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aff, one thousand six hundred and eighty-seven. To which were attached Batterries H and M, Fourth United States artillery, commanded by Lieutenants Cushing and Russell (ten pieces). In conjunction with the division, we marched thence to Shell Mound, to Squirrel Town Creek, and thence to Lookout Valley; and on the morning of the en given me, yet I lost one man killed and one wounded from the enemy's artillery. From thence we withdrew to our present position without further harm. Lieutenant Russell, in command of M Company, Fourth United States artillery, on Saturday, the nineteenth, was placed in position in the centre of my front line, and did effectl Waters Eighty-fourth Illinois Vol. Infantry 1 12 2 81   9 3 102 105 Lieutenant-Colonel Foy Twenty-third Kentucky Vol. Infantry 1 10 3 49   6 4 65 69 Lieutenant Russell Battery M, Fourth U. S. A.   2   6       8 8 Lieutenant Cushing Battery H, Fourth U. S. A.   4 1 16   1 1 21 22     5 57 24 395 1 65 30 517 547
d the road to the James river over White Oak Swamp at all hazards, was received and carried out to the letter. During the evening, Captain Fitch's battery, Colonel Russell's Seventh Massachusetts volunteers and General Woodbury's engineer force, joined for duty at my headquarters. Parties, under discreet officers, were sent downs so as to cover most effectually the passage for other troops. So soon as the bridge was passable I moved General Palmer, (who had joined me with his brigade,) Russell's regiment leading a squadron of cavalry, and Regan's and Fitch's batteries of artillery, forward, to a position of much strategic importance, some four miles in ment seemed most reliable.. General Palmer led the advance from the White Oak Swamp, and made excellent dispositions, of which I am happy to make mention. Colonel Russell, Seventh Massachusetts, was in advance of the advance as usual, and exhibited his anxiety to meet the foe with his fine regiment. Colonels Farniman, Ninety
through; encamped one mile from river ; again we have to get from the Yankees; I wish this raid was through with. August 7.--Daylight; shoes drawn; 5 A. M., marched in rear; awful hot; through Martinsburg to Darksville; encamped; much tired; Russell sick; bought tobacco; rations too scanty for the severe duty we are doing. August 8.--Clear; Tennessee officers drew a pair of pants apiece; Colonel McRanny back from hospital; received a letter from N. A. W., highly pleased, it being the first received from her; she has not forgotten her rebel friend; must take an early opportunity of replying to it. August 9.--Clear; took Russell to hospital yesterday; 9 A. M., marched about five miles on Winchester Road; very hot; stewed apples for supper; encroached on to-morrow's rations; I act as water-bearer for Mess. No. Nasty, and find it a hard pill; officers drawing their pay; would much rather draw a clean shirt and slip. August 10.--Clear; start daylight; now resting five miles
division, besides killing and wounding a number. The same day the Fourteenth United States colored troops, Colonel Morgan commanding, carried one of the enemy's batteries up the river, after driving off the supports; the guns were spiked and the command returned to Decatur. Our loss was three officers killed and several officers and men wounded. General Granger estimated the force opposing him at one corps, and his scouts informed him there was also a corps at Warrenton, Alabama, with Russell's brigade of cavalry at Guntersville, on the river; Roddy's division of cavalry was picketing the south side of the Tennesse from Decatur to Tuscumbia, and Forrest, with the main cavalry force, was reported at Corinth, Mississippi, with outposts at Eastport and along the west bank of the Tennessee. On the twenty-ninth General Granger reported the enemy in his front to be withdrawing from Decatur toward Courtland. The same day General Croxton, commanding a brigade of cavalry picketing the
lows: On the right of General Sedgwick's line, nearest the river, were three regiments of General Shaler's brigade — the Sixty-fifth New York Chasseurs, One Hundred and Twenty-second New York, and Sixty-seventh Pennsylvania; General Seymour's brigade, of Ricketts' division, connected on the left. Next came General Neill's brigade, composed of the Forty-third, Forty-ninth, and Seventy-seventh New York, the Seventh Maine, and the Sixty-first Pennsylvania volunteers. Next came Upton's and Russell's brigades of the First divison; and last the Second brigade, of the Third division, commanded by Colonel Smith. A second and third line of battle, supporting the centre, was formed of the New Jersey brigade and the Fourth New York heavy artillery. The other brigades, of Ricketts' and Getty's division, were still detached, and acting with the Fifth and Second corps. General Warren's command was still reduced to the two divisions of Crawford and Griffin and a brigade of Robinson's, Gene
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 59. battles of Spottsylvania, Va: battle of Sunday, May 8, 1864. (search)
he Sixth, meanwhile, did a brilliant thing. About three hundred yards in front, the enemy occupied a work very strongly constructed, as high as a man's head, and loop-holed at the top. The party organized to attack this work was disposed by General Russell and led by Colonel Upton. It consisted of a portion of the First division, the Vermont brigade of the Second division, and some picked troops of General Neill's command, who were massed, on the eve of the attack, to the left and front of th. Our losses in this battle were perhaps more severe than those of any previous day. The Sixth corps alone, in the battles up to that night, had lost over five thousand killed arid wounded. General Wright s old division, now commanded by General Russell, had lost nearly one thousand four hundred; the losses in General Neill's, now Colonel Bidwell's, brigade, were between eight hundred and nine hundred, and the Vermont brigade alone had suffered the loss of one thousand five hundred of its n
till then, will the war-power of this government be exhausted. Mr. Goode, of Virginia, said he was opposed to the employment of negroes as soldiers under any circumstances. He was opposed to it because it was a confession of weakness to the enemy. He was opposed to it, because he thought it would end in abolition. He was opposed to it, because it was degrading to our men. He believed that the right place for Cuffee was in the corn-field. At quarter past two o'clock, on motion of Mr. Russell, of Virginia, the House went into secret session, to consider a bill reported from the Judiciary Committee. Opinions of the press and people. Richmond, November 4, 1854. gentlemen: Allow me a brief space to bring again to public notice the subject of negro conscription, and the probable action of the next Congress on this subject. That the owners of fifteen negroes, and upward, would prefer that Congress should conscript ten or even a greater per centum of their negroes for
ether with the First division of the Sixth corps, commanded by General Russell, were selected. The latter was quickly withdrawn from its posour cavalry could come up with it. We captured a few prisoners. Russell's division was across by nine A. M., and intrenched itself on the lry crossed the river at six in the morning. Three hours afterward Russell's division of the Sixth corps, after a beautiful march of twenty-tthe Third division (Ricketts), the centre, and the First division (Russell), the left. Five batteries, under charge of the Chief of Artillerefly along the front of Gibbon's division of the Second corps, and Russell's division of the Sixth. Of the former division the Second brigad a detachment of the Fifth Massachusetts colored cavalry under Colonel Russell, with Captain Choule's colored battery attached; General Kautzood soldiers. By command of W. F. Smith, Major-General. William Russell, Jr., Assistant Adjutant-General. Solon A. Carter, Captain and
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), General Grant's headquarters, near Hanovertown, south bank of the Pamunkey May 29, (search)
s securing us the means of another direct advance on Richmond. For this important duty the First and Second divisions of cavalry, under command of General Sheridan himself, together with the First division of the Sixth corps, commanded by General Russell, were selected. The latter was quickly withdrawn from its position on the right of our line, south of the North Anna, and recrossed the river at Jericho ford in the afternoon of the twenty-seventh. It took up the line of march, immediatelyce dashed across, chasing them over the bottom, and up the hills bordering it. A whole mounted brigade of the enemy was encamped on the latter, and fell back precipitately before our cavalry could come up with it. We captured a few prisoners. Russell's division was across by nine A. M., and intrenched itself on the hills. Meantime the main body of the army had also recrossed the North Anna, and was marching over the road toward the Pamunkey. All the corps had orders to recross after nigh
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), headquarters Army of the Potomac, in the field, near Hanovertown, Va. Tuesday, May 31. (search)
ital, a new line of defence. Certainly, if the Richmond journalists find any satisfaction in the monstrous circuit the army has made, the point at which it has aimed, this army is in condition to share the sentiment. Recrossing the North Anna on Thursday night and Friday morning, the corps were directed on parallel roads down the course of the Pamunkey to the town of Hanover, in the vicinity of which two divisions of cavalry crossed the river at six in the morning. Three hours afterward Russell's division of the Sixth corps, after a beautiful march of twenty-two miles, made the passage. The enemy, apparently not expecting the crossing to be made so far down the river, had only a cavalry force in observation at this point. The party was easily driven off, sixty being captured. The fords were uncovered for the passage of the army, which was effected during the day. It is certain that it was not till this movement was fairly under way, that Lee commenced the manoeuvring necessary
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