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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 52 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 20 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 14 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 12 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 10 0 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 8 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 6 0 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 6 0 Browse Search
G. S. Hillard, Life and Campaigns of George B. McClellan, Major-General , U. S. Army 6 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.). You can also browse the collection for Russian or search for Russian in all documents.

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Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 2: military policy, or the philosophy of war. (search)
e. If irregular troops are nothing when they compose the whole army, and if they do not know how to gain battles, it must be owned that, supported by good troops they are an auxiliary of the highest importance; when they are numerous, they reduce the enemy to despair, by destroying his convoys, intercepting all his communications, and holding him as it were invested in his camps; they render above all retreats disastrous, as the French experienced in 1812. (See article 45.) The same Russian general, with the same troops, will not be able to dare every thing against European armies, having the same instruction, and nearly the same discipline as his own. Finally, one can venture before a Mack what he would not venture before a Napoleon. The action of the cabinet upon the armies has an influence also upon the audacity of their enterprises. A general whose genius and arm are chained by an aulic council at four hundred leagues from the theatre of war, will struggle with disadva
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 3: strategy. (search)
Charles, had had upon the affairs of the Allies at the end of 1799, and which we have pointed out in Article 19, are yet present to the memory of every body. In 1805, Napoleon occupied Naples and Hanover; the Allies thought to send the Anglo-Russian corps to drive him out of Italy, and the Anglo-Russian aud Sweedish corps to repel him from Hanover; nearly sixty thousand men are destined for these two centrifugal expeditions. But whilst their troops were assembling at the two extremities ofRussian aud Sweedish corps to repel him from Hanover; nearly sixty thousand men are destined for these two centrifugal expeditions. But whilst their troops were assembling at the two extremities of Europe, Napoleon has ordered the evacuation of Naples and Hanover; St. Cyr comes to join Massena in the Frioul, and Bernadotte, quitting Hanover, comes to take an active part in the events of Ulm and Austerlitz: after those astonishing successes, Naples and Hanover were easily retaken. These are proofs against diversions: let us cite an example of the circumstances where they would be suitable. In the civil wars of 1793, if the Allies had detached from their armies twenty thousand veteran
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), chapter 7 (search)
there is necessary a mode which should unite mobility, solidity, and impulsion, whilst for the defensive there is wanted solidity united to the greatest possible fire. This truth admitted, it will remain to decide whether the bravest offensive troops, formed in columns and deprived of fire, will hold out long against deployed troops having twenty thousand musket shots to send it, and able to deliver it two or three hundred thousand in five minutes. In the late wars, we have often seen Russian, French and Prussian columns, carry positions at the support arms, without firing a shot; it is the triumph of impulsion and of the moral effect which it produces, but against the murderous fire and the sang froid of the English infantry, columns have not had the same success at Talavera, at Busaco, at Fuente di Onor, at Albuera, and still less at Waterloo. Meanwhile, it would be imprudent to conclude from thence that this result should cause the balance to incline decidedly in favor of
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Sketch of the principal maritime expeditions. (search)
e of Hindostan, were successive. Possessors of Calcutta, and afterwards of Bengal, they were reinforced there by degrees by partial detachments, and by the Sepoys whom they disciplined to the number of a hundred and fifty thousand. The Anglo-Russian expedition against Holland, in 1799, was executed by forty thousand men, but by several successive debarkations; it is, nevertheless, interesting from its details. In 1801, Abercrombie, after having disquieted Ferrol and Cadiz, made a descentousand of which were land troops, and thirty thousand sailors; it failed to attain its end because of the little genius of him who commanded it. A descent of altogether a similar nature to that of the King of Sweden, Charles X, was one of thirty Russian battalions crossing, in five columns, the Gulf of Bothnia upon the ice, with their artillery, in order to go to the conquest of the islands of Aland, and to spread terror even to the gates of Stockholm, whilst another division passed the gulf at