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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for M. B. Rowe or search for M. B. Rowe in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.20 (search)
ld Memorial Commission, of Pennsylvania; Governor Edwin S. Stuart, of Pennsylvania and staff, and Admiral Winfield Scott Schley. The parade formed at the courthouse, under command of Major Clay W. Evans, of Pennsylvania, chief marshal, and Captain M. B. Rowe, of this city, assistant marshal, headed by Tansil's band of sixteen pieces, followed by Washington Guards, Captain T. M. Larkin; Maury Camp of Confederate Veterans, Major A. B. Bowering; R. S. Chew Camp, Sons of Confederate Veterans, W. H. by Brigadier-General Tyler, embracing the 134th Regiment, commanded by Colonel O'Brien; the 139th, commanded by Colonel Frick; the 126th, commanded by Colonel Elder, who fell early in the movement, leaving the command of the regiment to Lieutenant-Colonel Rowe, and the Ninety-first Regiment, commanded by Colonel Gregory. The Second Brigade was commanded by Colonel Allabach, leaving his regiment, the 131st, to be commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Shabt; the 133d, commanded by Colonel Speakman;
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.22 (search)
l of whom lost their lives either upon or within rifleshot of the place where they lie buried. Some of the wall, however, is still intact, the stone now green and gray with age, while the old Marye mansion, on the summit, is the residence of Captain Rowe. The columns of its spacious porch are still perforated with bullet-holes, its walls are chipped where shell and shrapnel struck, and the outbuildings are bored in numerous places with the small, round hole of the minie-ball. The slaughtern between them. The battle of Salem Church. Down the hill and out upon the road over which Sedgwick's Corps marched, the visitors passed, the horses' heads being turned toward Salem church. At some little distance from Fredericksburg, Captain Rowe pointed out a frame, two-story house. My father, he said, placed all his furniture in that house for safe-keeping, and there it remained until one day a shell came along, struck the house, and burst in the room in which the furniture was stor