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drew in detachments, some of which came again into action near my headquarters. Almost immediately after ordering the Twenty-third and Sixty-first to support the right, and as soon as they could be reached, I sent the Seventh Massachusetts, Col. Russell, and the Sixty-second New-York, Col. Riker, to reenforce them. The overpowering advance of the enemy obliged these regiments to preceed to Fair Oaks, where they fought under the immediate orders of Generals Couch and Abercrombie. There they ment captured. For further particulars of the conduct of the Sixty-second New-York and the First United States Chasseurs, as well as for the account of those two excellent regiments, the Seventh Massachusetts and Thirty-first Pennsylvania, Cols. Russell and Williams, I refer to the reports of Gens. Couch and Abercrombie. Those regiments, as well as Brady's battery, First Pennsylvania artillery, (which is highly praised,) were hid from my personal observation during most of the action. They
e Deven's) brigade, of Couch's division, was ordered up to support Sickles. The vigilant and ever ready commander of the Fourth corps had put Couch's division under arms when the firing first became warm on the left, and they had awaited their chance till now. They went up the road handsomely, the Massachusetts Tenth, commanded by Lieut.-Colonel Decker, in advance, followed by the Rhode Island Second, Col. Frank Wheaton; the New-York Thirty-six, Col. Innis, and the Massachusetts Seventh, Col. Russell. At the same time, battery D, First New-York artillery, (four rifled pieces,) Capt. T. W. Osborn, was ordered up the Williamsburgh road, to shell the woods beyond our advance. It was expected that they would throw shell directly over our advancing line into the enemy's line and into his camp beyond. Several of Capt. Osborn's shells fell false, and exploded in the rear and even right in the ranks of our men. By this means, the Massachusetts Seventh, which was deployed in the woods as
Savage, wounded twice and a prisoner; Captains Quincy and Russell, prisoners; Surgeon Leland, wounded slightly while attendi Maryland Heights, Col. Miles directed Captain (now Major) Russell, of the Maryland cavalry, to take with him a few men and ereinforced, and to urge the sending of reinforcements. Capt. Russell reached General McClellan's headquarters at Frederick aon his arrival Gen. McClellan sent off a messenger, as Captain Russell understood, to General Franklin. At ten A. M. Capt.Capt. Russell left for Gen. Franklin's command, with a communication to General Franklin from Gen. McClellan. He reached Gen. Fra New-York cavalry, Col. Davis; First Maryland cavalry, Colonel Russell; a detachment of First Maryland cavalry, (home brigadestance to companies I and H of the First Maryland cavalry. Russell's Roughs advanced on foot with revolver and carbines in hased, left his couch repeatedly to go upon the field. Capt. Russell, of the Maryland home brigade, who exchanged the pastor
ourage. Saddening as is the loss of these brave, gallant officers, all of whom were men of education, ability, and high social position, who had devoted themselves to the service of their country in her hour of need, and proved themselves able and faithful in the discharge of duty, there remains the consolation that they died gloriously in the defence of as righteous a cause as a man could fight for. I have also to report Major Savage, wounded twice and a prisoner; Captains Quincy and Russell, prisoners; Surgeon Leland, wounded slightly while attending wounded men on the field; First Lieutenant Robeson and Second Lieutenants Grafton, Oakey and Browning, wounded — the latter severely, and Second Lieutenant Miller, missing. Second Lieutenant Heirvack, of the Zouaves d'afrique, is also missing. The loss of the regiment so far as at present known amounts to five commissioned officers killed, six wounded, and three missing, out of twenty-two in action; twenty-five non-commissioned
ation of Maryland Heights, Col. Miles directed Captain (now Major) Russell, of the Maryland cavalry, to take with him a few men and endeavor unless reinforced, and to urge the sending of reinforcements. Capt. Russell reached General McClellan's headquarters at Frederick at nine Aately upon his arrival Gen. McClellan sent off a messenger, as Captain Russell understood, to General Franklin. At ten A. M. Capt. RussellCapt. Russell left for Gen. Franklin's command, with a communication to General Franklin from Gen. McClellan. He reached Gen. Franklin about three o'cloc; Eighth New-York cavalry, Col. Davis; First Maryland cavalry, Colonel Russell; a detachment of First Maryland cavalry, (home brigade;) two cany assistance to companies I and H of the First Maryland cavalry. Russell's Roughs advanced on foot with revolver and carbines in hand, in f indisposed, left his couch repeatedly to go upon the field. Capt. Russell, of the Maryland home brigade, who exchanged the pastorate of t
short time before with two hundred secesh soldiers. Scouting parties were immediately despatched in different directions to find the enemy. Major James M. Deems was sent with three companies eight miles towards Sperryville, as far as Devil's Run, but no enemy in force was found. A few bushwhackers were seen, and three of them taken prisoners. The Major returned to town at sundown, when he was again ordered, and with six companies, namely, company L, Capt. Thistleton; company I, Captain Charles Russell; company H, Captain Grafflin; company B, Capt. John Hancock; company D, Lieut. Marsdorf, and company E, Lieut. Joseph Cook. The order was to proceed at once to Rapidan station, and burn the large railroad bridge over the Rapidan River. Six miles from Fairfax the command was fired upon by the enemy, when a brisk skirmish for ten miles in succession took place, the enemy being driven rapidly before us. On the arrival at the railroad bridge, where the enemy's guards were stationed, a