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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 21, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Ruggle or search for Ruggle in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.54 (search)
k. General Bragg also, as he tells us, was there in person and assumed command. Giving, he says, a common head and a common purpose to the whole, he launched them with a resistless weight at the enemy, who now gave way, and on all sides were forced from the line of Wallace's and Hurlbut's encampments, leaving behind more of their artillery and 3,000 prisoners, chiefly of Prentiss' Division, in the hands of their assailants. At the same time, on the center and left, Polk's Divisions, with Ruggle's Divisions of Bragg, and some of Hardee's also, made no less strenuous efforts to close the battle. Those of the routed Federals who were not killed or captured dropped back in great confusion toward the landing. Some were rallied upon the ridge immediately overhanging the landing, but large masses were added to the already dense mob of fugitives huddled below the bank. But, meanwhile, Colonel Webster, chief of the Federal staff, an officer of the regulars, who knew his profession, obs