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ain with our hymns of praise. The night passed slowly, for my wounded hand and foot pained me exceedingly. With the return of daylight, conversation with Captain Crawford was resumed, and we learned that in his cell with him was a man named Rowley, who was from Florida. He, like ourselves, had attempted to pass the lines, but was recaptured in the act. Originally residing in Florida, taking no part in the war, and attending quietly to his own business, he had been suddenly arrested. nessed. At one period, he said that it was certain death for a man to refuse to volunteer. Our second day of imprisonment passed dully enough, and indeed it would have been much worse, but for the converse we held with Captain Crawford and Mr. Rowley, whose principal theme was the lightness of their rations. Their allowance of corn-bread, for instance, was a bit about one and a half inches square twice a day. My wounds were exceedingly painful, but I was obliged to suffer on without obtain
t U. S. Chasseurs, Col. John Cochrane, and 31st Pennsylvania, Col. Williams, held their ground until the advance of Gen. Sumner's corps, which had with great difficulty made its way across the swollen Chlikahominy, checked tile Rebel advance in that direction. Brig.-Gen. Peck, who held the left of Conch's position, had been divested of most of his regiments aforesaid, which were successively ordered up to the front by Couch or Keyes, until, at 4 1/2 P. M., he led the 102d Pennsylvania, Col. Rowley, and 93d, Col. McCarter, to the aid of our crumbling right, and was for half an hour sharply engaged with the triumphant enemy near Seven Pines, losing some ground, but encamping very near his field of conflict. Heintzelman was promptly summoned to the aid of Couch; but there was an unaccounted — for delay in the reception of the message, and some of his regiments did not rush to the front quite so impetuously as a good portion of Couch's, especially the 55th New York (De Trobriand's F
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, chapter 15 (search)
s at Chattanooga. As night closed in, I ordered General Jeff. C. Davis to keep one of his brigades at the bridge, one close up to my position, and one intermediate. Thus we passed the night, heavy details being kept busy at work on the intrenchments on the hill. During the night the sky cleared away bright, a cold frost filled the air, and our camp-fires revealed to the enemy and to our friends in Chattanooga our position on Missionary Ridge. About midnight I received, at the hands of Major Rowley (of General Grant's staff), orders to attack the enemy at dawn of day, with notice that General Thomas would attack in force early in the day. Accordingly, before day I was in the saddle, attended by all my staff; rode to the extreme left of our position near Chickamauga Creek; thence up the hill, held by General Lightburn; and round to the extreme right of General Ewing. Catching as accurate an idea of the ground as possible by the dim light of morning, I saw that our line of attack was
nnonading, distinctly audible, quickened the steps of the men. Snake Creek, difficult of passage at all times, on account of its steep banks and swampy bottom, ran between me and the point of junction. A short distance from it Capts. Rawlins and Rowley, attached to Gen. Grant's staff, overtook me. From them I learned that our lines had been beaten back; that the right, to which I was proceeding, was then fighting close to the river, and that the road pursued would take me in the enemy's rear, w obtained a few crackers for my men. About nine A. M., I was ordered by Gen. Grant to move up to the support of Gen. McClernand, then engaged near his own camp with the First brigade and Mann's battery. I moved forward under the direction of Captain Rowley, Aid-de-Camp, and formed line on the left of Gen. McClernand, with whom that brigade and battery remained during the entire day, taking their full share of the varied fortunes of that division in the gallant charges and the desperate resistan
ps at Chattanooga. As night closed, I ordered General Jeff. C. Davis to keep one of his brigades at the bridge, one close up to my position, and one intermediate. Thus we passed the night, heavy details being kept at work on the intrenchments on the hill. During the night the sky cleared away bright, and a cold frost filled the air, and our camp-fires revealed to the enemy and to our friends in Chattanooga our position on Missionary Ridge. About midnight I received at the hands of Major Rowley, of General Grant's staff, orders to attack the enemy at dawn of day, and notice that General Thomas would attack in force early in the day. Accordingly, before day I was in the saddle, attended by all my staff, rode to the extreme left of our position, near Chickamauga, thence up the hill held by General Lightburn, and round to the extreme right of General Ewing. Catching as accurate an idea of the ground as possible by the dim light of morning, I saw that our line of attack was in
sted chiefly of infantry mounted on the horses of the country collected during the campaign. The cooperation of the fleet under Rear Admiral Farragut, on the waters west of the Mississippi, as well as at Port Hudson, was harmonious and effective, and contributed greatly to the success of our arms, A battery of heavy guns was established in the rear of the works, by one of the officers of the navy, the fire of which was most constant and effective. The signal corps, under command of Captain Rowley, and subsequently under Captain Roe, and the telegraphic corps, under Captain Bulkley, rendered every assistance possible to these branches of the service. By means of signals and telegraphs, a perfect communication was maintained at all times, night and day, between the fleet and the army, and with the different portions of the army. The rebels admitted, after the close of the siege, that they had lost in killed and wounded, during the siege, six hundred and ten men; but they underr
eveal to us the everyday calculations, and many of the social habits, of our Medford ancestors; and, in the absence of town-records, serve as authentic data from which we can write the history of their cares and labors, their sacrifices and prosperity. They found it difficult to pay the wages of their workmen and servants. Even such men as Governor Winthrop were hard pressed in this way. He illustrates the severities of the common lot in these words:-- I may report a passage between one Rowley and his servant. The master, being forced to sell a pair of his oxen to pay his servant his wages, told his servant he could keep him no longer, not knowing how to pay him next year. The servant answered him, he could serve him for more of his cattle. But what shall I do (saith the master) when all my cattle are gone? The servant replied, You shall then serve me; and so you may have your cattle again. It was natural enough that such extremities as these should awaken the public mind
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 14: fall of 1862 (search)
rneyRobinson, Ward, Berry StonemanSickles WhippleCarr, Hall, Revere Piatt, Carroll9 Batteries Hooker5th CorpsGriffinBarnes, Sweitzer, Stockton ButterfieldSykesBuchanan, Andrew, Warren8 Batteries HumphreysTyler, Allabach Left Grand Division1st CorpsDoubledayPhelps, Rogers, Gavin, Meredith ReynoldsGibbon MeadeRoot, Lyle, Taylor Sinclair, Magilton, Jackson11 Batteries Franklin6th CorpsBrooksTorbert, Cake, Russell W. F. SmithHowePratt, Whiting, Vinton11 Batteries NewtonCochrane, Devens, Rowley 6 Corps18 Divisions51 Brigades53 Batteries Burnside began his campaign with a blunder. He adopted Richmond as his objective, instead of Lee's army. The latter was within a day's march of him, and its wings were separated by two days march. Here was an opportunity for a skilful commander, but Burnside decided to make Fredericksburg a base, and to move thence upon Richmond. On Nov. 15, he turned his back upon Lee and marched for Fredericksburg. Meanwhile, he had made some important c
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 15: Chancellorsville (search)
rnished. The spirit of the men revived with the consciousness of their immense superiority in numbers and equipment, and it was with good show of reason that Hooker spoke of his army when it took the field, as the finest army on the planet. His organization was as follows, with the strength of each corps present for duty equipped on April 30. corpsDIVISIONSBRIGADESARTILLERY Batts.Guns 1stWadsworthPhelps, Cutler, Paul, Meredith1052 ReynoldsRobinsonRoot, Baxter, Leonard 16,908DoubledayRowley, Stone 2dHancockCaldwell, Meagher, Zook, Brook848 CouchGibbonSully, Owen, Hall 16,893FrenchCarroll, Hays, MacGregor 3dBirneyGraham, Ward, Hayman954 SicklesBerryCarr, Revere, Mott 18,721WhippleFranklin, Bowman, Berdan 5thGriffinBarnes, McQuade, Stockton842 MeadeSykesAyres, Burbank, O'Rorke 15,724HumphreysTyler, Allabach 6thBrooksBrown, Bartlett, Russell954 SedgwickHoweGrant, Neill NewtonShaler, Brown, Wheaton 23,667BurnhamBurnham corpsDIVISIONSBRIGADESARTILLERY Batts.Guns 1
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 16: Gettysburg: the first day (search)
cent for Infantry and Artillery and 15 per cent for Cavalry. Army of the Potomac. Present for duty, June 30, 1863 corps STRENGTHDIVISIONSBRIGADESARTILLERY Batts.Guns 1st CorpsWadsworth Meredith, Cutler ReynoldsRobinsonPaul, Baxter 10,355RowleyBiddle, Stone, Stannard523 2d CorpsCaldwellCross, Kelley, Zook, Brook HancockGibbonHarrow, Webb, Hall 13,056HaysCarroll, Smyth, Willard524 3d CorpsBirneyGraham, Ward, De Trobriand Sickles 12,630HumphreysCarr, Brewster, Burling530 5th CorpsBorth of the Chambersburg Pike. Almost at the moment of his victory, however, Reynolds was killed. He was an excellent soldier and was well known to have been the choice of the army to replace Hooker. Meanwhile, Cutler was now reenforced by Rowley's division of the same corps, which extended its line farther to the right. Robinson's division also approached and was held in reserve near by. Later, as the engagement grew more severe, it was also put into the battle. Meanwhile, Hill had f
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