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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.42 (search)
l. Robert F. Taylor; 49th N. Y., Col. Daniel D. Bidwell; 77th N. Y., Col. James B. McKean. Brigade loss: k, 12; w, 23; mn, 87 == 122. Artillery, Capt. Romeyn B. Ayres: E, 1st N. Y., Capt. Charles C. Wheeler; 1st N. Y., Capt. Andrew Cowan ; 3d N. Y., Capt. Thaddeus P. Mott; F, 5th U. S., Capt. Romeyn B. Ayres. Artillery loss: I, 3; w, 4; m, 15==22. Cavalry: I and K, 5th Pa., Capt. John O'Farrell. Loss: k, 1. cavalry reserve, Brig.-Gen. P. St. George Cooke. First Brigade: 6th Pa., Col. Richard H. Rush; 5th U. S. (5 co's), Capt. Charles J. Whiting (c), Capt. Joseph H. McArthur. Second Brigade, Col. George A. 11. Blake: 1st U. S. (4 co's), Lieut.-Col. William N. Grier; 6th U. S. (with Stoneman's command), Capt. August V. Kautz. Cavalry Reserve loss: k, 14; xw, 55; in, 85 == 154. [Brig.-Gen's George Stoneman and William H. Emory operated on the right flank of the army with a mixed command of infantry, cavalry, and artillery.] Total loss of the Army of the Potomac: 1734 killed,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Hanover Court House and Gaines's Mill. (search)
the weakest point of our line, owing to the closer proximity of the woods held by the enemy. Under his cover they could form, and with less exposure in time and ground than elsewhere, and launch their battalions in quick succession upon our men. I believed I had guarded against the danger by strongly and often reenforcing the troops holding this part of the line. Here the greater part of McCall's and Slocum's forces were used. Just preceding this break, to my great surprise, I saw cavalry, Rush's Lancers, which I recognized as ours, rushing in numbers through our lines on the left, and carrying off with sudden fright the limbers of our artillery, then prepared to pour their irresistible fire into a pursuing foe. With no infantry to support, and with apparent disaster before them, such of the re mainder of these guns as could be moved were carried from the field; some deliberately, others in haste, but not in confusion. In no other place was our line penetrated or shaken. The rig
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The charge of Cooke's cavalry at Gaines's Mill. (search)
erefore, an excellent opportunity of seeing what was going on. Colonel G. A. H. Blake, United States Army, wrote me, June 16th, 1879: About sundown you advanced the brigade under a warm fire and I deployed the 5th and 1st Cavalry in two lines, and a little to the rear of (the interval of) reserve batteries of artillery, which had opened a rapid fire. The infantry of the left wing had then disappeared from the top of the hill. You then rode off to a battery further to the left, where Rush's Lancers had been ordered. The 5th Cavalry soon charged, and I saw no more of them. You had ordered me to support them; there was a warm fire, and the smoke and dust made everything obscure. I saw none of the 5th, after it was broken, pass through the battery, which was very near. It was soon forced to retire, and was followed by the 1st in its rear. Finally, General William N. Grier, United States Army, wrote me, July 19th, 1879: The reserve was stationed on the hill, . . . in f
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., With the cavalry on the Peninsula. (search)
was set ajar, the Virginia Central and the Richmond and Fredericksburg railroads were destroyed. In the resultant melee about Hanover Court House, the cavalry, under Emory, Royall, Lawrence Williams, Chambliss, Whiting, Harrison, and Arnold, and Rush's 6th Pennsylvania, aggressively attacked infantry, captured whole companies with arms, swept right, left, and rear, and generally filled the ideal of cavalry activities in such a battle. General Lee assumed command June 1st. On the 13th he anld ten days, and was finally taken to Richmond, where he was rescued from death by the kind care of Generals Hood and Field. In this battle there were two and a half squadrons of the 5th and two squadrons of the 1st U. S. Cavalry, three squadrons Rush's Lancers (6th Pennsylvania Cavalry), and-one squadron 4th Pennsylvania (Col. Childs). Two or three weeks before this several officers of the 3d Pennsylvania Cavalry, Newhall, Treichel, W. E. Miller, and others, penetrated the region between t
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., In the ranks to the Antietam. (search)
testifying in every way the general joy. September 13th in Frederick City was a bright one in memory for many a month after — a pleasant topic to discuss over many a camp-fire. The next day our regiment went on a reconnoissance to a speck of a village, rather overweighted by its name,--Jefferson,--about eight miles from Frederick and on our left. Far up the mountainside ahead of us we could see, in the fields confronting the edge of the woods that crowned the ridge, the scattered line of Rush's Lancers, their bright red pennons fluttering gayly from their spear heads. We reached camp again about 10 o'clock at night, and found awaiting us marching orders for 2 o'clock the following morning. Late as it was, one of my tent-mates — an enterprising young fellow — started out on a foraging expedition, in pursuance of a vow made several days before to find something with which to vary his monotonous regimen of hard-tack and salt horse. He ran the guard--an easy thing to do in the d<
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces in the Maryland campaign. (search)
. E. D. Muhlenberg. Artillery loss: Antietam, k, 1; w, 15; m, 1 == 17. cavalry division, Brig.-Gen. Alfred Pleasonton. First Brigade, Maj. Charles J. Whiting: 5th U. S., Capt. Joseph H. McArthur; 6th U. S., Capt. William P. Sanders. Brigade loss: Antietam, w, 1. Second Brigade, Col. John F. Farnsworth: 8th Ill., Maj. William H. Medill; 3d Ind., Maj. George H. Chapman; 1st Mass., Capt. Casper Crowninshield; 8th Pa., Capt. Peter Keenan. Brigade loss: Antietam, w, 6. Third Brigade, Col. Richard H. Rush: 4th Pa., Col. James H. Childs (k), Lieut.-Col. James K. Kerr; 6th Pa., Lieut.-Col. C. Ross Smith. Brigade loss: Antietam, k, 3; w, 10 == 13. Fourth Brigade, Col. Andrew T. McReynolds: 1st N. Y., Maj. Alonzo W. Adams; 12th Pa., Maj. James A. Congdon. Fifth Brigade, Col. Benjamin F. Davis: 8th N. Y., Col. Benjamin F. Davis; 3d Pa., Lieut.-Col. Samuel W. Owen. Unattached, 15th Pa. (detachment), Col. William J. Palmer. Loss: Antietam, k, 1. The total loss of the Union Army in the th