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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 11 5 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 1 1 Browse Search
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Legion Battalion.InfantryLt. Col. Jas. A. McKameyJan. 3, 1864.  14thNorth CarolinaBattalionCavalryLt. Col. Jas. L. HenryDec. 25, 1863.  15thNorth CarolinaBattalionCavalryLt. Col. Jas. M. WynnJuly 22, 1863.  1stSouth CarolinaRegimentCavalryCol. John L. BlackJune 25, 1862.  2dSouth CarolinaRegimentCavalryCol. M. C. ButlerAug. 22, 1862.Promoted Major-General. Col. Thos. J. Lipscomb   3dSouth CarolinaRegimentCavalryCol. C. I. ColcockAug. 19, 1862.  4thSouth CarolinaRegimentCavalryCol. B. Huger RutledgeDec. 16, 1862.  5thSouth CarolinaRegimentCavalryCol. S. W. Ferguson Promoted Brigadier-General. Col. John Dunnovant Promoted Brig adier-General. 6thSouth CarolinaRegimentCavalryCol. H. K. AikenNov. 1, 1862.  7thSouth CarolinaRegimentCavalryCol. A. C. Haskell   1stSouth CarolinaRegimentArtilleryCol. Alfred RhettSept. 5, 1862.  Col. Ransom D. Calhoun   2dSouth CarolinaRegimentArtilleryCol. A. D. FrederickOct. 17, 1862.  3dSouth CarolinaRegimentArtilleryCol. Wm. ButlerN
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: (search)
: Marion Artillery, Capt. J. G. King; Washington Artillery, Capt. George H. Walter; Lafayette Artillery, Capt. J. J. Pope; German Artillery (A), Capt. C. Nohrden; German Artillery (B), Capt. H. Harms. Cavalry: Charleston Light Dragoons, Capt. B. H. Rutledge; German Hussars, Capt. Theodore Cordes; Rutledge Mounted Riflemen, Capt. C. K. Huger. Volunteer corps in the fire department: Vigilant Rifles, Capt. S. V. Tupper; Phoenix Rifles, Capt. Peter C. Gaillard; Aetna Rifles, Capt. E. F. Sweegaders, 8-inch columbiads and one 9-inch Dahlgren. The supports to the batteries were the First regiment of rifles, Colonel Pettigrew; the regiment of infantry, South Carolina regulars, Col. Richard Anderson; the Charleston Light Dragoons, Capt. B. H. Rutledge, and the German Flying Artillery, the latter attached to Col. Pettigrew's command, stationed at the east end of the island. These commands, with Ripley's battalion of South Carolina regular artillery and Capt. Robert Martin's mortar batte
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 5: (search)
ions of infantry, two companies of cavalry, the Stono scouts, and two batteries (the Washington and Morrison artillery)—twenty-nine companies of all arms, all South Carolinians. Col. W. S. Walker, commanding the Third military district, with headquarters at McPhersonville, had under his orders an aggregate of forty companies of all arms, as follows: Eleventh volunteers, First and Second battalions of sharpshooters, Third regiment of cavalry, First, Second and Sixth battalions of cavalry, Rutledge mounted riflemen, Charleston dragoons, Kirk's partisan rangers, Elliott's Beaufort artillery, Kavanaugh's Lafayette battery, all South Carolina commands, and Nelson's Virginia battery. The whole Confederate force in South Carolina upon General Beauregard's assuming command, September 24, 1862, amounted to 202 companies of all arms, and aggregated 12,544 officers and soldiers present for duty. On October 22d, the battle of Old Pocotaligo was fought by Col. W. S. Walker, with a small for
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 10: (search)
P. N. Bonneau, Morris island; Ward's, Capt. J. Ward, Georgetown; Parker's, Capt. E. L. Parker, Second district; Washington, Capt. G. H. Walter, Second district; Horse artillery, Capt. W. L. Trenholm, Third district; Beaufort, Capt. S. Elliott, Third district; Lafayette, Capt. J. T. Kanapaux, Third district; Palmetto, Capt. W. E. Earle, Third district. Cavalry: Ferguson's regiment, Colonel Ferguson; Third regiment, Col. C. J. Colcock; Sixth regiment, Colonel Aiken; Rutledge cavalry, Col. B. H. Rutledge; Company, Capt. J. H. Tucker; Stono scouts, Capt. J. B. L. Walpole; rangers, Capt. M. J. Kirk. In aggregate the South Carolina commands were nine regiments and three battalions of infantry; two regiments and three battalions of heavy artillery; thirteen light batteries; four regiments and three independent companies of cavalry. Besides the South Carolina commands, General Beauregard had under his command in the State the North Carolina brigades of Generals Clingman and Cooke, an
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 17: (search)
together, under a rapid fire. The flagstaff was again struck on the 25th, and twice shot away on the 26th, the last time being replaced by Privates Walter Steele and D. E. Badger. In return, a skillful gunner at Fort Johnson brought down the Federal flag at Battery Gregg. With the approach of the May campaigns in Virginia and Georgia, heavy drafts were made upon General Beauregard's forces. On March 17th, the First and Second cavalry were ordered to South Carolina, and the Fourth, Colonel Rutledge; Fifth, Colonel Dunovant; Sixth, Colonel Aiken; Seventh Georgia, and Millen's battalion, and the cavalry companies of Captains Tucker, Wallace, Boykin, Trenholm and Magee were ordered from General Beauregard's department to Virginia. On April 14th, General Evans' brigade, under Gen. W. S. Walker, was ordered to Wilmington, N. C. The Eleventh and Eighteenth South Carolina, Colquitt's brigade, and Company A, siege train, were ordered back from Florida. General Beauregard, on the 20th, wa
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 18: (search)
ins was in command of his brigade, in the division now led by Maj.-Gen. C. W. Field, and the First regiment was commanded by Col. James R. Hagood, the Second (rifles) by Col. Robert E. Bowen, the Fifth by Col. A. Coward, the Sixth by Col. John Bratton, the Palmetto Sharpshooters by Col. Joseph Walker. General McGowan was again in command of his brigade, of Wilcox's division, on the Rapidan. The South Carolina cavalry brigade, under Gen. M. C. Butler, composed of the Fourth regiment, Col. B. Huger Rutledge; Fifth, Col. John Dunovant, and Sixth, Col. Hugh K. Aiken, was assigned to General Hampton's division. Garden's battery, the Palmetto artillery under Captain Fickling, the Pee Dee under Zimmerman, and Hart's battery continued in their former assignments. On the night of May 5, 1864, General Lee telegraphed to President Davis: The enemy crossed the Rapidan yesterday at Ely's and Germanna fords. Two corps of this army moved to oppose Him—Ewell's by the old turnpike, and Hill's
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 20: (search)
s brigade (Brig.-Gen. Samuel McGowan commanding) of Wilcox's division, Third army corps: First regiment, Lieut.-Col. Andrew P. Butler; Twelfth, Capt. Robert M. Kerr; Thirteenth, Capt. David R. Duncan; Fourteenth, Lieut.-Col Edward Croft; Orr's rifles, Maj. James T. Robertson. Cavalry brigade of Brig.-Gen. John Dunovant, of Maj.-Gen. M. C. Butler's division, cavalry corps, army of Northern Virginia, Maj.-Gen. Wade Hampton commanding: Third regiment, Col. Charles J. Colcock; Fourth, Col. B. Huger Rutledge; Fifth, Lieut.-Col. Robert J. Jeffords; Sixth, Col. Hugh K. Aiken. Capt. ugh R. Garden's battery was with Maj. J. C. Haskell's battalion; Capt. W. W. Fickling's with Maj. Frank Huger's battalion of the First corps; the Pee Dee artillery, Capt. E. B. Brunson, with Pegram's battalion, Third corps; Capt. J. F. Hart's battery with Hampton's corps. The Holcombe legion, Capt. A. B. Woodruff, brigade of Gen. H. A. Wise, was under General Beauregard's immediate command, department of
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
mustered into the Confederate service February 22, 1862, Mr. Walker retaining his rank of first lieutenant. In that year he took part in both the affairs at Pocotaligo, and in the first commanded the advance guard and was slightly wounded. He was highly commended in the report of Col. W. S. Walker, who said that Lieut. L. J. Walker performed the responsible duty assigned him with skill and courage. In June, 1863, the command was divided into two companies, A and B, Trenholm's squadron, Rutledge mounted riflemen and horse artillery. In April, 1864, he accompanied the riflemen to Virginia, reaching Richmond May 27th, and being assigned to the Seventh South Carolina cavalry, Gary's brigade, he was identified with that command until the close of the war. He took part in the opening fight at Cold Harbor, and was twice wounded, in the leg and shoulder, and continued on duty north of the James river, before Richmond, taking part in numerous skirmishes and battles, including the fights a