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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 38 2 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 15 5 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 7 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 5 1 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 4 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for John H. Russell or search for John H. Russell in all documents.

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James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The organization of the Federal Navy (search)
gate of the old navy The Colorado was one of six 40-gun screw frigates, the pride and strength of the Federal navy in 1861. Like most of her sister-ships of the old navy, the Colorado (built for sea fighting) was prevented by her size from getting up the narrow channels, and her gallant commander, Theodorus Bailey, had to lead the fleet at New Orleans past the forts in another vessel. On September 14, 1861, at Pensacola, volunteers from the Colorado's crew in four boats, led by Lieutenant J. H. Russell, carried off a cutting out expedition. They drove the stubbornly resisting crew from the Confederate privateer Judah and destroyed the vessel. him with the details of department work. Under Welles, as assistant secretary, was appointed Gustavus V. Fox, a brilliant naval officer, whose eighteen years in the service had well fitted him for the work he was to take up, and whose talents and foresight later provided valuable aid to the secretary. At the head of the bureau of yards a
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The most daring feat — passing the forts at New Orleans (search)
T. Craven; Richmond, twenty-two guns, Commander James Alden. Side-wheel steamer: Mississippi, seven guns, Commander Melancton Smith. Screw corvettes: Oneida, nine guns, Commander Samuel Phillips Lee; Varuna, ten guns, Commander Charles S. Boggs; Iroquois, seven guns, Commander John De Camp. Screw gunboats: Cayuga, two guns, Lieutenant Napoleon B. Harrison; Itasca, four guns, Lieutenant C. H. B. Caldwell; Katahdin, two guns, Lieutenant George H. Preble; Kennebec, two guns, Lieutenant John H. Russell; Kineo, two guns, Lieutenant George M. Ransom; Pinola, three guns, Lieutenant Pierce Crosby; Sciota, two guns, Lieutenant Edward Donaldson; Winona, two guns, Lieutenant Edward T. Nichols; Wissahickon, two guns, Lieutenant Albert N. Smith. In the final plan of action the fleet was divided into three divisions. The first was to be led by Captain Theodorus Bailey, who had transferred his flag from the old Colorado to the little gunboat Cayuga, and was to be made up of the Pensacol
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval actions along the shore (search)
been some skirmishing. The squadron under Captain John Pope that had been sent, after the escape of the Sumter to sea, to the mouth of the Mississippi, had a chance to bring on an action, in October, 1861, with several of the Confederate naval vessels. But Pope's ships got aground in the passes of the delta, and he and his captains exercising undue caution, refused offer of battle and made out into the Gulf. There were two brilliant bits of boat-work at Pensacola and Galveston. Lieutenant John H. Russell cut out and destroyed the unfinished Confederate privateer Judah, at the Pensacola Navy-Yard, on September 13, 1861, and Lieutenant James E. Jouett, of the frigate Santee, took and destroyed the privateer Royal Yacht in Galveston Harbor, in November. Many were the gallant acts of the enlisted men and petty officers in the fighting along the shore. In the expedition under Flag-Officer Goldsborough against Roanoke Island, in February, 1862, there were two brave little fights betw
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval chronology 1861-1865: important naval engagements of the Civil war March, 1861-June, 1865 (search)
, 30 pieces of cannon, 1000 stand of arms, 3 vessels with valuable cargoes, and 750 prisoners were taken. August 30, 1861. Capt. Foote ordered to the command of U. S. naval forces on the Western waters. September, 1861. September 4, 1861. Engagement on the Mississippi River near Hickman, Ky., between U. S. gunboats Tyler and Lexington and the Confed. gunboat Yankee and shore batteries. September 14, 1861. An expedition from the U. S. frigate Colorado, under Lieut. J. H. Russell, destroyed the privateer Judah, under the Confed. guns at Pensacola. September 16, 1861. A naval expedition from Hatteras Inlet, under command of Lieut. J. Y. Maxwell, destroyed Fort Ocracoke, on Beacon Island, N. C. September 17, 1861. Ship Island, near the mouth of the Mississippi River, occupied by Federal forces from the steamer Massachusetts. October, 1861. October 1, 1861. U. S. steamer Fanny, with 35 men of the 9th N. Y. Volunteers, captured by the C