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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 4 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 2, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for John H. Rowland or search for John H. Rowland in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
f the Fleet. Steam-frigate Wabash, Flag-ship. Commander, Thomas G. Corbin; Lieutenant-Commander, John Irwin; Lieutenant Alexander S. Mackenzie, Ordnance-Officer; Lieutenant Samuel W. Preston, Flag-Lieutenant; Lieutenants, Lloyd Phenix, John H. Rowland and James P. Robertson; Fleet Surgeon, George Clymer; Assistant Surgeons, Henry F. McSherry and Theoron Woolverton; Paymaster, John S. Cunningham; Chaplain, George W. Dorrance; Acting-Master, Townsend Stiles; Marine Officers: Captain, James e day an undisturbed intelligence and a quick and general observation, which proved very useful. His duties as signal-officer were performed without mistake. This gentleman and the young officers--Mr. R. H. Lamson, Mr. J. P. Robertson and Mr. J. H. Rowland, who were also under my eye, in immediate command of the pivot-guns and spar-deck divisions — sustained the reputation and exhibited the benefits of the Naval Academy, the training of which only could make such valuable officers of such you
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Letters relating to the battle of Port Royal and occupation of the Confederate forts. (search)
t, was devoted and intelligent in the performance of his duties; and the third-assistant engineer, Missieveer, who attended the bell, was prompt and always correct. Acting-Master S. W. Preston, acting as my flag-lieutenant, displayed throughout the day an undisturbed intelligence and a quick and general observation, which proved very useful. His duties as signal-officer were performed without mistake. This gentleman and the young officers--Mr. R. H. Lamson, Mr. J. P. Robertson and Mr. J. H. Rowland, who were also under my eye, in immediate command of the pivot-guns and spar-deck divisions — sustained the reputation and exhibited the benefits of the Naval Academy, the training of which only could make such valuable officers of such young men. Commander John Rodgers, a passenger in this ship, going to take command of the steamer Flag, volunteered to act upon my staff. It would be difficult for me to enumerate the duties he performed, they were so numerous and varied, and he bro