken from the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, and in the possession of the Central Railroad. The evidence given in led to the impression that he was innocent of the charge. The case was continued for another hearing.--William Pittman, a free negro, was arraigned at the instance of John D. Lowry, charged with stealing a pair
mon law, amongst which he classed the emunle recently attempted by certain residents of the penitentiary, who desired to enlarge their sphere of usefulness. The Grand Jury being thus instructed, retired, and soon returned with a true bill for felony against Alexander Wright, other wise called Allen Smith, for escaping from the State's prison. A true bill for felony was also found against John McQuay, otherwise called Henry Russell; Joseph Laurence, John Powers Edward Barry, Wm. Harren, Fontaine Rowe, Silas Beazley, James P. Henry, Jesse Howell, Henry Horst, Henry Baldwin, and George Stephens, for conspiring together on the 21st of April to resist the lawful authority of an officer of the Penitentiary, for the purpose of escaping therefrom. Another true bill for felony was also found against the last named parties, for making, procuring, secreting, and having in their possession certain keys for a similar purpose. If the parties are convicted, as they no doubt will be.--a number of