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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 23 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 16 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 8 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 4 0 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 4 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 21, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. 2 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in James Russell Lowell, Among my books. You can also browse the collection for Ruskin or search for Ruskin in all documents.

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James Russell Lowell, Among my books, Dante. (search)
en published, beside separate volumes of comment and illustration. We have thus sketched the steady growth of Dante's fame and influence to a universality unparalleled except in the case of Shakespeare, perhaps more remarkable if we consider the abstruse and mystical nature of his poetry. It is to be noted as characteristic that the veneration of Dantophilists for their master is that of disciples for their saint. Perhaps no other man could have called forth such an expression as that of Ruskin, that the central man of all the world, as representing in perfect balance the imaginative, moral, and intellectual faculties, all at their highest, is Dante. The first remark to be made upon the writings of Dante is that they are all (with the possible exception of the treatise De Vulgari Eloquio) autobiographic, and that all of them, including that, are parts of a mutually related system, of which the central point is the individuality and experience of the poet. In the Vita Nuova he r