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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 23 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 16 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 8 0 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 4 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Oldport days, with ten heliotype illustrations from views taken in Newport, R. I., expressly for this work. 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Irene E. Jerome., In a fair country 2 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 2 0 Browse Search
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ned in anatomy, and perfect in the theory of surgery; he may be able to thoroughly describe the manner in which the most difficult operation should be performed, but may never have possessed sufficient nerve to undertake even one operation in which serious risk was involved, and thus give life to his theories by practical work. Who would employ a surgeon who had never used the knife? Furthermore, who could, under the circumstances, declare him with reason an eminent man in his profession? Ruskin can, probably, better describe a painting than any artist of ancient or modern times. His gorgeous descriptions attracted the attention of the world to the wonderful genius of Turner; but who would venture to assert that he himself was a great painter, when he has perhaps never used the brush? Thus it is as it should be: no man is justly entitled to be considered a great General, unless he has won his spurs. Had General Johnston possessed the requisite spirit and boldness to seize the var
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.25 (search)
the generous temper, humour, moods, and his fond weaknesses. We should know more about his inward thoughts, his best views of men, and matters political, literary, social, etc., etc., to get a complete knowledge of him. These letters only refer to Lowell and his immediate acquaintances, and there are very few things in them that a reader would care to hear twice. I could scarcely point to a dozen sentences, all told, that compel a pause. How different this is from what one could show in Ruskin, the prose poet of England, or in Carlyle; or in Boswell's Johnson, or in De Quincey, even! Yet, I admit, it is unfair to judge Lowell by his Letters only, and that we should examine his prose and poetry before deciding. Twice, only, was I thrilled, just a little, and then from sympathy with the bereaved husband and father. Had Lowell kept a journal like Sir Walter Scott, I feel the world would have had something worth reading. Sometimes I appear to look, as through a window, into the
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches, Longfellow (search)
ifax, --a popular book in its time, but not read very much since. He calls Charles Reade a clever and amusing writer. We find nothing concerning Disraeli, Trollope, or Wilkie Collins. Neither do we hear of critical and historical writers like Ruskin, Matthew Arnold, Carlyle, and Froude. He went, however, to call on Carlyle in England, and was greatly impressed by his conversation. The scope of Longfellow's reading does not compare with that of Emerson or Marian Evans; but the doctors say t in their own dialect, greatly to their surprise and satisfaction. From a number of incidents in this journey, related by Rev. Samuel Longfellow, the following has a permanent interest: When the party came to Verona in May, 1869, they found Ruskin elevated on a ladder, from which he was examining the sculpture on a monument. As soon as he heard that the Longfellow party was below, he came down and greeted them very cordially. He was glad that they had stopped at Verona, which was so int
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2, The lost arts (1838). (search)
iolet, and prove to you that beyond their limit there are rays still more delicate, and to you invisible, but which he, by chemical paper, will make visible; and he will tell you that probably, though you see three or four inches more than three hundred years ago your predecessors did, yet three hundred years later our successors will surpass our limit. The French have a theory that there is a certain delicate shade of blue that Europeans cannot see. In one of his lectures to his students, Ruskin opened his Catholic mass-book, and said, Gentlemen, we are the best chemists in the world. No Englishman ever could doubt that. But we cannot make such a scarlet as that; and even if we could, it would not last for twenty years. Yet this is five hundred years old! The Frenchman says, I am the best dyer in Europe; nobody can equal me, and nobody can surpass Lyons. Yet in Cashmere, where the girls make shawls worth thirty thousand dollars, they will show him three hundred distinct colors w
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, XVI: the crowning years (search)
Jan. 5, 1903. The lecture was considered a great success. All standing room occupied and almost everybody stayed through. I found reading to be far easier than speaking without notes (as I have done so long) and almost as effective; it seemed like beginning a new career and my voice served me well. Of the third course, in 1905, he wrote:— Feb. 28. First Lowell lecture (Wordsworth-shire). A great success—an unexpectedly fine voice. March 7. Second Lowell lecture. Carlyle, Ruskin, Froude, Hunt. March 28. Fifth Lowell lecture. Dickens, Thackeray and reading Tennyson's poems. April 4. Last Lowell lecture. Considered very successful and was pronounced by John Lowell the best he ever heard in that hall. In May, 1903, he spoke at the Concord Emerson celebration:— Meeting good and my address successful. After it, Senator Hoar turned to me and said, grasping my hand, What I have to say is pewter and tinsel compared to that. His position as chairma<
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, Bibliography (search)
. Country Homes of Famous Americans.) Introduction. (In Sinclair. The Aftermath of Slavery.) American Audiences. (In Atlantic Monthly, Jan.) The Close of the Victorian Epoch. (In Atlantic Monthly, March.) English Literature in the Last Half of the Nineteenth Century: lectures delivered at the Lowell Institute, Boston, 1905. Not published, but reported in part in the Boston Evening Transcript under the following titles and dates: A Few English Poets, March I; Carlyle, Froude, Ruskin, March 8; Darwin's Domesticity, March 15; Landor and his Class, March 22; Recent English Letters, March 29; Browning and Tennyson, April 5. Letters of Mark. (In Atlantic Monthly, April.) Wordsworthshire. (In Atlantic Monthly, July.) William James Rolfe. (In Outlook, July 22.) Literature as a Pursuit; An Address before the Harvard Ethical Society, Cambridge, Mass. (In Critic, Aug.) History in Easy Lessons. (In Atlantic Monthly, Sept.) The Cowardice of Culture. (In Atlant<
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 8: the Southern influence---Whitman (search)
st innovating poets to revert to the ranks of order before they die. Whitman abstained, through all his later publications, from those proclamations of utter nudity to which Emerson objected, and omitted some of the most objectionable instances of it from later editions; and was also far more compressed and less simply enumerative than when he began. True poetry is not merely the putting of thoughts into words, but the putting of the best thoughts into the best words; it secures for us what Ruskin calls the perfection and precision of the instantaneous line. It fires a rifle-bullet instead of a shower of bird-shot; it culls the very best phrase out of language, instead of throwing a dozen epithets to see if one may chance to stick. For example, Emerson centres his Problem in a cowled church-man; ; Browning singles out an individual Bishop Blougram or Rabbi Ben Ezra, as the case may be; but Whitman enumerates priests on the earth, oracles, sacrificers, brahmins, sabians, lamas, monks
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 10: forecast (search)
go hopelessly wrong in one's judgment of individuals, books or writers. For instance, Addison still stands, traditionally, at the head of English prose writers, in respect to style; but from his account of the greatest English poets he omits the names of Shakespeare, Beaumont, Fletcher, Massinger, Webster and Marlowe; a tolerably correct list of the leading dramatic poets in the English tongue. One might almost say that he wrote his list through time's telescope reversed. In the same way Ruskin rules out from his list of English poets Shelley and Coleridge. One might hope that the good taste or vanity of the great poets themselves would restore the balance of their own fame, at least, but Tennyson wrote in his later years, I feel as if my life had been a useless life; and Longfellow said, a few years before his death, to a young author who shrank from seeing his name in print, that he himself had never got over that feeling. Would it please you very much, asks Thackeray's Warri
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, chapter 13 (search)
tor Resartus. 1836. Dickens's Pickwick papers. 1837-1900. Victoria. 1841. Robert Peel Prime Minister. 1841. Punch established. 1842. Darwin's Coral Reefs. 1843. Wordsworth Poet-Laureate. 1843. Macaulay's Essays. 1843-1860. Ruskin's Modern Painters. 1846. Repeal of Corn Laws. 1847. Miss Bronte's Jane Eyre. 1847. Thackeray's Vanity Fair. 1848-1876. Macaulay's History of England. 1850. Wordsworth died. 1850. Tennyson Poet-Laureate. 1850. Tennyson's In Mes Henry Esmond. 1853. Kingsley's Hypatia. 1854-1856. Crimean War. 1856. Matthew Arnold's Poems. 1857. Indian Mutiny. 1859. Darwin's Origin of species. 1859. George Eliot's Adam Bede. 1862. Spencer's First principles. 1864. Ruskin's Sesame and Lilies. 1864. Newman's Apologia. 1865. Matthew Arnold's Essays in criticism. 1866. Swinburne's Poems and ballads. 1867. Disraeli Prime Minister. 1867. Parliamentary Reform Bill. 1868. Browning's The Ring and the boo
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 22: divines and moralists, 1783-1860 (search)
ortance in the history of American thought has perhaps not been generally recognized. In many ways he suggests William James. Moreover, he has a style, nervous, clean, and racy. Kept fresh by its antiseptic virtue, his Literary Varieties—the volumes of essays entitled Work and play (1864), and Moral uses of dark things (1868) and Building Eras in religion (1881)—will still richly reward a reader. Indeed, all of Bushnell's prose, though manifestly influenced by Emerson, by Carlyle, and by Ruskin, yet possesses its own peculiar vitality, a pulsation that at its best may be likened, to use a metaphor of his own, to the beat of wings. Henry Ward Beecher, too, was born in the orthodox uplands of Litchfield, and of a strictly Calvinistic sire. Lyman Beecher (1775-1863) had studied theology under Timothy Dwight at Yale; had occupied, after 1798, first the Presbyterian pulpit at Easthampton, Long Island, next the Congregational pulpit at Litchfield, and lastly that of the Park Street <
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